Summer Program Academics

2018 Summer Program

NYU Shanghai is offering all levels of intensive Chinese and many other content courses in Shanghai for summer 2018. All summer courses are open to NYU Shanghai students and are open by application to study away students from NYU New York, NYU Abu Dhabi and students from other accredited four-year universities.

The intensive Chinese language courses give students the opportunity to improve their Chinese language skills and experience the excitement and wonder of Shanghai, one of the most dynamic cities in Asia. Additionally, students have the opportunity to visit historical sites in Beijing in Summer Session I and Nanjing in Summer Session II. Students benefit from NYU Shanghai’s facilities, professors, and full-time academic and student life staff. Site visits to historic sites and neighborhoods arranged by NYU enable students to explore this city beyond the campus. Before you apply, we encourage you to learn more about NYU Shanghai.

 

Summer Session I: Tuesday, May 22 - Friday, June 29, 2018

Summer Session II: Monday, July 2 - Friday, August 10, 2018

 

 

Academics

All students can take courses during one of the two available 6-week summer terms. Students are required to take one four-credit course, and they cannot take more than three courses (totaling no more than 10 credits) during each summer session. It is suggested that students register for one 4-credit intensive language course along with one content course. Chinese language courses are required to be taken for a letter grade.  Students have the opportunity to sign up for a cultural visit to Beijing during Summer session I and a visit to Nanjing during Summer Session II. The following courses will be offered in Shanghai for Summer 2018. Click on the title of the course for its description.

 

Chinese Language Course Offerings (Both Session I and Session II)

Elementary Chinese I, CHIN-SHU 101

Offered Summer Session I and Summer Session II

This course is the first part of a one-year elementary-level Chinese course designed for students who have no or almost no knowledge of Mandarin Chinese. It is designed to develop language skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing as it relates to everyday life situations. The objectives of the course are: (1) to master the Chinese phonetic system (pinyin and tones) with satisfactory pronunciation; (2) to understand the construction of commonly used Chinese Characters (both simplified and traditional) and learn to write them correctly; (3) to understand and use correct basic Chinese grammar and sentence structures; (4) to build up essential vocabulary; (5) to read and write level-appropriate passages (100-150 characters long); and (6) to become acquainted with aspects of Chinese culture and society related to the course materials.

Elementary Chinese II, CHIN-SHU 102

Offered Summer Session I and Summer Session II

This course is the second part of a one-year elementary-level Chinese course designed for students who have completed NYU-SH’s Elementary Chinese I or equivalent. It is designed to reinforce and further develop language skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing as it relates to everyday life situations. The objectives of the course are: (1) to continue mastering the Chinese phonetic system (pinyin and tones); (2) to become further familiarized with the construction of commonly used Chinese Characters (both simplified and traditional); (3) to understand and use correctly basic Chinese grammar and sentence structures; (4) to continue building up essential vocabulary; (5) to read and write level appropriate passages (150-200 characters long); and (6) to become acquainted with aspects of Chinese culture and society related to the course materials.

Intermediate Chinese I, CHIN-SHU 201

Offered Summer Session I and Summer Session II

This course is the first part of a one-year intermediate-level Chinese course designed for students who have completed NYU-SH’s Elementary Chinese II or equivalent. It is designed to consolidate and develop overall aural-oral proficiency. Objectives are: (1) to be able to obtain information from more extended conversation; (2) to express and expound on, in relative length, feelings and opinions on common topics; (3) to develop vocabulary needed to discuss common topics and begin learning to decipher meaning of compound words; (4) to develop reading comprehension of more extended narrative and expository passages; (5) to write, in relative length (200-250 characters long), personal narratives, informational narratives, comparison and discussion of viewpoints with level-appropriate vocabulary and grammatical accuracy, as well as basic syntactical cohesion; (6) to continue being acquainted with aspects of Chinese culture and society related to the course materials.

Intermediate Chinese II, CHIN-SHU 202

Offered Summer Session I and Summer Session II

This course is the second part of a one-year intermediate-level Chinese course designed for students who have completed NYU-SH’s Intermediate Chinese I or equivalent. It is designed to continue consolidating and developing overall aural-oral proficiency, gradually focusing more on semi-formal or formal linguistic expressions. Objectives are: (1) to further develop competence in obtaining information from more extended conversation; (2) to express and expound on, in more extended length, feelings and opinions on socio-cultural topics; (3) to develop more specialized vocabulary needed to discuss sociocultural topics; (4) to improve students’ ability to decipher meaning of compound words; (5) to further develop reading comprehension of extended narrative, expository and simple argumentative passages; (6) to learn to solve simple syntactical problems independently; (7) to write, in relative length (250-300) characters long) informational narratives, expository and simple argumentative passages with level-appropriate vocabulary and grammatical accuracy, as well as basic syntactical cohesion; and (7) to continue being acquainted with aspects of Chinese culture and society related to the course materials.

Advanced Chinese I, CHIN-SHU 301

Offered Summer Session I and Summer Session II

This course is the first part of a one-year Advanced Chinese course designed for students who have successfully completed Intermediate Chinese II at NYU-SH, or who have at least the equivalent knowledge of Chinese upon registration. It is designed to reinforce and further improve students’ overall communicative competence by incorporating semi-formal or formal usages. The objectives of the course are: (1) to learn to apply formal linguistic expressions in speaking and writing; (2) to acquire specialized vocabulary and patterns necessary for conducting formal discussions of socio-cultural topics; (3) to develop reading comprehension of texts with more advanced syntax; (4) to learn to make context-based guesses about the meaning of a new word and further enhance students’ ability to analyze as well as produce sentences with more complex syntactical features; (5) to learn to write expository and argumentative passages in more extended length; and (6) to learn to employ basic rhetoric devices in writing.

Advanced Chinese II, CHIN-SHU 302

Offered Summer Session I and Summer Session II

This course is the second part of a one-year Advanced Chinese course designed for students who have successfully completed Advanced Chinese I at NYU-SH, or who have the equivalent knowledge of Chinese upon registration. It is designed to reinforce and further improve students’ overall communicative competence by incorporating semi-formal or formal usages. The objectives of the course are: (1) to enhance further students’ oral and written communicative competence using formal linguistic expressions; (2) to expand further specialized vocabulary and patterns necessary for conducting formal discussions of socio-cultural topics relevant to today’s China; (3) to improve further students’ reading comprehension of texts with more advanced syntax; (4) to develop further their competence in making context-based guess about the meaning of a new word, and further enhance ability to analyze as well as produce sentences with more complex syntactical features; (5) to improve further their ability to write expository and argumentative passages in more extended length; (6) to improve their ability to effectively employ basic rhetoric devices in writing.

Elementary Chinese I For Advanced Beginners, CHIN-SHU 111

Offered Summer Session I and Summer Session II

This course is the first part of a one-year elementary-level Chinese course designed for students who can understand and speak conversational Chinese related to daily-life situations, but have not learned to read/write Chinese characters. This includes students who were raised in a non-Chinese speaking country but in a home where the Mandarin Chinese dialect was spoken, and/or students who have acquired a certain level of Mandarin Chinese language proficiency (primarily speaking and listening) by living or working in a Chinese speaking country/region for an extended time. Though speaking and listening will be an integral part of the course, the major focus will be on developing students’ competence in reading and writing. The objectives of the course are: 1) to master the Chinese phonetic system (pinyin and tones) with satisfactory pronunciation; 2) to understand the construction of commonly used Chinese Characters (both simplified and traditional) and write them correctly; 3) to build up essential vocabulary needed to read and write about topics covered in the textbook; 4) to understand and use correctly basic Chinese grammar and sentence structures; 5) to comprehend level appropriate passages and to be able to perform simple sentence analysis; 6) to write level appropriate essays (250-300 characters long) with grammatical, accuracy as well as cohesion and coherence; 7) to become acquainted with and be able to discuss in speech and writing aspects of Chinese culture and society related to the course materials. Prerequisite: None.

Intermediate Chinese I For Advanced Beginners, CHIN-SHU 211

Offered Summer Session I and Summer Session II

This course is designed for students who have at least one year of Chinese language learning at NYU and who, before registering for this course, already command above-elementary aural-oral proficiency in Mandarin Chinese. The objectives are: to be able to obtain information from extended written passages; to both express and expound on, in relative length, feelings and opinions on common social and cultural topics; to expand vocabulary and learn to decipher the meaning of compound words; to develop reading comprehension of extended expository and simple argumentative passages; to solve non-complex textual problems with the aid of dictionaries; to write in relative length personal narratives, informational narratives, comparison and discussion of viewpoints with level appropriate vocabulary and grammatical accuracy, as well as syntactical cohesion; to continue to become acquainted with aspects of Chinese culture and society related to the course materials. Prerequisite CHIN-111.

 

Content Course Offerings (Session I)

Management & Organizations, MGMT-SHU 301 (4 credits)

Offered Summer Session I. Instructor: Raymond Ro

This course addresses contemporary management challenges stemming from changing organizational structures, complex environmental conditions, new technological developments, and increasingly diverse workforces. It highlights critical management issues involved in planning, organizing, controlling, and leading an organization. Ultimately, it aims to strengthen students’ managerial potential by providing general frameworks for analyzing, diagnosing, and responding to both fundamental and complex organizational situations. It also provides opportunities for students to enhance their communication and interpersonal skills, which are essential to effective management. The structure of the course encourages learning at multiple levels: through in-class lectures, exercises, and discussions; in small teams carrying out projects; and in individual reading, study, and analysis.

Foundations of Finance, BUSF-SHU 202 (4 credits)

Offered Summer Session I. Instructor: Offer Shapir

This course is a rigorous, quantitative introduction to financial market structures and financial asset valuation. The main topics of the course are financial markets, arbitrage, portfolio selection, equilibrium asset pricing, fixed income securities and option pricing. You are expected to understand valuation formulas and be able to apply them to new problems. The appropriate tools necessary for solving these problems will be developed at each stage and practiced in the homework assignments. The models we will cover have immediate applications and implications for real-world financial decisions. To take this course, students must be comfortable with statistics, linear algebra, calculus, and microeconomics. Prerequisites: BUSF-SHU 101 Statistics for Business and Economics and ECON-SHU 150 Microeconomics.

Microeconomics, ECON-SHU 3 (4 credits)

Offered Summer Session I. Instructor: Offer Shapir

This course is a rigorous, quantitative introduction to financial market structures and financial asset valuation. The main topics of the course are financial markets, arbitrage, portfolio selection, equilibrium asset pricing, fixed income securities and option pricing. You are expected to understand valuation formulas and be able to apply them to new problems. The appropriate tools necessary for solving these problems will be developed at each stage and practiced in the homework assignments. The models we will cover have immediate applications and implications for real-world financial decisions. To take this course, students must be comfortable with statistics, linear algebra, calculus, and microeconomics. Prerequisites: Calculus (MATH-SHU 121 or 201).

Creative Learning Design, INTM-SHU 236A (4 credits)

Offered Summer Session I. Instructor: Alex Ruthmann

In this course, students will work in teams to design digital learning resources and experience designs at the intersection of music, coding, arts, and technology. The course will begin with an introduction to emerging trends in learner engagement and design-based research, especially related to web- and mobile-based musical experiences and principles of making music with new media. Innovations in and applications of musical creativity, interactive technologies, user-centered design & engagement, scaffolded learning, creative learning, pedagogies of play and making, and educational entrepreneurship in Chinese contexts will also be explored. The market for creative educational experiences in afterschool settings for youth in China is exploding. For-profit educational service companies are competing and searching for differentiated, learning experiences in music, coding, and creative project based learning that will attract high-paying parents looking for the best supplemental education for their children. This practical, hands-on course will explore questions such as: How can we design engaging, creative learning experiences that are relevant to the cultural goals and needs of today’s youth in China, while laying the foundation for creative learning for the workforce of tomorrow? What are engaging, effective creative learning resources, and how are they best implemented in Chinese learning settings? How can we take advantage of young people’s near ubiquitous love of music and technology to facilitate creative learning? Students will work together in teams and paired with a partner audience of learners and teachers in Shanghai drawn from local and regional international schools (e.g. Alibaba’s Cloud Valley), local afterschool programs (e.g., Music Lab), and cultural partners (e.g., Shanghai Symphony). Together they will assess the needs and opportunities of partner students and teachers, and engage in a two-stage iterative and reflective co-design process prototyping custom learning resources and experience designs with their partner end users. At the end of the course, students will present and demo their learning resources as part of a public showcase to an external audience of partners, educators, technologists, musicians, entrepreneurs, and experience designers in Shanghai.

Journalism and Society in China, CCCF-SHU 133 (4 credits)

Offered Summer Session I. Instructor: David Maguire

This four credit course examines the role and functions of journalists and the media in Chinese society as modern reporting moves into the digital media landscape. To provide context to the political and cultural environment of news-gathering, the course assesses the development of journalism in China through the 20th century from around the birth of the Republic of China (1911) and through to the modern era. It will examine the relatively free publishing environment for newspapers in the lead-up to establishment of the People’s Republic of China (1949) and the imposition of government control thereafter. Through providing an understanding of the parallel publishing environment of institutional traditional media ownership and today’s free-enterprise online media corporations, the unit studies how reporters operate in both. Students will gain an understanding of the strong nexus between government and media and the ever-present need for journalists to portray various aspects of Chinese ideology at the same time as functioning as news reporters. The portrayal of media as propagandist will be considered against the abiding devotion of journalists to lift the veils on truth. The roles, functions and rounds of journalism as practiced in China will be studied through class discussion and assignments and these will include reporting across all publishing platforms of politics, business, the environment and national issues. The impact of digital journalism will be an underlying theme through the course. The course structure will involve lectures, workshops, seminars, guest speakers and an industry visit. There will be two 3-hour classes per week. Assignments will include a blend of in-class group and individual presentations and two written papers.

Woodblock Printmaking, ART-SHU 274 (cancelled)

This course has been cancelled for the summer program.

Introduction to Computer Programming, CSCI-SHU 11 (4 credits)

Offered Summer Session I. Instructor: Olivier Marin

An introduction to the fundamentals of computer programming. Students design, write, and debug computer programs. No prior knowledge of programming is assumed. Students will learn programming using Python, a general purpose, cross-platform programming language with a clear, readable syntax. Most class periods will be part lecture, part lab as you explore ideas and put them into practice. This course is suitable for students not intending in majoring in computer science as well as for students intending to major in computer science but having no programming experience. Students with previous programming experience should instead take Introduction to Computer Science. Prerequisite: None.

Nutrition, Fitness and Health, BIOL-SHU 5 (4 credits)

Offered Summer Session I. Instructor: Nataliya Galifianakis

Only in times of illness we usually realize that our most valuable possession is our health. To be in good health doesn’t mean simply to be disease free. This course will focus on the essential role and interaction of exercise and diet in achieving total fitness and wellness. The students will build a strong understanding of the foundations of exercise physiology and nutrition. Students will learn how to evaluate their own wellness level with respect to various wellness components, such as fitness level and nutritional status and will build their own personalized program to maintain their health.

Principles of Financial Accounting, BUSF-SHU 250 (4 credits)

Offered Summer Session I. Instructor: Yakun Wang

Develops students’ abilities to understand business transactions and financial statements and to determine the most appropriate financial measures for these events. Investigates the underlying rationale for accounting practices and assesses their effectiveness in providing useful information for decision making. Emphasis is placed on accounting practices that purport to portray corporate financial position, operating results, cash flows, manager performance, and financial strength.

Topics in Business: Chinese and International Accounting, BUSF-SHU 220A (2 credits)

Offered Summer Session I. Instructor: Yakun Wang

During the past decade, the world has witnessed one of the most significant changes ever happened to corporate financial reporting - the global adoption of IFRS (International Financial Reporting Standard). So far, nearly 70 countries (including all EU countries) have mandated IFRS for their listed companies, and about 40 countries are in the process of converging to IFRS. China started its convergence to IFRS in 2007, and by 2010 the Chinese Accounting Standards (CAS) were about three-quarters of the way towards full agreement with IFRS. With tremendous changes in accounting standards around the world, students who want to succeed in an era of globalization must be able to read and interpret financial statements prepared under different accounting standards. The main objective of this course is to increase students’ awareness of the broad spectrum of alternative approaches to accounting systems in the world and why they exist. To achieve this goal, this course will discuss knowledge of International Financial Reporting Standards, including its history, new standard adoption, the recording of financial transactions, and financial statement presentation, with an emphasize on China’s convergence to IFRS and existing differences between IFRS and US-GAAP. Students will also explore concurrent issues in standard setting in the main economies such as China, the EU, and the United States which will help them develop the ability to conduct an analysis of financial reports prepared under different accounting standards. Prerequisite: BUSF-SHU 250 (Principles of Financial Accounting).

Professional Responsibility & Leadership, BUSF-SHU 221 (cancelled)

This course has been cancelled for the summer program.

Private Voice Instruction, MUS-SHU 1512 (cancelled)

This course has been cancelled for the summer program.

 

Private Piano Lesson, MUS-SHU 56 (cancelled)

This course has been cancelled for the summer program.

 

Content Course Offerings (Session II)

Discrete Mathematics, CSCI-SHU 2314 (4 credits)

Offered Summer Session II. Instructor: Godfried Toussaint

This course is an introduction to discrete mathematics, emphasizing proof and abstraction, as well as applications to the computational sciences. Topics include sets, relations, and functions, graphs and trees, algorithms, proof techniques, and order of magnitude analysis, Boolean algebra and combinatorial circuits, formal logic and languages, automata, and combinatorics, probability, and statistics. Co-requisite MATH-SHU 121 or MATH-SHU 201. Equivalent to MATH-UA 120.

Modern China in a Global Context, HIST-SHU 179 (4 credits)

Offered Summer Session II. Instructor: Miao Feng

This course situates changes in China since the 1800s in a global context. Through reading primary texts and secondary studies, students will explore how the processes of global trade, empire-making, global capitalist expansion, anti-capitalist and nationalist revolutions, and economic liberalization shaped the social, cultural and political changes in modern China since the 1800s. The class will also explore how the city and the rural became a modern problem and remains to be a useful perspective to understand the social, cultural and political changes in modern and contemporary China. We will have several guest speakers and a local docent who will join our class field trip. We will also screen and discuss several films including a talkie. This course is also designed to help develop the skills to identify, analyze and critically evaluate primary and secondary sources. All the readings are in English, and the course presumes no previous knowledge of China.

US-China Relations, SOCS-SHU 275 (4 credits)

Offered Summer Session II. Instructor: Ivan Willis Rasmussen

This course examines the complexities of the bilateral relationship between the People’s Republic of China (China) and the United States (US), focusing on the historical rapport, major debates, and current relations. Topics include Sino-US economic relations, media reporting, variation in political systems, global politics, climate/energy issues, military affairs, and contested territories.

Entrepreneurship Explored, BUSF-SHU 232 (4 credits)

Offered Summer Session II. Instructor: Eliot Gattegno

An entrepreneur is someone who is always on the lookout for problems that can be turned into opportunities and finds creative ways to leverage limited resources to reach their goals. In this course, students will explore fundamental concepts, theories, and frameworks of entrepreneurship. Through cases, articles, guest entrepreneurs and team challenges, students will gain expertise in how to identify and evaluate opportunities; interpret, analyze, and build financial models; live life as an entrepreneurial leader; and create a new product or service. This course is not just for students who want to be entrepreneurs. Anyone who wants to create and sustain positive change should enroll. Prerequisite: None

Microbes, CCEX-SHU 119 (cancelled)

This course has been cancelled for the summer program.

Business Analytics, BUSF-SHU 210 (4 credits)

Offered Summer Session II. Instructor: Jiawei Zhang

Business analytics refers to the scientific process of transforming data into insight for making better decisions. Business analytics has enabled many businesses, nonprofits, and governments to improve their routine activities, to identify long-run decision opportunities, and sometimes to rethink the whole of their activities. In this sense, business analytics has tactical and strategic value; it is an important factor of value creation. This course introduces the basic concepts, principles and techniques of business analytics. In the first part of the course, we focus on prescriptive analytics, i.e., the use of optimization to support decision-making in the presence of a large number of alternatives and business constraints. In the second part, we focus on predictive analytics, i.e., how to use data to develop insights and predictive capabilities using machine learning, data mining, Monte Carlo simulation, and forecasting techniques. The course is entirely hands-on. You will learn how to apply business analytics to a wide array of business decision problems with the help of spreadsheet models. Examples will be drawn from production planning, inventory management, project management, advertising planning, customer retention, pricing and revenue management, capital budgeting, investment portfolio optimization, risk management, among others. The emphasis will be on model formulation and interpretation of results, not on mathematical theory.

Intro to Computer Science, CSCI-SHU 101 (4 credits)

Offered Summer Session II. Instructor: Joyce Fu

This course has three goals. First, the mastering of a modern object-oriented programming language, enough to allow students to tackle real-world problems of important significance. Second, gaining an appreciation of computational thinking, a process that provides the foundations for solving real-world problems. Finally, providing an overview of the very diverse and exciting field of computer science - a field which, arguably more than any other, impacts how we work, live, and play today. Prerequisite: Introduction to Computer Programming. Equivalency: This course counts for CSCI-UA 101.

Topics in Humanities: Language and Identity: Issues of Race, Gender, and Sexuality, HUMN-SHU 230 (cancelled)

This course has been cancelled for the summer program.

Design Thinking, BUSF-SHU 211 (4 credits)

Offered Summer Session II. Instructor: Eliot Gattegno

Design Thinking is a novel approach to problem-solving that can be applied to any discipline. It is used to rapidly develop concepts, products, services, strategies, and systems that are both innovative and responsive to user needs and desires. In this course, we will deepen your knowledge of market research to understand and explore different approaches to new product design and market introduction using design thinking. Throughout we will delve into the conception, design, planning, and forecasting phases of new product design and market introduction. In addition, we will seat this in the larger context of the firm and its strategies for development and growth.

Introduction to Contemporary Chinese Art, CCCF-SHU 135 (4 credits)

Offered Summer Session II. Instructor: Rebecca Ehrenwirth

Where does Art begin? Are Qin Shihuangdi’s detailed Terracotta-warriors Art or rather mass products for a megalomaniac ruler? And why are the artist who made those sculptures so unimportant? Whereas contemporary Art screams for individuality and creativity and focuses its attention to the artist, the creators in earlier times seem to be irrelevant. However, patterns, motives, forms or whole concepts are often recycled and reconstructed. The goal of this course is to get an overview of contemporary Chinese Art and take a look at the models from earlier times. We will not only talk about Art but also see it by visiting M50 and other Art Spaces in China.