Summer Session Courses

Chinese Language Courses (available in Sessions I and II)
Elementary Chinese Courses

Elementary Chinese II, CHIN-SHU 102 (4 credits)

Instructor: Ku Xia (Summer Session II)

Equivalent to CHINL-AD 102 Elementary Chinese 2; EAST-UA 202 Elementary Chinese II
Fulfills General Elective
Prerequisite: CHIN-SHU 101 Elementary Chinese I or CHIN-SHU 101S2 Elementary Chinese I - FoS 2

This course is the second part of a one-year elementary-level Chinese course designed for students who have completed NYU-SH’s Elementary Chinese I or equivalent. It is designed to reinforce and further develop language skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing as it relates to everyday life situations. The objectives of the course are: (1) to continue mastering the Chinese phonetic system (pinyin and tones); (2) to become further familiarized with the construction of commonly used Chinese Characters (both simplified and traditional); (3) to understand and use correctly basic Chinese grammar and sentence structures; (4) to continue building up essential vocabulary; (5) to read and write level appropriate passages (150-200 characters long); and (6) to become acquainted with aspects of Chinese culture and society related to the course materials. 

Format: In-Person
Course schedule: 08:30 -- 11:30 AM Mon, Tue, Thu, Fri

Intermediate Chinese Courses

Intermediate Chinese I, CHIN-SHU 201 (4 credits)

Instructor: Xiaoya Gu (Summer Session I)

Equivalent to CHINL-AD 201 Intermediate Chinese 1; EAST-UA 203 Intermediate Chinese I
Fulfills General Elective
Prerequisite: CHIN-SHU 102 Elementary Chinese II

This course is the first part of a one-year intermediate-level Chinese course designed for students who have completed NYU-SH’s Elementary Chinese II or equivalent. It is designed to consolidate and develop overall aural-oral proficiency. Objectives are: (1) to be able to obtain information from more extended conversation; (2) to express and expound on, in relative length, feelings and opinions on common topics; (3) to develop vocabulary needed to discuss common topics and begin learning to decipher meaning of compound words; (4) to develop reading comprehension of more extended narrative and expository passages; (5) to write, in relative length (200-250 characters long), personal narratives, informational narratives, comparison and discussion of viewpoints with level-appropriate vocabulary and grammatical accuracy, as well as basic syntactical cohesion; (6) to continue being acquainted with aspects of Chinese culture and society related to the course materials. 

Format: In-Person
Course schedule: 08:30 -- 11:30 AM Mon, Tue, Thu, Fri

Intermediate Chinese II, CHIN-SHU 202 (4 credits)

Instructor: Xiaoli Jin (Summer Session I); Ying Song (Summer Session II)

Equivalent to CHINL-AD 202 Intermediate Chinese 2; EAST-UA 204 Intermediate Chinese II
Fulfills Core Curriculum Language
Prerequisite: CHIN-SHU 201 Intermediate Chinese I

This course is the second part of a one-year intermediate-level Chinese course designed for students who have completed NYU-SH’s Intermediate Chinese I or equivalent. It is designed to continue consolidating and developing overall aural-oral proficiency, gradually focusing more on semi-formal or formal linguistic expressions. Objectives are: (1) to further develop competence in obtaining information from more extended conversation; (2) to express and expound on, in more extended length, feelings and opinions on socio-cultural topics; (3) to develop more specialized vocabulary needed to discuss sociocultural topics; (4) to improve students’ ability to decipher meaning of compound words; (5) to further develop reading comprehension of extended narrative, expository and simple argumentative passages; (6) to learn to solve simple syntactical problems independently; (7) to write, in relative length (250-300) characters long) informational narratives, expository and simple argumentative passages with level-appropriate vocabulary and grammatical accuracy, as well as basic syntactical cohesion; and (8) to continue being acquainted with aspects of Chinese culture and society related to the course materials. 

Format: In-Person
Course schedule: 08:30 -- 11:30 AM Mon, Tue, Thu, Fri 

Advanced Chinese Courses

Advanced Chinese I for Non-Heritage Students​, CHIN-SHU 301 (4 credits)

Instructor: Jie Yuan (Summer Session I); Ye Lu (Summer Session II)

Equivalent to CHINL-AD 301 Advanced Chinese 1; EAST-UA 205 Advanced Chinese 1

Prerequisite: CHIN-SHU 202 OR CHIN-SHU 211. Fulfillment: Core Curriculum Language; GCS Major Requirement Language Courses For Advanced GCS Track Non-Native Chinese Speakers. 

This course is the first part of a one-year Advanced Chinese course designed for students who have successfully completed Intermediate Chinese II at NYU-SH, or who have at least the equivalent knowledge of Chinese upon registration. It is designed to reinforce and further improve students’ overall communicative competence by incorporating semi-formal or formal usages. The objectives of the course are: (1) to learn to apply formal linguistic expressions in speaking and writing; (2) to acquire specialized vocabulary and patterns necessary for conducting formal discussions of socio-cultural topics; (3) to develop reading comprehension of texts with more advanced syntax; (4) to learn to make context-based guess about the meaning of a new word and further enhance students’ ability to analyze as well as produce sentences with more complex syntactical features; (5) to learn to write expository and argumentative passages in more extended length; and (6) to learn to employ basic rhetoric devices in writing. 

Format: In-Person
Course schedule: 08:30 -- 11:30 AM Mon, Wed, Fri

Advanced Chinese II for Non-Heritage Students​, CHIN-SHU 302 (4 credits)

Instructor: Chao Fu (Summer Session I); Xiaoyue Huang (Summer Session II)

Equivalent to CHINL-AD 302 Advanced Chinese 2; EAST-UA 206 Advanced Chinese 2

Prerequisite CHIN-SHU 301. Fulfillment: Core Curriculum Language; GCS Major Requirement Language Courses For Advanced GCS Track Non-Native Chinese Speakers.

This course is the second part of a one-year Advanced Chinese course designed for students who have successfully completed Advanced Chinese I at NYU-SH, or who have the equivalent knowledge of Chinese upon registration. It is designed to reinforce and further improve students’ overall communicative competence by incorporating semi-formal or formal usages. The objectives of the course are: (1) to enhance further students’ oral and written communicative competence using formal linguistic expressions; (2) to expand further specialized vocabulary and patterns necessary for conducting formal discussions of socio-cultural topics relevant to today’s China; (3) to improve further students’ reading comprehension of texts with more advanced syntax; (4) to develop further their competence in making context-based guess about the meaning of a new word, and further enhance ability to analyze as well as produce sentences with more complex syntactical features; (5) to improve further their ability to write expository and argumentative passages in more extended length; (6) to improve their ability to effectively employ basic rhetoric devices in writing. 

Format: In-Person
Course schedule: 08:30 -- 11:30 AM Mon, Wed, Fri

Summer Session I Courses (May 23-June 30, 2023)
Business Courses

Chinese Financial Markets, BUSF-SHU 286 (4 credits)

Instructors: Han Shen Lin

Fulfills BUSF China Business Studies or Finance elective; BUSM China Business Studies or Non-Marketing elective; IMB Business elective
Prerequisites: BUSF-SHU 202 Foundations of Finance or BUSF-SHU 5 Principles of Finance

This course introduces the institutions, instruments, and empirical regularities of Chinese financial markets and the role these markets play in the broader Chinese economy. The goal of the course is to provide students with a comprehensive understanding of Chinese financial markets. It focuses on current issues and debates about Chinese financial markets, including the Chinese banking system, RMB exchange rates, Chinese stock markets and bond markets, mutual fund and hedge fund industry, Chinese derivative markets and other important topics. The similarities and differences between Chinese financial markets and more developed markets will be highlighted. 

Format: In-Person
Course schedule: 01:00 -- 04:00 PM Tue, Thu (Lecture), 04:05 -- 05:05 PM Tue, Thu (Recitation)

Computer Science Courses

Introduction to Computer Programming, CSCI-SHU 11 (4 credits)

Instructor: Lihua Xu

Equivalent to CSCI-UA 1 Introduction to Computer Programming. Note: Students who have already taken Introduction to Computer Science may not take this course
Fulfills Computer Science Major Required Course and Algorithmic Thinking (AT) Core Curriculum
Prerequisite: C in Pre-Calculus or placement out of Pre-Calculus


An introduction to the fundamentals of computer programming. Students design, write, and debug computer programs. No prior knowledge of programming is assumed. Students will learn programming using Python, a general purpose, cross-platform programming language with a clear, readable syntax. Most class periods will be part lecture, part lab as you explore ideas and put them into practice. This course is suitable for students not intending in majoring in computer science as well as for students intending to major in computer science but having no programming experience. Students with previous programming experience should instead take Introduction to Computer Science. 

Format: In-Person
Course schedule: 08:30 -- 11:30 AM Mon, Wed (Lecture), 11:35 -- 12:35 PM Mon, Wed (Laboratory) 

Data Structures, CSCI-SHU 210 (4 credits)

Instructor: Olivier Marin

Equivalent to CS-UH 1050 Data Structures; CSCI-UA 102 Data Structures
Fulfills Required CS/CE/DS Course
Prerequisite: ICS OR A- in ICP. This course is taught in Python and assumes full knowledge of Python


Data structures are fundamental programming constructs which organize information in computer memory to solve challenging real-world problems. Data structures such as stacks, queues, linked lists, and binary trees, therefore constitute building blocks that can be reused, extended, and combined in order to make powerful programs. This course teaches how to implement them in a high-level language, how to analyze their effect on algorithm efficiency, and how to modify them to write computer programs that solve complex problems in a most efficient way. Programming assignments. 

Format: In-Person
Course schedule: 08:30 -- 11:30 AM Tue, Thu (Lecture), 11:35 -- 12:35 PM Tue, Thu (Laboratory)

Databases, CSCI-SHU 213 (4 credits)

Instructor: Lihua Xu

Fulfills Computer Science Elective; Data Science Major Required Courses
Prerequisite: CSCI-SHU 210 Data Structures


The course covers modeling an application and logical database design, the relational model and relational data definition and data manipulation languages, design of relational databases and normalization theory, physical database design, query processing and optimization, transaction processing focusing on concurrency and recovery. The labs emphasize experiential learning of database systems and applications and an insight into various database management systems and query languages.

Format: In-Person
Course schedule: 02:00 -- 05:00 PM Mon, Wed

Economics Courses

International Trade and the Chinese Economy, ECON-SHU 218 (4 credits)

Instructor: Nan Xu

Fulfills Core Curriculum Social Science Perspective on China; Social Science Major Focus Courses Political Economy - 200 level; Economics electives
Prerequisites: ECON-SHU 3 Microeconomics and ECON-SHU 1 Principles of Macroeconomics


This course is designed to combine basic trade theory with its practical relevance in China to help students better understand the international economic activities in developing countries. We will investigate the causes and consequences of trade, discuss the role of multinational corporations and foreign direct investment in driving economic growth and wage inequality, and study countries' motives for regulating international trade and the effects of trade policy on economic welfare. We will also focus on China's gains and losses from opening up to trade and investment, on the dual impacts of the rise in exports from China on the U.S. employment and consumers, on the distributional effects of tariff cuts in developing countries, and so on. 

Format: In-Person
Course Schedule: 01:00 -- 04:00 PM Tue, Thu 

Antitrust and Competition Policy in the Digital Era, ECON-SHU 356 (4 credits)

Instructor: Yu (Amanda) Zhou

Fulfills Economics electives
Prerequisites: ECON-SHU 3 Microeconomics

Law and Economics presents an economic analysis of monopoly power and efforts to limit monopoly. This course helps students understand the theoretical rationale for competition policy in the classical price-centric economy and the recent new economy. The course also provides students with an understanding of competition policy and antitrust regulation by examining recent, prominent public and private antitrust cases.

Format: In-Person
Course Schedule: 01:00 -- 04:00 PM Mon, Wed 

Humanities Courses

Oral History: Method and Practice, HIST-SHU 103 (4 credits)

Instructor: Shuang Wen

This course seeks to spark and develop curiosity in historical research with easy to practice and accessible primary sources collected from oral history interviews. Students will receive comprehensive training on: 1) What is oral history; 2) How did this research methodology develop in the English and Chinese academy; 3) What are the differences and similarities between oral history, social science survey questionnaires, anthropological field work, and journalism; 4) How to prepare for the interview; 5) Important issues to be aware of during the interview; 6) Post-interview preservation of photos and memorabilia, audio and video files; audio transcript and video footage editing; and 7) How to use the data collected from oral history interviews for publication.

Format: In-Person
Course schedule: 09:00 AM -- 12:00 PM Mon, Wed

Fashion and Body Politics in 20th Century East Asia, HIST-SHU 144 (4 credits)

Instructor: Emilie Yuki Takayama

This is an introductory-level course on the social and cultural history of clothing and the body in twentieth-century East Asia with a special focus on China and Japan, as well as Korea. We will trace how sartorial markers and understandings of the body transformed with the onset of modernity. We will explore themes such as the politics of hair, foot binding, the role of clothing in defining class, gender and nationhood. We will also evaluate the effects of globalization on fashion in the region. We will read secondary literature that explores the significance of clothing and the body, as well as a selection of primary sources. 

Format: In-Person
Course schedule: 09:00 AM -- 12:00 PM Tue, Thu

 

Mathematics Courses

Calculus I, MATH-SHU 121 (4 credits)

Instructor: Andrew Swan

Please note that this course is not equivalent to MATH-SHU 131 Calculus (formerly MATH-SHU 121) and will not be recognized as fulfilling the Calculus prerequisites of higher-level MATH-SHU courses. Students pursuing the following majors will therefore not be able to use MATH-SHU 131 to fulfill major requirements: Economics, Natural Sciences, Mathematics, Data Science, Computer Science, Engineering.
Prerequisite: Placement examination or a grade of C or above in MATH–SHU 009 Precalculus

This course presents the foundations of calculus for functions of a single variable. Topics addressed include limits, continuity, rules of differentiation, antiderivatives, definite integrals, and the fundamental theorem of calculus.  

Format: In-Person
Course schedule: 01:00 -- 04:00 PM Mon, Wed (Lecture), 04:05 -- 05:25 PM Mon, Wed (Recitation)

Social Science Courses

Introduction to Psychology, PSYC-SHU 101 (4 credits)

Instructor: Lixian Cui

Equivalent to PSYCH-UA 1 Intro to Psychology
Fulfills Experimental Discovery in the Natural World (ED) Core Curriculum, and Social Science Major Foundational course; Data Science concentration in Social Science/Psychology


This course highlights the fundamental principles and interesting experiments within the field of psychology, aiming to help students understand mind and behavior of themselves and others. It provides a comprehensive overview of scientific study of thought and behavior, covering a wide range of topics such as the biological and evolutionary bases of behavior, sensation and perception, learning, memory, intelligence and thinking, lifespan development, emotion and motivation, human personality, social behavior, behavioral disorders, and psychological treatment of disorders. Opportunities to apply knowledge gained in class are available through various in-class and out-of-class activities. By the end of this course you will have gained a much better understanding and appreciation of who you are and how you work.

Format: In-Person
Course schedule: 01:00 -- 04:00 PM Tue, Thu (Lecture), 04:05 -- 04:25 PM Tue, Thu (Laboratory)

Fundamentals of Spatial Analytics, SOCS-SHU 205 (4 credits)

Instructor: Jiayong Liang

Prerequisite: None. Sophomore status is recommended but not required

Recent advances in spatial data science have changed how we do almost everything, from calling a cab, ordering food delivery, to managing complex networks of supply chains. These new applications generate vast amounts of spatial data. To make sense of spatial data, we need spatial analytics, a framework and a toolbox to analyze the locations of, distances and interactions between spatial objects. This course introduces different types of spatial data and reviews a range of geospatial methods to explore spatial data. Important concepts in spatial thinking, cartography, geographic information science, and remote sensing will be introduced and discussed with real-world examples and lab exercises. This course also provides tools to generate spatial insights in other disciplines, such as economics, public policy studies, sociology, anthropology, political science, environmental and urban studies. 

Format: In-Person
Course schedule: 01:00 -- 04:00 PM Tue, Thu (Lecture), 04:05 -- 05:05 PM Tue, Thu (Laboratory)

Finding Sociology in Chinese Cities: Shanghai and Hong Kong, SOCS-SHU 278 (4 credits)

Instructor: Xiaogang Wu

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or above
Fulfills Core SSPC/IPC; Social Science focus Sociology or Urban Studies 200 level

This course combines historical narratives/documents, on-site observations, and statistical analyses to bring a specific set of Chinese cities (Shanghai and Hong Kong) to the fore of sociological analyses. Students are guided to read literatures in social science disciplines (primarily from sociology) on globalization, population and migration/immigration, inequalities/poverty, class, gender and family, neighborhood and housing, and urban social life and culture, to develop comparative and analytical frameworks to account for the similarities and differences between the two Chinese cities and beyond, and to gain contextual and deep understanding of social changes in China from the perspective of cities. After taking this course, students will be equipped with the historical background, comparative perspectives, and analytical skills to analyze complex issues in urban transformation and its impact on human life in the two cities.

Format: In-Person
Course schedule: 01:00 -- 04:00 PM Mon, Wed

World Language Courses

Intensive Elementary Japanese, JAPN-SHU 5 (4 credits)

Instructor: Kaoruko Minamoto

Fulfills General Elective 
Prerequisite: None


Introductory course in modern spoken and written Japanese, designed to develop fundamental skills in areas of speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Gives contextualized instructions to develop both communicative and cultural competency. Systematically introduces the Japanese writing system (Hiragana, Katakana, and Kanji). Open to students with no previous training in Japanese and to others on assignment by placement test. 

Note that these courses are intensive, condensing 1 semester of language study into 6 weeks. Students are expected to spend significant amount of time outside of the class every day to complete daily homework and review/practice material covered in class that day.

Format: In-Person
Course schedule: 01:00 -- 04:10 PM Mon, Tue, Thu, Fri 

Elementary Spanish I, SPAN-SHU 1 (4 credits)

Instructor: David Pardo Cossío

Fulfills General Elective 
Prerequisite: None


Open to students with no previous training in Spanish and to others on assignment by placement test. Beginning course designed to teach the elements of Spanish grammar and language structure through a primarily oral approach. Emphasis is on building vocabulary and language patterns to encourage spontaneous language use in and out of the classroom. 

Format: In-Person
Course schedule: 01:00 -- 04:00 PM Mon, Tue, Thu, Fri 

Summer Session II Courses (July 3-August 11, 2023)
Business Courses

Foundations of Finance, BUSF-SHU 202 (4 credits)

Instructor: Xuyuanda Qi

Equivalent to ECON-UH 2510 Foundations of Financial Markets; FINC-UB 2 Foundations of Finance
Fulfills Business Core Course
Prerequisites: BUSF-SHU 101 Statistics for Business and Economics and ECON-SHU 150 Microeconomics


This course is a rigorous, quantitative introduction to financial market structures and financial asset valuation. The main topics of the course are financial markets, arbitrage, portfolio selection, equilibrium asset pricing, fixed income securities and option pricing. You are expected to understand valuation formulas and be able to apply them to new problems. The appropriate tools necessary for solving these problems will be developed at each stage and practiced in the homework assignments. The models we will cover have immediate applications and implications for real-world financial decisions. To take this course, students must be comfortable with statistics, linear algebra, calculus, and microeconomics.​

Format: In-Person
Course Schedule: 01:00 -- 04:00 PM Tue, Thu (Lecture), 04:05 -- 05:05 PM Tue, Thu (Recitation)

Principles of Financial Accounting, BUSF-SHU 250 (4 credits)

Instructor: Sunqian Ren

Fulfills BUSF/BUSM Major core /Business Accounting track; IMB Business required Foundation /elective; Data Science concentration in Finance/Marketing. It can count for the CAS Business Studies Minor
Prerequisites: Not open to freshmen

Develops students’ abilities to understand business transactions and financial statements and to determine the most appropriate financial measures for these events. Investigates the underlying rationale for accounting practices and assesses their effectiveness in providing useful information for decision making. Emphasis is placed on accounting practices that purport to portray corporate financial position, operating results, cash flows, manager performance, and financial strength. 

Format: In-Person
Course schedule: 01:00 -- 04:00 PM Mon, Wed (Lecture), 04:05 -- 05:05 PM Mon, Wed (Recitation)

Computer Science Courses

Introduction to Computer and Data Science, CSCI-SHU 101 (4 credits)

Instructor: Xianbin Gu

Equivalent to CSCI-UA 101 Introduction to Computer Science
Fulfills Core Curriculum Requirement Algorithmic Thinking; Computer Science Major Required Courses; Computer Systems Engineering Major Required Courses; Data Science Major Foundational Courses; Electrical and Systems Engineering Major Required Major Courses

Prerequisite: CSCI-SHU 11 Introduction to Computer Programming (ICP) or CS placement exam

This course has three goals. First, the mastering of a modern object-oriented programming language, enough to allow students to tackle real-world problems of important significance. Second, gaining an appreciation of computational thinking, a process that provides the foundations for solving real-world problems. Finally, providing an overview of the very diverse and exciting field of computer science - a field which, arguably more than any other, impacts how we work, live, and play today. 

Format: In-Person
Course schedule: 08:30 -- 11:30 AM Mon, Wed (Lecture), 11:35 AM -- 12:35 PM Mon, Wed (Laboratory) 

Discrete Mathematics, CSCI-SHU 2314 (4 credits)

Instructor: Pingping Ding

Equivalent to MATH-UA 120
Fulfills MATH Additional Mathematics Electives, CS Required, Data Science Concentration in CS
Corequisite or Prerequisite:  MATH-SHU 131 or MATH-SHU 201


This course is an introduction to discrete mathematics, emphasizing proof and abstraction, as well as applications to the computational sciences. Topics include sets, relations, and functions, graphs and trees, algorithms, proof techniques, and order of magnitude analysis, Boolean algebra and combinatorial circuits, formal logic and languages, automata, and combinatorics, probability, and statistics. 

Format: In-Person
Course schedule: 08:30 -- 11:30 AM Tue, Thu (Lecture), 11:35 AM -- 12:35 PM Tue, Thu (Recitation) 

Economics Courses

Microeconomics, ECON-SHU 3 (4 credits)

Instructor: Weiwei Weng

Equivalent to ECON-UA 2 Intro to Microeconomics
Prerequisites: Calculus (MATH-SHU 121 or 201)


Economics studies how agents make decisions under conditions of scarcity and uncertainty. This course provides a rigorous introduction to economics, with special emphasis on microeconomics. It will introduce you to economics as a discipline and as a way of thinking. It will also provide you with a set of tools, which will be very useful in other economics courses. We will first study the behavior of individual consumers and firms. Then we will give you some insight into how markets work and whether market outcomes are desirable. We will also look at situations in which the firm is a monopolist, or competes with a limited number of rivals. Some key concepts we will introduce include economic incentives, marginal analysis, opportunity cost (which costs matter), market efficiency (what does it mean for a market to work) and strategic behavior (how to predict and respond to your rivals’ decisions). The tools that you will be acquainted with in this class are fundamental for most upper division courses of the Economics major as well as classes in Finance, Accounting and Marketing. 

Format: In-Person
Course Schedule: 01:00 -- 04:00 PM Mon, Wed (Lecture), 04:05 -- 05:05 PM Mon, Wed (Recitation)

Blockchain, Cryptocurrency, and Money, ECON-SHU 232 (4 credits)

Instructor: Ilaf Elard

Fulfills STS Core Curriculum
Prerequisites: Introduction to Computer Programming or Introduction to Computer Science or Creative Coding Lab

In this course, we will learn all about Blockchain and money. (1) We will first investigate questions about how to make money and how money used to be made; who can and who can’t make money in the modern economy; what money was and what money is today; how money moves; how to measure and how to control money. (2) Second, you will learn why, until the invention of Bitcoin, it has been so difficult to make new digital money; what Blockchains really are; how Blockchains work and when Blockchains don't work; how to raise money and how to make new digital money with Blockchains. You learn to build your own blockchain hands-on. You will thereby gain a solid and detailed technical understanding of Blockchain and the Blockchain-enabled financial technology. (3) Third, you will also learn about the most important current and future non-blockchain financial technologies.

Topics to be covered include: definition, functions, and theories of money; the historical evolution of money and digital money; money creation; payment systems; financial technology (FinTech); electronic wallets; online peer-to-peer lending (P2P); central bank digital currencies (CBDC); Blockchain and distributed ledger technology (DLT); basic cryptography; digital signatures; hashing; cryptocurrencies; cryptocurrency market; Bitcoin; Bitcoin security; consensus; Proof-of-Work (PoW); Proof-of-Stake (PoS); the economic limits of consensus protocols; stable coins; initial coin offerings (ICO); and non-fungible tokens (NFTs).

Format: In-Person
Course Schedule: 01:00 -- 04:00 PM Mon, Wed (Lecture), 04:05 -- 05:05 PM Mon, Wed (Recitation)

History of Modern Economic Growth: Exploring China From a Comparative Perspective, ECON-SHU 238 (4 credits)

Instructor: Ilaf Elard

Fulfills CORE SSPC or IPC; Economics elective; GCS elective The Politics, Economy, and Environment of China; Social Science Focus Political Economy 200 level course
Prerequisites: None

This course has two goals: 1) to provide an understanding of economic development and growth with applications to the Chinese economy and Chinese institutions, and (2) to learn how to analyse major policies in China's economic development in both oral and written form. China has experienced rapid institutional changes and achieved high growth rates. We start with (i) the pre-modern and early-modern historical background of this transition process and then move on to analyse (ii) the roots and pattern of economic growth in modern China. Topics include: The great divergence between poor and rich countries; introduction to global economic history; why the industrial revolution did not take place in China's Yangtze River Delta first; economic catch up by the rest of the West; state-led big push industrialization; the ancient Chinese economy's high-level equilibrium trap; the Needham Question; the Chinese economy prior to 1949; modern China's early reform era 1949-78; the developmental state; market transition post-1978; modern Chinese growth and structural change. 

Format: In-Person
Course Schedule: 01:00 -- 04:00 PM Tue, Thu

Interactive Media Arts Courses

Industrial Design in Action, INTM-SHU 129 (4 credits)

Instructor: Andy Garcia

Fulfills IMA/IMB Elective
Prerequisite: Interaction Lab or Communications Lab or Application Lab

Industrial Design in Action is a course that will help you bridge the gap between your ideas and their physical form. From initial research to conception, you will practice and apply different design methodologies that lead to creative and innovative ideas; acquire a fundamental understanding of form, function and design language; and utilize sketching and visual storytelling to communicate a message and features of a compelling product. In addition, you will become familiar with various Computer Aided Design (CAD) softwares; explore different types of materials for different uses and applications; and experiment with a myriad of fabrication techniques, from basic hand tools to advanced digital fabrication, you will learn to use the right tool for the job. Altogether these skills will enable you to go from prototype to a finished product. In a nutshell, this course is about designing and fabricating things we love. 

Format: In-Person
Course schedule: 01:15 -- 04:15 PM Tue, Thu

 

Mathematics Courses

Calculus, MATH-SHU 131 (4 credits)

Instructor: Manuel Rissel

Fulfills Economics Core Math requirement; Math Core Math requirement
Prerequisites: Pre-placement by Faculty based on high-school grades, OR NYU SH “Calculus and Linear Algebra” placement exam, OR grade C or better in MATH-SHU 9 (Precalculus) Antirequisite: MATH-SHU 201 (Honors Calculus) 

This course presents the foundations of calculus for functions of a single variable. Topics addressed include limits, continuity, rules of differentiation, approximation, antiderivatives, indefinite and definite integrals, the fundamental theorem of calculus, integration techniques, and improper integrals. 

Format: In-Person
Course schedule: 01:00 -- 04:00 PM Tue, Thu (Lecture), 04:05 -- 05:25 PM Tue, Thu (Recitation)

Social Science Courses

Psychology of Human-Machine Communication and Relationships, PSYC-SHU 344 (4 credits)

Instructor: Thomas Nyman

Fulfills Core STS; IMA/IMB Elective; Neural Science Elective; Social Science Focus Psychology 300 level
Prerequisite: PSYC-SHU 101 Introduction to psychology or NEUR-SHU 201 Introduction to Neural Science or CSCI-SHU 101 Introduction to Computer Science

From the perspective of psychological science, developments in machine-learning and AI raise many interesting questions. AI technologies are already proving useful in their ability to monitor and assess human behaviors, emotions, and decision patterns. This is becoming possible through the sheer volume of information available online in connection with individuals, groups, and through the sophistication of predictive algorithms that can see patterns that the human mind cannot. As AI systems, machines, and robots are increasingly built to mimic human beings, will we begin to communicate with, react to, or feel the same towards them as we do to other human beings? If an AI system can assist in an online purchase or a psychological intervention (e.g., a chatbot), can they also become our friends? Could we fall in love with an artificial agent or a robot? In this course, we use the lens of psychological science to investigate these and other aspects of human-machine communication and their effects on human-human relationships. 

Format: In-Person
Course schedule: 01:00 -- 04:00 PM Mon, Wed

US-China Relations, SOCS-SHU 275 (4 credits)

Instructor: Ivan Willis Rasmussen

Fulfills Core SSPC or IPC; GCS China and the World/The Politics, Economy, and Environment of China; SS Focus International Relations/Political Science 200 level; HUMN 18-19 Topic

This course examines the complexities of the bilateral relationship between the People’s Republic of China (China) and the United States (US), focusing on their historical rapport, major debates, and current relations. Topics include Sino-US economic relations, media reporting, variation in political systems, global politics, climate/energy issues, military affairs, and contested territories.

Format: In-Person
Course schedule: 01:00 -- 04:00 PM Tue, Thu