Summer Session Courses

Summer

2019 Summer Sessions

NYU Shanghai is offering all levels of intensive Chinese and many other content courses taught in English in Shanghai for summer 2019.

You can find a list of equivalencies on the NY & Shanghai Equivalency courses document, students should speak to their department and academic advisor to determine how a course might count towards their degree. 

Application Information
Tuition and Costs
Summer Chinese Language Immersion 9-week Program (Intermediate and Advanced Levels)

Chinese Language 6-week Courses (Offered in both Session I and Session II)

Elementary Chinese Courses (click here)

Elementary Chinese I, CHIN-SHU 101 (4 credits)

Equivalent to CHINL-AD 101 Elementary Chinese 1; EAST-UA 201 Elementary Chinese I

This course is the first part of a one-year elementary-level Chinese course designed for students who have no or almost no knowledge of Mandarin Chinese. It is designed to develop language skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing as it relates to everyday life situations. The objectives of the course are: (1) to master the Chinese phonetic system (pinyin and tones) with satisfactory pronunciation; (2) to understand the construction of commonly used Chinese Characters (both simplified and traditional) and learn to write them correctly; (3) to understand and use correct basic Chinese grammar and sentence structures; (4) to build up essential vocabulary; (5) to read and write level-appropriate passages (100-150 characters long); and (6) to become acquainted with aspects of Chinese culture and society related to the course materials.

Elementary Chinese II, CHIN-SHU 102 (4 credits)

Equivalent to CHINL-AD 102 Elementary Chinese 2; EAST-UA 202 Elementary Chinese II

This course is the second part of a one-year elementary-level Chinese course designed for students who have completed NYU-SH’s Elementary Chinese I or equivalent. It is designed to reinforce and further develop language skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing as it relates to everyday life situations. The objectives of the course are: (1) to continue mastering the Chinese phonetic system (pinyin and tones); (2) to become further familiarized with the construction of commonly used Chinese Characters (both simplified and traditional); (3) to understand and use correctly basic Chinese grammar and sentence structures; (4) to continue building up essential vocabulary; (5) to read and write level appropriate passages (150-200 characters long); and (6) to become acquainted with aspects of Chinese culture and society related to the course materials.

Elementary Chinese I For Advanced Beginners, CHIN-SHU 111 (4 credits)

Equivalent to EAST-UA 231 Elementary Chinese I for Advanced Beginners

This course is the first part of a one-year elementary-level Chinese course designed for students who can understand and speak conversational Chinese related to daily-life situations, but have not learned to read/write Chinese characters. This includes students who were raised in a non-Chinese speaking country but in a home where the Mandarin Chinese dialect was spoken, and/or students who have acquired a certain level of Mandarin Chinese language proficiency (primarily speaking and listening) by living or working in a Chinese speaking country/region for an extended time. Though speaking and listening will be an integral part of the course, the major focus will be on developing students’ competence in reading and writing. The objectives of the course are: 1) to master the Chinese phonetic system (pinyin and tones) with satisfactory pronunciation; 2) to understand the construction of commonly used Chinese Characters (both simplified and traditional) and write them correctly; 3) to build up essential vocabulary needed to read and write about topics covered in the textbook; 4) to understand and use correctly basic Chinese grammar and sentence structures; 5) to comprehend level appropriate passages and to be able to perform simple sentence analysis; 6) to write level appropriate essays (250-300 characters long) with grammatical, accuracy as well as cohesion and coherence; 7) to become acquainted with and be able to discuss in speech and writing aspects of Chinese culture and society related to the course materials. Prerequisite: None.

Intermediate Chinese Courses (click here)

Intermediate Chinese I, CHIN-SHU 201 (4 credits)

Equivalent to CHINL-AD 201 Intermediate Chinese 1; EAST-UA 203 Intermediate Chinese I

This course is the first part of a one-year intermediate-level Chinese course designed for students who have completed NYU-SH’s Elementary Chinese II or equivalent. It is designed to consolidate and develop overall aural-oral proficiency. Objectives are: (1) to be able to obtain information from more extended conversation; (2) to express and expound on, in relative length, feelings and opinions on common topics; (3) to develop vocabulary needed to discuss common topics and begin learning to decipher meaning of compound words; (4) to develop reading comprehension of more extended narrative and expository passages; (5) to write, in relative length (200-250 characters long), personal narratives, informational narratives, comparison and discussion of viewpoints with level-appropriate vocabulary and grammatical accuracy, as well as basic syntactical cohesion; (6) to continue being acquainted with aspects of Chinese culture and society related to the course materials.

Intermediate Chinese II, CHIN-SHU 202 (4 credits)

Equivalent to CHINL-AD 202 Intermediate Chinese 2; EAST-UA 204 Intermediate Chinese II

This course is the second part of a one-year intermediate-level Chinese course designed for students who have completed NYU-SH’s Intermediate Chinese I or equivalent. It is designed to continue consolidating and developing overall aural-oral proficiency, gradually focusing more on semi-formal or formal linguistic expressions. Objectives are: (1) to further develop competence in obtaining information from more extended conversation; (2) to express and expound on, in more extended length, feelings and opinions on socio-cultural topics; (3) to develop more specialized vocabulary needed to discuss sociocultural topics; (4) to improve students’ ability to decipher meaning of compound words; (5) to further develop reading comprehension of extended narrative, expository and simple argumentative passages; (6) to learn to solve simple syntactical problems independently; (7) to write, in relative length (250-300) characters long) informational narratives, expository and simple argumentative passages with level-appropriate vocabulary and grammatical accuracy, as well as basic syntactical cohesion; and (7) to continue being acquainted with aspects of Chinese culture and society related to the course materials.

Intermediate Chinese I For Advanced Beginners, CHIN-SHU 211 (4 credits)

Equivalent to EAST-UA 232 Intermediate Chinese I for Advanced Beginners

This course is designed for students who have at least one year of Chinese language learning at NYU and who, before registering for this course, already command above-elementary aural-oral proficiency in Mandarin Chinese. The objectives are: to be able to obtain information from extended written passages; to both express and expound on, in relative length, feelings and opinions on common social and cultural topics; to expand vocabulary and learn to decipher the meaning of compound words; to develop reading comprehension of extended expository and simple argumentative passages; to solve non-complex textual problems with the aid of dictionaries; to write in relative length personal narratives, informational narratives, comparison and discussion of viewpoints with level appropriate vocabulary and grammatical accuracy, as well as syntactical cohesion; to continue to become acquainted with aspects of Chinese culture and society related to the course materials. Prerequisite CHIN-111

Advanced Chinese Courses (click here)

Advanced Chinese I, CHIN-SHU 301 (4 credits)

Equivalent to CHINL-AD 301 Advanced Chinese 1; EAST-UA 205 Advanced Chinese 1

This course is the first part of a one-year Advanced Chinese course designed for students who have successfully completed Intermediate Chinese II at NYU-SH, or who have at least the equivalent knowledge of Chinese upon registration. It is designed to reinforce and further improve students’ overall communicative competence by incorporating semi-formal or formal usages. The objectives of the course are: (1) to learn to apply formal linguistic expressions in speaking and writing; (2) to acquire specialized vocabulary and patterns necessary for conducting formal discussions of socio-cultural topics; (3) to develop reading comprehension of texts with more advanced syntax; (4) to learn to make context-based guesses about the meaning of a new word and further enhance students’ ability to analyze as well as produce sentences with more complex syntactical features; (5) to learn to write expository and argumentative passages in more extended length; and (6) to learn to employ basic rhetoric devices in writing.

Advanced Chinese II, CHIN-SHU 302 (4 credits)

Equivalent to CHINL-AD 302 Advanced Chinese 2; EAST-UA 206 Advanced Chinese 2

This course is the second part of a one-year Advanced Chinese course designed for students who have successfully completed Advanced Chinese I at NYU-SH, or who have the equivalent knowledge of Chinese upon registration. It is designed to reinforce and further improve students’ overall communicative competence by incorporating semi-formal or formal usages. The objectives of the course are: (1) to enhance further students’ oral and written communicative competence using formal linguistic expressions; (2) to expand further specialized vocabulary and patterns necessary for conducting formal discussions of socio-cultural topics relevant to today’s China; (3) to improve further students’ reading comprehension of texts with more advanced syntax; (4) to develop further their competence in making context-based guess about the meaning of a new word, and further enhance ability to analyze as well as produce sentences with more complex syntactical features; (5) to improve further their ability to write expository and argumentative passages in more extended length; (6) to improve their ability to effectively employ basic rhetoric devices in writing.

Summer Session I Courses (May 28-July 5)

Business and Economics Courses (click here)

Principles of Financial Accounting, BUSF-SHU 250 (4 credits)

Offered Summer Session I. Instructor: Jing Dai

Equivalent to ECON-UH 1501 Introduction to Accounting; ACCT-UB 1 Principles of Accounting

Develops students’ abilities to understand business transactions and financial statements and to determine the most appropriate financial measures for these events. Investigates the underlying rationale for accounting practices and assesses their effectiveness in providing useful information for decision making. Emphasis is placed on accounting practices that purport to portray corporate financial position, operating results, cash flows, manager performance, and financial strength.

Foundations of Finance, BUSF-SHU 202 (4 credits)

Offered Summer Session I. Instructor: Offer Shapir

Equivalent to ECON-UH 2510 Foundations of Financial Markets; FINC-UB 2 Foundations of Finance

 This course is a rigorous, quantitative introduction to financial market structures and financial asset valuation. The main topics of the course are financial markets, arbitrage, portfolio selection, equilibrium asset pricing, fixed income securities and option pricing. You are expected to understand valuation formulas and be able to apply them to new problems. The appropriate tools necessary for solving these problems will be developed at each stage and practiced in the homework assignments. The models we will cover have immediate applications and implications for real-world financial decisions. To take this course, students must be comfortable with statistics, linear algebra, calculus, and microeconomics.
Prerequisites: BUSF-SHU 101 Statistics for Business and Economics and ECON-SHU 150 Microeconomics

Management and Organizations, MGMT-SHU 301 (4 credits)

Offered Summer Session I. Instructor: Raymond Ro

Equivalent to BUSOR-AD 115 Management & Organizations; MGMT-UB 1 (9001) Management & Organizations

This course addresses contemporary management challenges stemming from changing organizational structures, complex environmental conditions, new technological developments, and increasingly diverse workforces. It highlights critical management issues involved in planning, organizing, controlling, and leading an organization. Ultimately, it aims to strengthen students’ managerial potential by providing general frameworks for analyzing, diagnosing, and responding to both fundamental and complex organizational situations. It also provides opportunities for students to enhance their communication and interpersonal skills, which are essential to effective management. The structure of the course encourages learning at multiple levels: through in-class lectures, exercises, and discussions; in small teams carrying out projects; and in individual reading, study, and analysis. 

Microeconomics, ECON-SHU 3 (4 credits)

Offered Summer Session I. Instructor: Offer Shapir

Equivalent to ECON-UA 2 Intro to Microeconomics

This course is a rigorous, quantitative introduction to financial market structures and financial asset valuation. The main topics of the course are financial markets, arbitrage, portfolio selection, equilibrium asset pricing, fixed income securities and option pricing. You are expected to understand valuation formulas and be able to apply them to new problems. The appropriate tools necessary for solving these problems will be developed at each stage and practiced in the homework assignments. The models we will cover have immediate applications and implications for real-world financial decisions. To take this course, students must be comfortable with statistics, linear algebra, calculus, and microeconomics.
Prerequisites: Calculus (MATH-SHU 121 or 201)

Blockchain and its Business Applications, BUSF-SHU 272 (4 credits)

Offered Summer Session I. Instructor: Daniel Qi Chen

Fulfills Business Major Non-Finance/Non-Marketing Elective

Blockchain is a disruptive technological innovation behind the rapid emergencies of cryptocurrencies and distributed ledger systems. More and more companies have begun to integrate blockchain-based technology into their existing business models. The course is designed to provide business students with an understanding of key concepts and developments around the blockchain technology from multiple perspectives, including technology, law, and economics. Meanwhile, students will develop a strategic awareness of an array of business applications enabled by blockchain to disrupt every industry, e.g., commercial contracts, supply chains, and financial instruments. Besides readings and lectures, the course will heavily feature interactive activities through hands-on exercises, case studies and group work among students from different backgrounds.

Computer Science Courses (click here)

Discrete Math, CSCI-SHU 2314 (4 credits)

Offered Summer Session I. Instructor: Godfried Toussaint

Equivalent to CS-UH 1002 Discrete Mathematics; MATH-UA 120 Discrete Mathematics

This course is an introduction to discrete mathematics, emphasizing proof and abstraction, as well as applications to the computational sciences. Topics include sets, relations, and functions, graphs and trees, algorithms, proof techniques, and order of magnitude analysis, Boolean algebra and combinatorial circuits, formal logic and languages, automata, and combinatorics, probability, and statistics.
Co-requisite MATH-SHU 121 or MATH-SHU 201. Equivalent to MATH-UA 120.

Algorithms, CSCI-SHU 220 (4 credits)

Offered Summer Session I. Instructor: Godfried Toussaint

Equivalent to CSCI-UA 310 Basic Algorithms; CS-UH 1052, Algorithms

Introduction to the study of algorithms. Presents two main themes: designing appropriate data structures and analyzing the efficiency of the algorithms that use them. Algorithms studied include sorting, searching, graph algorithms, and maintaining dynamic data structures. Homework assignments, not necessarily involving programming.
Prerequisites: Discrete Math or Linear Algebra or Honors Linear Algebra

Databases, CSCI-SHU 213 (4 credits)

Offered Summer Session I. Instructor: Ratan Dey

The course covers modeling an application and logical database design, the relational model and relational data definition and data manipulation languages, design of relational databases and normalization theory, physical database design, query processing and optimization, transaction processing focusing on concurrency and recovery. The labs emphasize experiential learning of database systems and applications and an insight into various database management systems and query languages.
Prerequisite: Data Structures

Introduction to Computer Programming, CSCI-SHU 11 (4 credits)

Offered Summer Session I. Instructor: Lihua Xu

Equivalent to CSCI-UA 1 Introduction to Computer Programming

An introduction to the fundamentals of computer programming. Students design, write, and debug computer programs. No prior knowledge of programming is assumed. Students will learn programming using Python, a general purpose, cross-platform programming language with a clear, readable syntax. Most class periods will be part lecture, part lab as you explore ideas and put them into practice. This course is suitable for students not intending in majoring in computer science as well as for students intending to major in computer science but having no programming experience. Students with previous programming experience should instead take Introduction to Computer Science. 

French and Spanish Courses (click here)

French Grammar and Composition, FREN-SHU 30 (4 credits)

Offered Summer Session I. Instructor: Magali Kerbellec

Equivalent to FREN-UA 30 (NY), FREN-UA 9030 (Paris)

Systematizes and reinforces the language skills presented in earlier-level courses through an intensive review of grammar, written exercises, an introduction to composition, lexical enrichment, and literary analysis.
Prerequisite: Intermediate French 2 (FREN 12), Intensive Intermediate French (FREN 20), or assignment by placement exam, or permission of the director of Language Programs. 

Advanced Grammar and Composition, SPAN-SHU 100 (4 credits)

Offered Summer Session I. Instructor: David Pardo Cossío

Equivalent to SPAN-UA 100 (NY), SPAN-UA 9100 (Madrid & Buenos Aires)

Expands and consolidates students’ lexical and grammatical understanding of the language and introduces them to the fundamental principles of expository writing as they apply to Spanish. Utilizes exercises, readings, and intensive practice of various prose techniques and styles.
Prerequisite: Intermediate Spanish II (SPAN 4), Intensive Intermediate Spanish (SPAN 20), or assignment by placement test, or permission of the director of language programs. For non-native speakers only. 

Humanities and Global China Studies Courses (click here)

Chinese Science Fiction, GCHN-SHU 200-003 (4 credits)

Offered Summer Session I. Instructor: Ezra Claverie

Fulfills Chinese Arts; Humanities Topics Course; Global China Studies elective in "Chinese Media, Arts, and Literature"

This course will introduce students to approaches to studying Chinese science fiction (SF) in three different forms: short stories, novels, and movies. We will approach the question of what makes a given story “science fiction” as well as what makes a Chinese SF story “Chinese” besides the passport or first language of its author. We will look at such enduring topics as artificial intelligence, non-human intelligence, the extension of human life, and dystopian futures, and the ways that the demands of art, censorship, and commerce shape their representation in SF.Students will read a handful of British and American SF stories to help introduce the genre before moving into Chinese prose fiction (in English translation) and movies (in Cantonese or Mandarin, with English subtitles). Scholarly analyses of SF as a genre and histories of SF in Mainland China will equip students with analytical frameworks to apply to the fictional texts they encounter both in the syllabus and in their outside reading.

Forgotten Pasts, Inhuman Futures: Shanghai in Film, GCHN-SHU 200-004 (4 credits)

Offered Summer Session I. Instructor: Fareed Ismail Ben-Youssef

Fulfills Chinese Arts; Humanities Topics Course; Global China Studies elective in "Chinese Media, Arts, and Literature"

Shanghai is a city of contradiction. Its architectural division between the colonial architecture of the Bund and glistening skyscrapers of Pudong suggest a place whose identity seems shifting; whose nature appears to change depending on where we cast our eyes. Such tensions have long enamored filmmakers from both China and beyond who see in Shanghai echoes of a rich but fading past as well as glimpses of a new and possibly inhuman future. Ang Lee, adapting Eileen Chang’s novella Lust, Caution, found a decadent city whose Japanese occupation reflected a people struggling with invasive desire. By contrast, Michael Winterbottom, with the science-fiction film Code 46, saw a city of isolating towers that embody the inequities of global capitalism. This course frames the shifting meanings of the city by screening visions of Shanghai from across recent world cinema. The course serves as a primer for the city's wartime and Cultural Revolution history, its policies of urban renewal, and its inexorable ties to Chinese and international film history. Students learn the tools of close reading and formal analysis of both film and literature as well as secondary scholarship. Screenings and readings are accompanied by field trips to the Shanghai Film Museum, the Urban Planning Exhibition Hall and other related sites throughout Shanghai so that students can sense how the city has been molded over time and on the screen.

China in the World, GCHN-SHU 200-001 (4 credits)

Offered Summer Session I. Instructor: Michael Tsin

Fulfills SSPC; Humanities Topics; Global China Studies Elective in "Chinese History, Society, and Culture"

How should we evaluate China’s place in the world today? There are many myths and much misleading, and at times erroneous, information regarding China’s “engagement -- or lack thereof -- with the world, both historically and in the contemporary era. The purpose of this class is to try to put the question in its proper context and perspective, and to unpack some of the different layers involved in analyzing this question. Indeed, neither “China” nor the “World” is a static entity. This course will focus on the dynamics of how both “China” and the “World” have evolved and changed over time, and how each has interacted with the other along the way. The objective is to enable you to come away with a more informed, sophisticated and nuanced understanding of China’s “position” vis-à-vis the rest of the world, then and now.

Historical Tourism in Shanghai, GCHN-SHU 200-002 (2 credits)

Offered Summer Session I. Instructor: Deena Varner and Tapsi Mathur

Fulfills SSPC; Humanities Topics; Global China Studies Elective in "Chinese History, Society, and Culture"

This course will examine how Shanghainese history is constructed and disseminated on history tours as well as the methods used by tourism professionals to develop historical tours. We will explore a variety of historiographical methods and learn about how, by, and for whom this history is created, marketed, and consumed. Students will learn how to effectively critique historiographical narratives and conduct their own historical research using the methods they have learned. Students in this course will participate in a combination of walking tours developed by faculty with the assistance of tourism industry professionals, video tours created by faculty during their history tourism research, and one “behind the scenes” tour led by a tourism professional that will highlight how the tour was developed.

Love and War, Wisdom and Strife: Chinese Poetry in a Global Context, GCHN-SHU 183 (4 credits)

Offered Summer Session I. Instructor: David Perry

Fulfills Chinese Arts; Humanities Topics Course; Global China Studies elective in "Chinese Media, Arts, and Literature"

Love and war, wine and song, exile and return, sex and sensuality, adventure and meditation, yearning, struggle, and the peace that may come with deep wisdom: China’s vibrant poetic tradition embodies the human drama and thrives today as one of the world’s most profound explorations of what it is to live, love, struggle and seek insight -- in other words, exploration of the human condition itself. Furthermore, China’s history is one of verse, as its poetic traditions give readers insight into its civilizational story through the voices of its poets -- from soldiers and emperors to proud women and men, from everyday folk and exceptional historical figures to artists and scholars (as well as exiles and criminals) of the greatest fame (and infamy). In short, to come to a meaningful understanding of China -- and, especially the aesthetic pleasures of Chinese culture -- one must spend time among its poets. This is as true of China in our global age as it is of China’s deep history: English-language translations of China’s poetry are creations -- profoundly beautiful in their own right -- that seek to translate something essential about Chinese identity in particular while also striking deep, universal chords across cultures. For those with little knowledge of Chinese poetry, this class will serve as an introduction by way of English translations; for those with a strong knowledge of the original Chinese classics, the class will re-present poets from Li Bai and Du Fu to Bei Dao and Gu Cheng as they have appeared globally, in English translation, to readers the world over. We will often work through bilingual readings of great poems, providing both learners of Chinese and of English with opportunities to deepen their engagements with language in a general sense, but more particularly as perhaps the most fundamental means of aesthetic pleasure and cultural formation. In this class, students will deepen their engagements not only with poetry and challenges of Chinese-English literary translation, but also with compelling questions arising from philosophy, the intellectual and aesthetic challenges of translation, and from the very grounds of Chinese civilization itself.

Interactive Media Arts Courses (click here)

Communication and Curation, INTM-SHU 236-001 (4 credits)

Offered Summer Session I. Instructor: Yanyue Yuan

Fulfills IMA Elective Art & Design

This course aims to encourage students to reflect on and practice context-based communication through critical examination of curatorial practices in modern and contemporary times and working on a mini-curatorial team project to be exhibited in cultural spaces. We will explore how to improve storytelling that stimulates imagination and emotion, how to involve multi-sensory experiences, and how to initiate changes through disrupting existing orders. We will scrutinize the nuances in curatorial practices by introducing a variety of exhibition cases and try to explore the following questions: What are the features and limitations of communicating ideas through exhibitions? What are the norms and what might be the alternatives? How to communicate in a more creatively? How do we communicate in public spaces within a participatory culture framework? By practising communication through curation, students will develop capabilities to understand nuances in context-based communication, changes and opportunities brought by new media and participatory culture and experiment with diverse forms and styles of communication with their own curatorial project. Students will visit local museums and galleries as well as public art projects in Shanghai and conduct fieldwork to gain insight from potential audiences. This course will not only benefit students who want to work in cultural and public sectors but to all who hope to learn how to develop and present ideas in business settings. No prerequisite.

Unsustainable Fashion, INTM-SHU 236-002 (4 credits)

Offered Summer Session I. Instructor: Nimrah Syed

Fulfills IMA Elective Art & Design

This course encourages students to reflect on the current design practices in the fashion industry and explore the concept of sustainability through the lens of ethnography. This methodology curates an ethical understanding of human-engaged research approach to investigate contemporary design production and consumption practices at a systemic level. As critics of unsustainable practices and enthusiasts for sustainable development, the students will explore factors involved in the business of fashion and approaches to designing solutions through the use of sustainability frameworks for challenges identified as part of their inquiry process. A visit to YiWu, one of the world’s major consumer goods manufacturing capitals, would further help in developing an understanding of mass production and consumption practices. The lectures and case studies are aimed to increase critical understanding and awareness of the importance of sustainability not as an individual concept but throughout the lifecycle process. The guest speaker and in-class workshops will facilitate a hands-on approach towards the intended design outcome. This course is a conceptual and production class which will involve a design intervention group project with either a problem solving or awareness raising approach, weekly in-class topic presentations and reading responses.

Design Thinking, BUSF-SHU 211 (4 credits)

Offered Summer Session I. Instructor: Yanyue YuanLeon LuNimrah Syed

Fulfills IMA Elective Art & Design

Abu Dhabi Students: This course counts for Design Minor (Design Thinking) or Economics (Breadth Electives) or Economics (Entrepreneurship & Finance Track) or Interactive Media (Media & Design Thinking Electives) or Pre-Professional Courses (Business and Organizational Studies).

Design Thinking is a theoretical, methodological and practical framework that has the potential of bringing about socially responsible innovation. Critical thinking, teamwork, and empathy are the three pillars of this course. This course sharpens both critical thinking and hands-on ability. It requires students to step out of their comfort zone and to examine and challenge their own assumptions. There will be both group and individual coursework as well as reading responses, work in progress documentation and a final ‘Kickstarter-esque’ project presentation. This course will introduce the core concept and toolkits of design thinking as the foundation of innovative thinking and practices. Students will create, explore and develop concepts for digital products, services and experiences which will be analyzed through a variety of generative and evaluative approaches. The course will be delivered in a studio setup with in-class design workshops which will be partially student lead and partially instructor driven. Students will also have opportunities to visit makerspace and social enterprises in Shanghai and receive feedback on their project from designers and start-up leaders. No prerequisite.

Science and Experimental Discovery Courses (click here)

Nutrition, Fitness and Health, BIOL-SHU 5 (4 credits)

Offered Summer Session I. Instructor: Nataliya Galifianakis

Fulfills Experimental Discovery Core Curriculum Requirement.

Only in times of illness we usually realize that our most valuable possession is our health. To be in good health doesn’t mean simply to be disease free. This course will focus on the essential role and interaction of exercise and diet in achieving total fitness and wellness. The students will build a strong understanding of the foundations of exercise physiology and nutrition. Students will learn how to evaluate their own wellness level with respect to various wellness components, such as fitness level and nutritional status and will build their own personalized program to maintain their health.

Experiments in Food Science, CCEX-SHU 115 (4 credits)

Offered Summer Session I. Instructor: Lu Zhang

In this laboratory course students will become familiar with various techniques, equipment, data analysis skills, best practices in lab safety and ideas common to chemistry laboratories and to experimental research. The course will also give students an overview of the chemical and physical properties of the major and minor food components including water, carbohydrates, minerals, vitamins and so on. The course is intended to introduce students to the applied aspects of food chemistry, chemical properties of food components and relationships between the chemical composition of foods and functional, nutritional, and sensory properties. Students will also learn how to use scientific instruments and acquire different laboratory skills and techniques to help them draw conclusions from observed facts.

Social Science Courses (click here)

Psychology of Human Sexuality, PSYC-SHU 352 (4 credits)

Offered Summer Session I. Instructor: Pekka Santtila

Social Science Focus Course

The course provides an overview of empirical research into the psychology of human sexuality. The course surveys findings from basic research, theories regarding human sexuality, sexual functioning and its psychological correlates, and clinical research into sexual problems and their treatment. Topics covered include psychological aspects related to sexual and gender minorities, including affirmative counseling approaches for LGBTQ individuals; current scientific understanding of sexual variations as well as sexual harassment and coercion; sex as a commodity; and psychological aspects related to HIV/AIDS and its prevention. The study of human sexuality is inherently multidisciplinary as sexuality is a biopsychosocial phenomenon. Even though the course focuses on the psychological level of analysis, cultural, societal and legal aspects related to sexuality in a global context are relevant to many of the topics covered. As an example, we explore the topic of sexual racism/racial fetishism as well as legislation related to sexuality in different societies.
Pre-requisites: Introduction to Psychology

Methods and Practice: Journalism, JOUR-SHU 9202 (4 credits)

Offered Summer Session I. Instructor: David Maguire

Fulfills SSPC and Chinese Arts. Equivalent to JOUR-UA 9209 Methods and Practice

It provides an introduction to the work of the reporter, with particular focus on covering China, and offers students a chance to learn and practice basic journalism skills, including news writing, descriptive & feature writing, and writing for TV etc. Feedback on assignments is given in individual meetings. Visiting speakers and field trips also offer insights into the role of the journalist and the challenges faced. 

US-China Relations, SOCS-SHU 275 (4 credits)

Offered Summer Session I. Instructor: Ivan Willis Rasmussen

Fulfills SSPC; Social Science Focus; Global China Studies Elective; Humanities Topics

This course examines the complexities of the bilateral relationship between the People’s Republic of China (China) and the United States (US), focusing on the historical rapport, major debates, and current relations. Topics include Sino-US economic relations, media reporting, variation in political systems, global politics, climate/energy issues, military affairs, and contested territories.

Summer Session II Courses (July 8-August 16)

Business Courses (click here)

Business Analytics, BUSF-SHU 210 (4 credits)

Offered Summer Session II. Instructor: Jiawei Zhang

Business analytics refers to the scientific process of transforming data into insight for making better decisions. Business analytics has enabled many businesses, nonprofits, and governments to improve their routine activities, to identify long-run decision opportunities, and sometimes to rethink the whole of their activities. In this sense, business analytics has tactical and strategic value; it is an important factor of value creation. This course introduces the basic concepts, principles and techniques of business analytics. In the first part of the course, we focus on prescriptive analytics, i.e., the use of optimization to support decision-making in the presence of a large number of alternatives and business constraints. In the second part, we focus on predictive analytics, i.e., how to use data to develop insights and predictive capabilities using machine learning, data mining, Monte Carlo simulation, and forecasting techniques. The course is entirely hands-on. You will learn how to apply business analytics to a wide array of business decision problems with the help of spreadsheet models. Examples will be drawn from production planning, inventory management, project management, advertising planning, customer retention, pricing and revenue management, capital budgeting, investment portfolio optimization, risk management, among others. The emphasis will be on model formulation and interpretation of results, not on mathematical theory.

Computer Science Courses (click here)

Introduction to Computer Science, CSCI-SHU 101 (4 credits)

Offered Summer Session II. Instructor: Daniel Simon

Equivalent to CSCI-UA 101 Introduction to Computer Science; CS-UH 1001 Introduction to Computer Science

This course has three goals. First, the mastering of a modern object-oriented programming language, enough to allow students to tackle real-world problems of important significance. Second, gaining an appreciation of computational thinking, a process that provides the foundations for solving real-world problems. Finally, providing an overview of the very diverse and exciting field of computer science - a field which, arguably more than any other, impacts how we work, live, and play today. Prerequisite: Introduction to Computer Programming or Placement Exam.

Data Structures, CSCI-SHU 210 (4 credits)

Offered Summer Session II. Instructor: John Sterling

Equivalent to CS-UH 1050 Data Structures; CSCI-UA 102 Data Structures

Data structures are fundamental programming constructs which organize information in computer memory to solve challenging real-world problems. Data structures such as stacks, queues, linked lists, and binary trees, therefore constitute building blocks that can be reused, extended, and combined in order to make powerful programs. This course teaches how to implement them in a high-level language, how to analyze their effect on algorithm efficiency, and how to modify them to write computer programs that solve complex problems in a most efficient way. Programming assignments. Prerequisite: ICS, OR A in ICP, OR A- in ICP and enrolled in ICS concurrent to Data Structures. 

Information Visualization, CSCI-SHU 235 (4 credits)

Offered Summer Session I. Instructor: Enrico Bertini

Abu Dhabi Students: this course counts for Computer Science (Electives) or Design Minor (Design Electives); New York Students: this course counts for a CS 400-level Elective

Information visualization is the graphical representation of data to aid understanding, and is the key to analyzing massive amounts of data for fields such as science, engineering, medicine, and the humanities. This is an introductory undergraduate course on Information Visualization based on a modern and cohesive view of the area. Topics include techniques such as visual design principles, layout algorithms, and interactions as well as their applications of representing various types of data such as networks and documents. Overviews and examples from state-of-the-art research will be provided. The course is designed as a first course in information visualization for students both intending to specialize in visualization as well as students who are interested in understanding and applying visualization principles and existing techniques. 
Prerequisite: Data Structures.

Humanities and Global China Studies Courses (click here)

Contemporary Art in Shanghai: Exploring Art Spaces in the City, GCHN-SHU 200-005 (2 credits)

Offered Summer Session II. Instructor: Alice Wang

Fulfills Chinese Arts; Humanities Topics; Global China Studies Elective "Chinese Media, Arts, and Literature"

The landscape of contemporary art in Shanghai has shifted drastically in the last five years. Numerous new museums and galleries have opened up across the city, and with them, many artists, curators, and critics have also transplanted themselves in China’s commercial center. Due to the conservative political climate and massive urban redevelopment in Beijing, many arts professionals are continuing to relocate to Shanghai. Over the course of six weeks during Summer Term II, students will visit 5 different areas of art spaces in Shanghai, including museums, galleries, and independent art spaces, and have the opportunity to speak to local arts professionals who have witnessed Shanghai's rapidly shifting urban landscape. Contemporary Art in Shanghai is a fieldtrip class designed to provide students who are interested in contemporary art, curatorial studies, architecture, urban planning, and cultural/global studies with an insider's look into the latest happenings in one of the world's major commercial centers.

Chinese Science Fiction, GCHN-SHU 200-006 (4 credits)

Offered Summer Session II. Instructor: Ezra Claverie

Fulfills Chinese Arts; Humanities Topics; GCS Elective "Chinese Media, Arts, and Literature"

This course will introduce students to approaches to studying Chinese science fiction (SF) in three different forms: short stories, novels, and movies. We will approach the question of what makes a given story “science fiction” as well as what makes a Chinese SF story “Chinese” besides the passport or first language of its author. We will look at such enduring topics as artificial intelligence, non-human intelligence, the extension of human life, and dystopian futures, and the ways that the demands of art, censorship, and commerce shape their representation in SF.Students will read a handful of British and American SF stories to help introduce the genre before moving into Chinese prose fiction (in English translation) and movies (in Cantonese or Mandarin, with English subtitles). Scholarly analyses of SF as a genre and histories of SF in Mainland China will equip students with analytical frameworks to apply to the fictional texts they encounter both in the syllabus and in their outside reading.

Politics and Aesthetics of New Chinese Documentary: Globalization and Social Transformations, GCHN-SHU 134 (4 credits)

Offered Summer Session II. Instructor: Zhen Zhang

Fulfills Chinese Arts; Humanities Topics; GCS Elective "Chinese Media, Arts, and Literature"

The new Chinese documentary emerged in the 1990s. Prior to that, documentary film in China was exclusively produced and distributed within a state-controlled media system. Paralleling and bearing witness to more than two decades of rapid and large-scale economic and social transformations in China, the new documentary has also transformed itself into a broad DV trend involving an increasingly large number of filmmakers, activists, critics and publics. The course traces a historical trajectory of the movement and pursues discussions on the dynamic relationships between aesthetic experimentations, socio-political exigencies and ethical responsibilities in documentary-making. Screenings address issues of migration, social justice, the environment, and LGBTQ movement, etc. Several filmmakers will visit and discuss their works with the students. There will likely be a couple of field trips to alternative exhibition spaces of independent cinema.

Interactive Media Arts Courses (click here)

The Design and Fabrication of Everyday Things, INTM-SHU 236-003 (4 credits)

Offered Summer Session II. Instructor: Leon Lu

Fulfills IMA Elective for Art and Design

This course explores the fundamental processes involved in the design and fabrication of everyday objects. Students are introduced to creative techniques to develop insight into human behaviour and explore the idea of human needs. In parallel, they will learn how to make prototypes that begin with rapid paper prototyping techniques and later develops into tangible 3D models of objects using 3D modelling, 3D printing and laser cutting techniques. We will be using Rhino(3D) as our primary CAD software for 3D modelling, Adobe Illustrator to generate laser cutting files and Cura as our primary software to 3D print objects. This class will be partially lecture based and partially studio lead. This course is offered as part of Program on Creativity + Innovation (PCI) and the Interactive Media Arts (IMA) program. The overall goal of this course is to help students be an active part of the design process. Through use cases, design critique and in class workshops, students will build a fundamental understanding of design and through in-class tutorials, live demonstrations and access to digital fabrication tools, students will be able to realise their ideas into tangible, tactile objects based on insight and research.

Creative Learning Design, INTM-SHU 236A (4 credits)

Offered Summer Session II. Instructor: Alex Ruthmann

Fulfills IMA "Art & Design"

In this course, students will work in teams to design digital learning resources and experience designs at the intersection of music, coding, arts, and technology. The course will begin with an introduction to emerging trends in learner engagement and design-based research, especially related to web- and mobile-based musical experiences and principles of making music with new media. Innovations in and applications of musical creativity, interactive technologies, user-centered design & engagement, scaffolded learning, creative learning, pedagogies of play and making, and educational entrepreneurship in Chinese contexts will also be explored. The market for creative educational experiences in afterschool settings for youth in China is exploding. For-profit educational service companies are competing and searching for differentiated, learning experiences in music, coding, and creative project based learning that will attract high-paying parents looking for the best supplemental education for their children. This practical, hands-on course will explore questions such as: How can we design engaging, creative learning experiences that are relevant to the cultural goals and needs of today’s youth in China, while laying the foundation for creative learning for the workforce of tomorrow? What are engaging, effective creative learning resources, and how are they best implemented in Chinese learning settings? How can we take advantage of young people’s near ubiquitous love of music and technology to facilitate creative learning? Students will work together in teams and paired with a partner audience of learners and teachers in Shanghai drawn from local and regional international schools (e.g. Alibaba’s Cloud Valley), local afterschool programs (e.g., Music Lab), and cultural partners (e.g., Shanghai Symphony). Together they will assess the needs and opportunities of partner students and teachers, and engage in a two-stage iterative and reflective co-design process prototyping custom learning resources and experience designs with their partner end users. At the end of the course, students will present and demo their learning resources as part of a public showcase to an external audience of partners, educators, technologists, musicians, entrepreneurs, and experience designers in Shanghai.

Mathematics Courses (click here)

Calculus, MATH-SHU 121 (4 credits)

Offered Summer Session II. Instructor: Roberto Fernandez

Equivalent to MATH-UH 1021 Multivariable Calculus with Applications to Science and Engineering; MATH-UA 121 Calculus I (note this course also covers material from the first half of MATH-UA 122 Calculus II)

This course presents the foundations of calculus for functions of a single variable. Topics addressed include limits, continuity, rules of differentiation, approximation,antiderivatives, indefinite and definite integrals, the fundamental theorem of calculus, integration techniques, and improper integrals.
Prerequisite: Placement via Placement Examination or a grade of C or better in Precalculus

Science and Experimental Discovery courses (click here)

Microbes, CCEX-SHU 119 (4 credits)

Offered Summer Session II. Instructor: Igantius Tan

Fulfills Core Curriculum Experimental Discovery Science requirement

Microbes are tiny organisms that are found on every imaginable surface and habitat. Some microbes are essential to a healthy life; others cause infectious diseases in plants and animals, and contribute to chronic diseases and conditions, such as cancer and environmentally-related diseases. To understand our delicate and complex relationship with different forms of microbes, scientists have looked at DNA for clues about the origin of our relationship, developing tools to help with diagnostic tests, and the development of treatments and prevention methods. This information raises various social, ethical, and political questions about how we use our knowledge of microbes. In this course students will learn the fundamentals of the biological molecules that comprise the cell, and through a hands-on research project, students will identify the local microbes through the information found in their DNA. Identifying what microbes are present provides the class with a unique opportunity to understand the possible roles these microbes have in society and discuss how microbes positively and negatively affect the various policy options that are relevant to the social dilemmas that science has brought forth.

 

Social Science Courses (click here)

Anthropology of a New World Order: China and Africa, SOCS-SHU 200 (4 credits)

Offered Summer Session II. Instructor: Cheryl Mei-Ting Schmitz

This course counts for a Global China Studies major China and the World course; fulfills SSPC and Social Science major 300-Level Focus Course in Anthropology Track

Over the past decade, China’s unprecedented engagement with African countries has inspired controversy and criticism in both academic and popular circles. China has become Africa’s largest trading partner and now allocates the majority of its overseas aid to the continent. Over a million Chinese citizens have moved to African countries to work in various industries, and Chinese state-owned enterprises have been contracted to build vast infrastructure projects. At the same time, thousands of African students and entrepreneurs have come to China to pursue their dreams. Despite the attention these developments have garnered, much remains to be understood about their social and cultural aspects, or how they are played out in everyday life. This course aims to move beyond debates that ask whether China-Africa relations are either South-South cooperation or neocolonialism. Instead, through an investigation of historical, journalistic, and ethnographic materials, it seeks to uncover how Africa-China connections might contain elements of both. In working through this paradox, we will explore such questions as: How are histories of Third World solidarity transformed through contemporary Afro-Asian interactions? What kinds of political, economic, and racial-national ideas are deployed in Chinese relations with African countries and people? And how can we understand China-Africa relations through not only political economic formations but also social and cultural effects? Students will be asked to carefully analyze media reports and attend to local specificities, to question dominant narratives and develop their own critical perspectives.