Summer Session Courses

Summer

2020 Summer Sessions

NYU Shanghai is offering all levels of intensive Chinese and many other content courses taught in English in Shanghai for summer 2020. Please check below to see which courses are currently planned to be taught remotely. (At the bottom of each course description there is information about the course format.) All Chinese language courses in Session 1 will be offered as distance learning courses. It is possible that classes listed as being taught in-person will be forced by the coronavirus-related events to change to distance learning courses, so please continue checking this website and the courses below to find out the latest status. 

Application Information
Tuition and Costs

The course list below was last updated July 6, 2020. 

Language Courses

Beginning and Elementary Chinese Courses (click here) - offered Session 1 and 2

Elementary Chinese I, CHIN-SHU 101 (4 credits) (Offered Session 1 only)

Instructor: TBD
Equivalent to CHINL-AD 101 Elementary Chinese 1; EAST-UA 201 Elementary Chinese I

This course is the first part of a one-year elementary-level Chinese course designed for students who have no or almost no knowledge of Mandarin Chinese. It is designed to develop language skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing as it relates to everyday life situations. The objectives of the course are: (1) to master the Chinese phonetic system (pinyin and tones) with satisfactory pronunciation; (2) to understand the construction of commonly used Chinese Characters (both simplified and traditional) and learn to write them correctly; (3) to understand and use correct basic Chinese grammar and sentence structures; (4) to build up essential vocabulary; (5) to read and write level-appropriate passages (100-150 characters long); and (6) to become acquainted with aspects of Chinese culture and society related to the course materials.

Format: Online
Course schedule: Mon, Tue, Thu, Fri. Synchronous class times TBA.
 

Elementary Chinese II, CHIN-SHU 102 (4 credits)

Instructor: Xiaoya Gu (Session 1); Jing Chai (Session 2)

Equivalent to CHINL-AD 102 Elementary Chinese 2; EAST-UA 202 Elementary Chinese II

This course is the second part of a one-year elementary-level Chinese course designed for students who have completed NYU-SH’s Elementary Chinese I or equivalent. It is designed to reinforce and further develop language skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing as it relates to everyday life situations. The objectives of the course are: (1) to continue mastering the Chinese phonetic system (pinyin and tones); (2) to become further familiarized with the construction of commonly used Chinese Characters (both simplified and traditional); (3) to understand and use correctly basic Chinese grammar and sentence structures; (4) to continue building up essential vocabulary; (5) to read and write level appropriate passages (150-200 characters long); and (6) to become acquainted with aspects of Chinese culture and society related to the course materials.

Format: Online 
Course schedule: Mon, Tue, Thu, Fri. Synchronous class times TBA.

Elementary Chinese I For Advanced Beginners, CHIN-SHU 111 (4 credits) (Offered Session 1 only)

Instructor: Ying Song (Session 1); TBA (Session 2)

Equivalent to EAST-UA 231 Elementary Chinese I for Advanced Beginners

This course is the first part of a one-year elementary-level Chinese course designed for students who can understand and speak conversational Chinese related to daily-life situations, but have not learned to read/write Chinese characters. This includes students who were raised in a non-Chinese speaking country but in a home where the Mandarin Chinese dialect was spoken, and/or students who have acquired a certain level of Mandarin Chinese language proficiency (primarily speaking and listening) by living or working in a Chinese speaking country/region for an extended time. Though speaking and listening will be an integral part of the course, the major focus will be on developing students’ competence in reading and writing. The objectives of the course are: 1) to master the Chinese phonetic system (pinyin and tones) with satisfactory pronunciation; 2) to understand the construction of commonly used Chinese Characters (both simplified and traditional) and write them correctly; 3) to build up essential vocabulary needed to read and write about topics covered in the textbook; 4) to understand and use correctly basic Chinese grammar and sentence structures; 5) to comprehend level appropriate passages and to be able to perform simple sentence analysis; 6) to write level appropriate essays (250-300 characters long) with grammatical, accuracy as well as cohesion and coherence; 7) to become acquainted with and be able to discuss in speech and writing aspects of Chinese culture and society related to the course materials. Prerequisite: None.

Format: Online 
Course schedule: Mon, Tue, Thu, Fri. Synchronous class times TBA.

Intermediate Chinese Courses (click here) - offered Session 1 and 2

Intermediate Chinese I, CHIN-SHU 201 (4 credits)

Instructor: Xiaoli Jin (Session 1); Meng Zhou (Session 2)

Equivalent to CHINL-AD 201 Intermediate Chinese 1; EAST-UA 203 Intermediate Chinese I

This course is the first part of a one-year intermediate-level Chinese course designed for students who have completed NYU-SH’s Elementary Chinese II or equivalent. It is designed to consolidate and develop overall aural-oral proficiency. Objectives are: (1) to be able to obtain information from more extended conversation; (2) to express and expound on, in relative length, feelings and opinions on common topics; (3) to develop vocabulary needed to discuss common topics and begin learning to decipher meaning of compound words; (4) to develop reading comprehension of more extended narrative and expository passages; (5) to write, in relative length (200-250 characters long), personal narratives, informational narratives, comparison and discussion of viewpoints with level-appropriate vocabulary and grammatical accuracy, as well as basic syntactical cohesion; (6) to continue being acquainted with aspects of Chinese culture and society related to the course materials.

Format: Online 
Course schedule: Mon, Tue, Thu, Fri. Synchronous class times TBA.

Intermediate Chinese II, CHIN-SHU 202 (4 credits)

Instructor: Chenchen Zhao (Session 1); Hui-Ching Lu (Session 2)

Equivalent to CHINL-AD 202 Intermediate Chinese 2; EAST-UA 204 Intermediate Chinese II

This course is the second part of a one-year intermediate-level Chinese course designed for students who have completed NYU-SH’s Intermediate Chinese I or equivalent. It is designed to continue consolidating and developing overall aural-oral proficiency, gradually focusing more on semi-formal or formal linguistic expressions. Objectives are: (1) to further develop competence in obtaining information from more extended conversation; (2) to express and expound on, in more extended length, feelings and opinions on socio-cultural topics; (3) to develop more specialized vocabulary needed to discuss sociocultural topics; (4) to improve students’ ability to decipher meaning of compound words; (5) to further develop reading comprehension of extended narrative, expository and simple argumentative passages; (6) to learn to solve simple syntactical problems independently; (7) to write, in relative length (250-300) characters long) informational narratives, expository and simple argumentative passages with level-appropriate vocabulary and grammatical accuracy, as well as basic syntactical cohesion; and (7) to continue being acquainted with aspects of Chinese culture and society related to the course materials.

Format: Online 
Course schedule: Mon, Tue, Thu, Fri. Synchronous class times TBA.

Intermediate Chinese I For Advanced Beginners, CHIN-SHU 211 (4 credits)

Instructor:  Jiani Lian (Session 1)

Equivalent to EAST-UA 232 Intermediate Chinese I for Advanced Beginners

This course is designed for students who have at least one year of Chinese language learning at NYU and who, before registering for this course, already command above-elementary aural-oral proficiency in Mandarin Chinese. The objectives are: to be able to obtain information from extended written passages; to both express and expound on, in relative length, feelings and opinions on common social and cultural topics; to expand vocabulary and learn to decipher the meaning of compound words; to develop reading comprehension of extended expository and simple argumentative passages; to solve non-complex textual problems with the aid of dictionaries; to write in relative length personal narratives, informational narratives, comparison and discussion of viewpoints with level appropriate vocabulary and grammatical accuracy, as well as syntactical cohesion; to continue to become acquainted with aspects of Chinese culture and society related to the course materials. Prerequisite CHIN-111

Format: Online 
Course schedule: Mon, Tue, Thu, Fri. Synchronous class times TBA.

Advanced Chinese Courses (click here) - offered Session 1 and 2

Advanced Chinese I for Non-Heritage Students​, CHIN-SHU 301 (4 credits)

Instructor:  Qing Li (Session 1); Xiaobo Shui (Session 2)​

Equivalent to CHINL-AD 301 Advanced Chinese 1; EAST-UA 205 Advanced Chinese 1

This course is the first part of a one-year Advanced Chinese course designed for students who have successfully completed Intermediate Chinese II at NYU-SH, or who have at least the equivalent knowledge of Chinese upon registration. It is designed to reinforce and further improve students’ overall communicative competence by incorporating semi-formal or formal usages. The objectives of the course are: (1) to learn to apply formal linguistic expressions in speaking and writing; (2) to acquire specialized vocabulary and patterns necessary for conducting formal discussions of socio-cultural topics; (3) to develop reading comprehension of texts with more advanced syntax; (4) to learn to make context-based guesses about the meaning of a new word and further enhance students’ ability to analyze as well as produce sentences with more complex syntactical features; (5) to learn to write expository and argumentative passages in more extended length; and (6) to learn to employ basic rhetoric devices in writing.

Format: Online
Course schedule: Mon, Wed, Fri. Synchronous class times TBA.

Advanced Chinese II for Non-Heritage Students​, CHIN-SHU 302 (4 credits)

Instructor: Xiaoyue Huang (Session 1); Jingjong Bi (Session 2)

Equivalent to CHINL-AD 302 Advanced Chinese 2; EAST-UA 206 Advanced Chinese 2

This course is the second part of a one-year Advanced Chinese course designed for students who have successfully completed Advanced Chinese I at NYU-SH, or who have the equivalent knowledge of Chinese upon registration. It is designed to reinforce and further improve students’ overall communicative competence by incorporating semi-formal or formal usages. The objectives of the course are: (1) to enhance further students’ oral and written communicative competence using formal linguistic expressions; (2) to expand further specialized vocabulary and patterns necessary for conducting formal discussions of socio-cultural topics relevant to today’s China; (3) to improve further students’ reading comprehension of texts with more advanced syntax; (4) to develop further their competence in making context-based guess about the meaning of a new word, and further enhance ability to analyze as well as produce sentences with more complex syntactical features; (5) to improve further their ability to write expository and argumentative passages in more extended length; (6) to improve their ability to effectively employ basic rhetoric devices in writing.

Format: Online 
Course schedule: Mon, Wed, Fri. Synchronous class times TBA.

Japanese Courses (click here) - offered only in Session 1

Elementary Japanese I, JAPN-SHU 5, Session I (4 credits)

Instructor: Yoshihiro Kagawa

Introductory course in modern spoken and written Japanese, designed to develop fundamental skills in areas of speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Gives contextualized instructions to develop both communicative and cultural competency. Systematically introduces the Japanese writing system (Hiragana, Katakana, and Kanji). Open to students with no previous training in Japanese and to others on assignment by placement test. 

Format: In-Person ​
Course schedule: 8:30 AM -11:30 AM Mon, Tue, Thu, Fri

Cantonese Courses (click here) - offered only in Session 2

Topics in Cantonese: Introductory Cantonese Language and Culture, CHIN-SHU 150, Session II  (4 credits)

Instructor: Pui Shan Hui

Cantonese is one of the major dialect.in southern China and Chinese communities around the globe. It also has a rich history and culture. This course is designed for students who are having some basic knowledge about Cantonese and/or Mandarin Chinese speakers. Jyutping system is the main system in this course. The course aims to increase students' awareness and interest in the Cantonese dialect by teaching them the basic characteristics of the Cantonese grammar, differences between Cantonese & Mandarin, sentence structure, commonly used terms for daily situational conversations and work needs. This course is designed for learners who want to learn Cantonese in a lively way. Cantonese will also be introduced through canto pops, dramas, movies and food culture.​
Prerequisite: CHIN-SHU 201 Intermediate Chinese I

Format: Online 
Course schedule: 9:00 AM - 10:30 AM Mon, Tue, Wed, Thu

Summer Session I Courses (May 25-July 3)

Business, Economics, and Mathematics Courses (click here)

Foundations of Finance, BUSF-SHU 202 (4 credits)

Instructor: Offer Moshe Shapir

Equivalent to ECON-UH 2510 Foundations of Financial Markets; FINC-UB 2 Foundations of Finance
Fulfills Business Core Course


This course is a rigorous, quantitative introduction to financial market structures and financial asset valuation. The main topics of the course are financial markets, arbitrage, portfolio selection, equilibrium asset pricing, fixed income securities and option pricing. You are expected to understand valuation formulas and be able to apply them to new problems. The appropriate tools necessary for solving these problems will be developed at each stage and practiced in the homework assignments. The models we will cover have immediate applications and implications for real-world financial decisions. To take this course, students must be comfortable with statistics, linear algebra, calculus, and microeconomics.​

Prerequisites: BUSF-SHU 101 Statistics for Business and Economics and ECON-SHU 150 Microeconomics

Format: Online​
Course Schedule: 1:30 PM - 4:30 PM (Lecture), Mon, Wed. 

Principles of Financial Accounting, BUSF-SHU 250 (4 credits)

Instructors: Jing Dai (Section 1), Sunqian Ren (Section 2)

Equivalent to ECON-UH 1501 Introduction to Accounting; ACCT-UB 1 Principles of Accounting
Fulfills Business Core Course

Develops students’ abilities to understand business transactions and financial statements and to determine the most appropriate financial measures for these events. Investigates the underlying rationale for accounting practices and assesses their effectiveness in providing useful information for decision making. Emphasis is placed on accounting practices that purport to portray corporate financial position, operating results, cash flows, manager performance, and financial strength. 

Format: In-person
Course schedule: 

Professor Jing Dai's Section 

Lecture: 12:30 PM - 3:30 PM, Tue & Thu, In-Person On Campus
Recitation: 03:35 PM - 04:35 PM, Tue, In-Person On Campus Recitation with Teaching Assistant Ziye Wang

Professor Sunqian Ren's Section 

Lecture: 12:30 PM - 3:30 PM, Mon & Wed, Pre-recorded Lecture
Recitation: 03:35 PM - 04:35 PM, Mon, In-Person On Campus Recitation with Teaching Assistant Ziye Wang

Microeconomics, ECON-SHU 3 (4 credits)

Instructor: Offer Moshe Shapir

Equivalent to ECON-UA 2 Intro to Microeconomics (Note for NYU Shanghai students: ECON-UA 2 does not fulfill NYU Shanghai Business major requirements.)
Fulfills Business Core Course


This course is a rigorous, quantitative introduction to financial market structures and financial asset valuation. The main topics of the course are financial markets, arbitrage, portfolio selection, equilibrium asset pricing, fixed income securities and option pricing. You are expected to understand valuation formulas and be able to apply them to new problems. The appropriate tools necessary for solving these problems will be developed at each stage and practiced in the homework assignments. The models we will cover have immediate applications and implications for real-world financial decisions. To take this course, students must be comfortable with statistics, linear algebra, calculus, and microeconomics.​

Prerequisites: Calculus (MATH-SHU 121 or 201)

Format: Online​
Course Schedule: 1:30 PM - 4:30 PM (Lecture), Tue, Thu. 

Management and Organizations, MGMT-SHU 301 (4 credits)

Instructor: David Hunsaker

Equivalent to BUSOR-AD 115 Management & Organizations; MGMT-UB 1 (9001) Management & Organizations
Fulfills Business Elective


This course addresses contemporary management challenges stemming from changing organizational structures, complex environmental conditions, new technological developments, and increasingly diverse workforces. It highlights critical management issues involved in planning, organizing, controlling, and leading an organization. Ultimately, it aims to strengthen students’ managerial potential by providing general frameworks for analyzing, diagnosing, and responding to both fundamental and complex organizational situations. It also provides opportunities for students to enhance their communication and interpersonal skills, which are essential to effective management. The structure of the course encourages learning at multiple levels: through in-class lectures, exercises, and discussions; in small teams carrying out projects; and in individual reading, study, and analysis. 

Format: Online​

This course is very fun and interactive, with in-class activities on topics like leadership, performance management, team work, stereotyping, etc. To accommodate these exercises, I will have one class per week (Monday) that is more lecture-based. Monday will be live but with an option to watch later. On Wednesday, we will focus on in-class exercises. Students will be required to join live on Wednesdays so that they can participate in the more interactive parts of the course. 


Course schedule: 7:00 PM - 10:00 PM  Mon, Wed. Monday will be a live lecture, but recorded if you cannot attend live. Wednesday synchronous attendance is required and will focus on in-class interactive exercises. 

Calculus 1, MATH-SHU 121 (4 credits)

Instructor: Joseba Dalmau

Equivalent to MATH-UA 121 Calculus 1. Note: This course will not be recognized as fulfilling the Calculus prerequisites of higher-level MATH-SHU courses. Students pursuing the following majors will therefore not be able to use this MATH-SHU 121 to fulfill major requirements: Economics, Natural Sciences, Mathematics, Data Science, Computer Science, Engineering.

This course presents the foundations of calculus for functions of a single variable. Topics addressed include limits, continuity, rules of differentiation, antiderivatives, definite integrals and the fundamental theorem of calculus.

Format: In-person and online

The schedule of the course has been modified to accommodate students in time zones other than Shanghai, so that each student should be able to attend at least half the lectures and recitations. All lectures and recitations will take place on the NYU Shanghai campus so that students can attend in-person, but they will also be recorded via zoom, and made readily available for all students to watch remotely as well. On top of that, the instructor will be available the mornings/afternoons following the lectures/recitations to discuss with the students that were not able to attend, clarify their doubts, questions etc.


Course schedule: 4:30 PM - 7:30 PM Mon (Lecture), 4:30 PM - 5:50 PM, Tue (Recitation), 8:30 AM -11:30 AM, Wed (Lecture), 8:30 AM - 9:50 AM, Thu (Recitation)

Creative Writing Courses (click here)

Collaborative Writing & The Power Dynamics of The Writer's Room, CRWR-SU 176 (4 credits)

Instructor: Aurorae Khoo

Fulfills Creative Writing Minor Elective

A collaborative writing course where students work in groups to create polished television (or film) scripts and learn the fundamentals of dramatic writing. Creativity and the group dynamic is explored. This course is appropriate for both beginning and advanced writers. This course covers the material of a traditional narrative writing class and also puts into action theories of Organizational Behavioral Management such as: communication, motivation, conflict resolution, emotional intelligence, group dynamic, stress, and the influences of gender, race, age, and class on power within a group. Interpersonal skills and the ability to navigate the group dynamic are, perhaps, 75% of what it takes to be a working writer. But they also can be applied to ANY FIELD and any work environment​.

Format: Online

The structure and content of the class remains the same as an on-campus course. The course will have synchronous Zoom workshops and the instructor is experienced in teaching online writing workshops. Students will present work in class in the writers' workshop format. The instructor will lead the discussion with your peers. Outside of class, students will work with a partner to collaborate on a larger writing project. This will be done via Zoom, Skype, or Final Draft collaboration. There are free student trials of screenwriting software available for students.


Course schedule: 09:00 AM -- 12:00 PM Tue, Thu. 

Computer Science Courses (click here)

Introduction to Computer Programming, CSCI-SHU 11 (4 credits)

Instructor: Olivier Marin

Equivalent to CSCI-UA 1 Introduction to Computer Programming. Note: Students who have already taken Introduction to Computer Science may not take this course.
Fulfills Computer Science Major Required Course

An introduction to the fundamentals of computer programming. Students design, write, and debug computer programs. No prior knowledge of programming is assumed. Students will learn programming using Python, a general purpose, cross-platform programming language with a clear, readable syntax. Most class periods will be part lecture, part lab as you explore ideas and put them into practice. This course is suitable for students not intending in majoring in computer science as well as for students intending to major in computer science but having no programming experience. Students with previous programming experience should instead take Introduction to Computer Science. 
Prerequisite: C in Pre-Calculus or placement out of Pre-Calculus. 

Format: In-person 
Course schedule: 08:30 AM -- 11:30 AM (Lecture), 11:35 AM -- 12:35 PM (Recitation) Mon, Wed. 

Introduction to Computer Science, CSCI-SHU 101 (4 credits)

Instructor: Li Guo

Equivalent to CSCI-UA 101 Introduction to Computer Science; CS-UH 1001 Introduction to Computer Science. Note: This course is taught in Python. Students who intend to go on to take CSCI-UA102 Data Structures at NYU New York CAS (which is taught in Java) will be required to take a Java placement exam prior to enrolling in CSCI-UA102 Data Structures at CAS.
Fulfills Computer Science Major Required Course

This course has three goals. First, the mastering of a modern object-oriented programming language, enough to allow students to tackle real-world problems of important significance. Second, gaining an appreciation of computational thinking, a process that provides the foundations for solving real-world problems. Finally, providing an overview of the very diverse and exciting field of computer science - a field which, arguably more than any other, impacts how we work, live, and play today.
Prerequisite: Introduction to Computer Programming or Placement Exam.

Format: In-person  ​
Course schedule: 08:15 -- 11:15 AM (Lec), 11:20 AM -- 12:20 PM (Lab) Tue, Thur

Data Structures, CSCI-SHU 210 (4 credits)

Instructor: Ratan Dey

Equivalent to CS-UH 1050 Data Structures; CSCI-UA 102 Data Structures
Fulfills Required CS/CE/DS Course

Data structures are fundamental programming constructs which organize information in computer memory to solve challenging real-world problems. Data structures such as stacks, queues, linked lists, and binary trees, therefore constitute building blocks that can be reused, extended, and combined in order to make powerful programs. This course teaches how to implement them in a high-level language, how to analyze their effect on algorithm efficiency, and how to modify them to write computer programs that solve complex problems in a most efficient way. Programming assignments. Prerequisite: ICS, OR A in ICP, OR A- in ICP and enrolled in ICS concurrent to Data Structures. This course is taught in Python and assumes full knowledge of Python.

Format: Online
Course schedule: 08:30 AM -- 11:30 AM (Lecture), 11:35 AM-- 12:35 PM (Recitation) Mon, Wed. 

Databases, CSCI-SHU 213 (4 credits)

Instructor: Ratan Dey

Fulfills Computer Science Elective

The course covers modeling an application and logical database design, the relational model and relational data definition and data manipulation languages, design of relational databases and normalization theory, physical database design, query processing and optimization, transaction processing focusing on concurrency and recovery. The labs emphasize experiential learning of database systems and applications and an insight into various database management systems and query languages.
Prerequisite: Data Structures

Format: Online​
Course schedule: 7:00 PM-10:00 PM, Mon, Wed. 

Discrete Math, CSCI-SHU 2314 (4 credits)

Instructor: Laurent Mertz

Equivalent to CS-UH 1002 Discrete Mathematics; MATH-UA 120 Discrete Mathematics
Fulfills Computer Science Major Required Course

This course is an introduction to discrete mathematics, emphasizing proof and abstraction, as well as applications to the computational sciences. Topics include sets, relations, and functions, graphs and trees, algorithms, proof techniques, and order of magnitude analysis, Boolean algebra and combinatorial circuits, formal logic and languages, automata, and combinatorics, probability, and statistics.
Co-requisite MATH-SHU 121 or MATH-SHU 201. Equivalent to MATH-UA 120.

Format: Online
Course schedule: 01:00 PM -- 04:00 PM Mon, Wed.

Humanities and Global China Studies Courses (click here)

Chinese Science Fictions, GCHN-SHU 208 (4 credits)

Instructor: Ezra Claverie

Fulfills Core HPC; Old Humanities Requirements: Topics course; New Humanities Requirements: Advanced course; Introductory course; GCS Elective "Chinese Media, Arts, and Literature

This course will introduce students to approaches to studying Chinese science fiction (SF) in three different forms: short stories, novels, and movies. We will approach the question of what makes a given story “science fiction” as well as what makes a Chinese SF story “Chinese” besides the passport or first language of its author. We will look at such enduring topics as artificial intelligence, non-human intelligence, the extension of human life, and dystopian futures, and the ways that the demands of art, censorship, and commerce shape their representation in SF. Students will read a handful of British and American SF stories to help introduce the genre before moving into Chinese prose fiction (in English translation) and movies (in Cantonese or Mandarin, with English subtitles). Scholarly analyses of SF as a genre and histories of SF in Mainland China will equip students with analytical frameworks to apply to the fictional texts they encounter both in the syllabus and in their outside reading.

Format: In-person
Course schedule:
Section 1: 01:00 PM -- 04:00 PM Mon,Wed
Section 2: 08:30 -- 11:30 AM Tue/Thu

Theme Parks in China: An Ambitious and Ambiguous Journey, GCHN-SHU 209 (4 credits)

Instructor: Asli Berktay & Jing Wang

This course is an elective in the Humanities majors as follows: Old Humanities Major Requirements: topics course, New Humanities Major Requirements: Advanced course. It also counts as a GCS "Chinese History, Society and Culture" elective.

At the 1964 World’s Fair, Walt Disney stated: “This is the beginning of an entirely new form of art and entertainment which will eventually take its place beside the theater, opera and motion pictures.” Since the 1960s, it is undeniable that theme parks have become a distinctive form entangled with global circulation and national imagination.

Ambitious and ambiguous, the theme park phenomenon in China is an integral part of a fast-changing neoliberal economy fueled by national imagination. This course invites students to embark a journey into theme parks in contemporary China. The journey starts with an intellectual mapping of the idea of theme parks around the world. We will look at the theories surrounding theme parks on a global scale, as well as the theories surrounding national imagination. Then, we will turn our attention to the diverse theme parks in China. More specifically, students will explore different historical, cultural, ethnic, national, and gender narratives which bridge the knowledge gap between the global and the national through case studies. Hence, an important part of this course will be short field trips to theme parks in Shanghai and the neighboring city Hangzhou.

Format: In-person 
Course schedule: 01:00 PM -- 04:00 PM Mon,Wed​

Chinese American Women, Gender and Sexuality, HIST-SHU 314 (4 credits)

Instructor: Fang He

Fulfills Old Humanities Requirements for the Major: Topics Course; New Humanities Requirements for the Major: Advanced Course; Global China Studies elective in the "Chinese History, Society and Culture" Category.

This course explores Chinese American women, gender and sexuality from the mid-19th century to the present. It engages with themes and topics such as migration, exclusion, labor, marriage, family, intimacy, representations of the body and feminist struggles. It seeks to destabilize the sexualized and racialized images of Chinese women and men in U.S. popular discourse by centering their marginalized voices and by interrogating colonialism, imperialism and orientalism. This course will introduce students the diversity of historical experiences of Chinese American women and men from a trans-Pacific perspective. It will guide students to inquire critically into the ways in which gender and sexuality has profoundly shaped experiences of migration, law-making processes, family structures, community building and institutional transformations regarding Chinese Americans.

Format: In-person 
Course schedule: 05:00 PM -- 08:00 PM Mon, Wed​

Science and Experimental Discovery Courses (click here)

Experiments in Food Science, CCEX-SHU 115 (4 credits)

Instructor: Lu Zhang

For NYU Shanghai students, fulfills: Core Curriculum Experimental Discovery

In this laboratory course students will become familiar with various techniques, equipment, data analysis skills, best practices in lab safety, and ideas common to chemistry laboratories and to experimental research. The course will also give students an overview of the chemical and physical properties of the major and minor food components including water, carbohydrates, minerals, vitamins and so on. The course is intended to introduce students to the applied aspects of food chemistry, chemical properties of food components and relationships between the chemical composition of foods and functional, nutritional, and sensory properties. Students will also learn how to use scientific instruments and acquire different laboratory skills and techniques to help them draw conclusions from observed facts.

Format: In-person ​
Course schedule: 01:00 PM -- 04:00 PM Tue, Thu

Nutrition, Fitness and Health, BIOL-SHU 5 (4 credits)

Instructor: Nataliya Galifianakis

For NYU Shanghai students, fulfills: Core Curriculum Experimental Discovery

Only in times of illness we usually realize that our most valuable possession is our health. To be in good health doesn’t mean simply to be disease free. This course will focus on the essential role and interaction of exercise and diet in achieving total fitness and wellness. The students will build a strong understanding of the foundations of exercise physiology and nutrition. Students will learn how to evaluate their own wellness level with respect to various wellness components, such as fitness level and nutritional status and will build their own personalized program to maintain their health.

Format: Online ​
Course schedule: 05:00 PM -- 8:00 PM Tue, Thu. 

Interactive Media Arts Courses (click here)

Design and Fabrication of Everyday Things, INTM-SHU 218 (4 credits)

Instructor: Leon Lu

Fulfills IMA Elective

This course explores the fundamental processes involved in the design and fabrication of everyday objects. Students are introduced to creative techniques to develop insight into human behavior and explore the idea of human needs. In parallel, they will learn how to make prototypes that begin with rapid paper prototyping techniques and later develops into tangible 3D models of objects using 3D modelling, 3D printing and laser cutting techniques. We will be using Rhino(3D) as our primary CAD software for 3D modelling, Adobe Illustrator to generate laser cutting files and Cura as our primary software to 3D print objects. This class will be partially lecture based and partially studio lead.​The overall goal of this course is to help students understand the steps involved in a design process by analyzing and critiquing the design of everyday objects through use cases as well as applying the knowledge they learn in class to design, prototype and fabricate their own tangible objects based on user needs and insights.

Format: In-person​. The instructor will teach remotely but students must be present on campus in order to utilize the fabrication lab for production. 

During the morning class meeting times on Tuesdays and Thursdays, Professor Lu will hold live Zoom lectures. On certain days, this will be followed by in-person practical demonstrations and training sessions of the 3D printer, the laser cutter and the CNC machine in the Fabrication Lab (FabLab), led by the course Teaching Assistant. You will have access to all tools and digital fabrication equipment once you have been given instructions on how to use them correctly and safely under the supervision of the FabLab TA. Our TA will also be on hand to help and oversee your progress throughout the course of the semester. 


Course schedule: 08:30 AM -- 11:30 AM Tue, Thu. Subject to change and will take into account students' and instructor's schedules and time zones.​

Journalism Courses (click here)

Journalism and Society in China, JOUR-SHU 203 (4 credits)

Instructor: David Maguire

Fulfills Global China Studies elective in "Chinese Media, Arts, and Literature"; Global Network Minor in Journalism Studies.

This four-credit course examines the role and functions of journalists and the media in Chinese society as modern reporting moves into the digital media landscape. To provide context to the political and cultural environment of news-gathering, the course assesses the development of journalism in China through the 20th century from around the birth of the Republic of China (1911) and through to the modern era. Through providing an understanding of the  parallel publishing environment of institutional traditional media ownership and today’s free-enterprise online media corporations, the unit studies how reporters operate in both. Students will gain an understanding of the strong nexus between government and media and the ever- present need for journalists  to portray various aspects of Chinese ideology at the same time as functioning as news reporters. The roles, functions and rounds of journalism as practiced in China will be studied through lectures, class discussion, in-class presentation activities and assignments and these will include reporting across all publishing platforms of politics, business, the environment and national issues. The impact of digital journalism will be an underlying theme through the course. The course structure will involve lectures, workshops, and seminars. There will be two 3-hour classes per week. Assignments will include a blend of in-class, group, and individual presentations and two written papers. Recorded lectures and powerpoint presentations will be posted in Classes for access anytime. There will also be mandatory Zoom sessions at set times for additional feedback and in-class sessions.

Format: Online
Course schedule: 01:00 PM -- 04:00 PM Tue, Thu. Subject to change and will take into account students' and instructor's time zones.

Summer Session II Courses (July 6-August 14)

Business and Mathematics Courses (click here)

Business Analytics, BUSF-SHU 210 (4 credits)

Instructor: Ying Rong

Fulfills NYU Shanghai Business Major Elective

Business analytics refers to the scientific process of transforming data into insight for making better decisions. Business analytics has enabled many businesses, nonprofits, and governments to improve their routine activities, to identify long-run decision opportunities, and sometimes to rethink the whole of their activities. In this sense, business analytics has tactical and strategic value; it is an important factor of value creation. This course introduces the basic concepts, principles and techniques of business analytics. In the first part of the course, we focus on prescriptive analytics, i.e., the use of optimization to support decision-making in the presence of a large number of alternatives and business constraints. In the second part, we focus on predictive analytics, i.e., how to use data to develop insights and predictive capabilities using machine learning, data mining, Monte Carlo simulation, and forecasting techniques. The course is entirely hands-on. You will learn how to apply business analytics to a wide array of business decision problems with the help of spreadsheet models. Examples will be drawn from production planning, inventory management, project management, advertising planning, customer retention, pricing and revenue management, capital budgeting, investment portfolio optimization, risk management, among others. The emphasis will be on model formulation and interpretation of results, not on mathematical theory.

Format: In-person unless circumstances require it to be moved online. ​
Course schedule: 08:30 AM -- 11:30 AM Mon, Wed

Professional Responsibility & Leadership, BUSF-SHU 221 (2 credits)

Instructor: Raymond Ro

Professional Responsibility and Leadership (PRL) is an interdisciplinary course designed to help students: Become more familiar with the variety of ethical dilemmas that can arise in the course of business practice & in one’s personal life; Understand the different values and principles that can inform and guide decision-making in such ambiguous and difficult situations; Gain experience articulating and defending courses of action as future societal & business leaders; and Begin the process of developing professional ethics in harmony with their own personal values. The format of the course is a discussion seminar. Each class session may include a variety of activities, including: discussion, in-class reading and writing, role-playing, and other participatory exercises. These various activities will be designed and facilitated by the instructor to allow students to engage in a reflective dialogue. These discussions draw from three different sources: 1) the students’ own personal experiences and values; 2) expert insights drawn from a variety of academic disciplines including philosophy, literature, history, and art, as well as the natural and social sciences; and 3) relevant business cases. In each class session, students consider a set of expert accounts identified by the instructor as starting points for discussion, and then they integrate their experiences with business cases that have personal relevance for them. The overarching themes of this dialogue include: 1) the relationship between business and society on a global, national and local basis; 2) the foundations of personal and professional business ethics; and 3) the exercise of leadership in organizations. These themes are developed in reference to a series of cases that have been either drawn from recent news reports on business practice or drafted specifically for this course by NYU Stern faculty. In this way, the PRL classroom is ‘flipped’ – the course focuses primarily on the students’ own interests and refines them both through dialogue and in reference to expert sources. Rather than involving the one-way dispensation of ‘content’ from faculty to student, the course unfolds as a ‘process’ of students and faculty working together in response to open-ended, age-old questions. While there may be no ‘right’ answer to such questions in the way that mathematical problems may be solved, still there are answers that are better or worse for individuals, organizations and societies. In this light, students are encouraged to challenge themselves and each other to make the world a better place, and to discover how they can thrive individually and collectively. Pre-requisits: None. Satisfies 2 credits of Business Major Non-Finance/Non-Marketing elective.

Format: In-person and online
Course schedule: 09:00 AM -- 12:00 PM Fri

Calculus, MATH-SHU 131 (4 credits)

Instructor: George Morrison

This course presents the foundations of calculus for functions of a single variable. Topics addressed include limits, continuity, rules of differentiation, approximation, antiderivatives, indefinite and definite integrals, the fundamental theorem of calculus, integration techniques, and improper integrals. The course can be used to fulfill the Calculus prerequisites of higher-level MATH-SHU courses. NYU Shanghai students pursuing the following NYU Shanghai majors will be able to use MATH-SHU 131 to fulfill NYU Shanghai major requirements: Economics, Natural Sciences, Mathematics, Data Science, Computer Science, Engineering.
Prerequisite: Placement via NYU SH Mathematics Placement Examination or a grade of C or better in MATH-SHU 009.

Format: In-person and online
Course schedule: Course schedule: 01:00 PM -- 04:00 PM (Lecture), 04:05 PM -- 05:25 PM (Recitation) Mon,Wed

Creative Writing Courses (click here)

Dramatic Writing, CRWR-SU 177T (4 credits)

Instructor: Aurorae Khoo

Fulfills Creative Writing Minor Elective

This class exposes students to a wide range of dramatic writing (script writing) for film, television, playwriting, adaptation, documentary “writing,” and new media. You will become a more confident and well-rounded writer by the end of this course. We will explore essential building blocks of writing for the screen – character, visualization, dialogue, scene structure, conflict, and sequence. You will learn techniques and be led through in-class writing exercises that let you tap into inspiration at will and not wait for it to haphazardly or infrequently strike. The class will culminate in your own individual script project (short or long), and the course can be adapted to address individual student’s needs. Critiques will be done in the workshop setting, which can handle writers of different levels. Thus, this class is appropriate for both beginning and advanced writers. It can be taken in conjunction with Summer Session 1: Collaborative Writing. Or it can be taken independently. ​

Format: Online
Course schedule: 09:00 AM -- 12:00 PM Tue, Thu

Computer Science Courses (click here)

Introduction to Computer Programming, CSCI-SHU 11 (4 credits)

Instructor: Lihua Xu

Equivalent to CSCI-UA 1 Introduction to Computer Programming. Note: Students who have already taken Introduction to Computer Science may not take this course.
Fulfills Computer Science Major Required Course

An introduction to the fundamentals of computer programming. Students design, write, and debug computer programs. No prior knowledge of programming is assumed. Students will learn programming using Python, a general purpose, cross-platform programming language with a clear, readable syntax. Most class periods will be part lecture, part lab as you explore ideas and put them into practice. This course is suitable for students not intending in majoring in computer science as well as for students intending to major in computer science but having no programming experience. Students with previous programming experience should instead take Introduction to Computer Science. Prerequisite: C in Pre-Calculus or placement out of Pre-Calculus. 

Format: In-person 
Course schedule: 08:30 AM -- 11:30 AM (Lecture), 11:35 AM -- 12:35 PM (Lab) Tue, Thu

Introduction to Computer Science, CSCI-SHU 101 (4 credits)

Instructor: Xianbin Gu

Equivalent to CSCI-UA 101 Introduction to Computer Science; CS-UH 1001 Introduction to Computer Science. Note: This course is taught in Python. Students who intend to go on to take CSCI-UA102 Data Structures at NYU New York CAS (which is taught in Java) will be required to take a Java placement exam prior to enrolling in CSCI-UA102 Data Structures at CAS.
Fulfills Computer Science Major Required Course


This course has three goals. First, the mastering of a modern object-oriented programming language, enough to allow students to tackle real-world problems of important significance. Second, gaining an appreciation of computational thinking, a process that provides the foundations for solving real-world problems. Finally, providing an overview of the very diverse and exciting field of computer science - a field which, arguably more than any other, impacts how we work, live, and play today. Prerequisite: Introduction to Computer Programming or Placement Exam.

Format: In-person 
Course schedule: 08:30 AM -- 11:30 AM (Lecture), 11:35 AM -- 12:35 PM (Lab) Mon,Wed

Data Structures, CSCI-SHU 210 (4 credits)

Instructor: Ratan Dey
Equivalent to CS-UH 1050 Data Structures; CSCI-UA 102 Data Structures
Fulfills Required CS/CE/DS course


Data structures are fundamental programming constructs which organize information in computer memory to solve challenging real-world problems. Data structures such as stacks, queues, linked lists, and binary trees, therefore constitute building blocks that can be reused, extended, and combined in order to make powerful programs. This course teaches how to implement them in a high-level language, how to analyze their effect on algorithm efficiency, and how to modify them to write computer programs that solve complex problems in a most efficient way. Programming assignments. Prerequisite: ICS, OR A in ICP, OR A- in ICP and enrolled in ICS concurrent to Data Structures. This course is taught in Python and assumes full knowledge of Python. 

Format: Online​
Course schedule: 08:30 AM -- 11:30 AM (Lecture), 11:35 AM-- 12:35 PM (Recitation) Mon, Wed. 

Computer Networking, CSCI-SHU 308 (4 credits)

Instructor: Promethee Spathis

This course takes a top-down approach to computer networking. After an overview of computer networks and the Internet, the course covers the application layer, transport layer, network layer and link layers. Topics at the application layer include client-server architectures, P2P architectures, DNS and HTTP and Web applications. Topics at the transport layer include multiplexing, connectionless transport and UDP, principles or reliable data transfer, connection-oriented transport and TCP and TCP congestion control. Topics at the network layer include forwarding, router architecture, the IP protocol and routing protocols including OSPF and BGP. Topics at the link layer include multiple-access protocols, ALOHA, CSMA/CD, Ethernet, CSMA/CA, wireless 802.11 networks and link layer switches. The course includes simple quantitative delay and throughput modeling, socket programming and network application development and Ethereal labs. Prerequisite: CSCI-101 or placement test. This course satisfies Major: CS Electives, EE Additional Electives.

Format: Online
Course schedule: 01:00 PM -- 04:00 PM Mon, Wed

Humanities and Global China Studies Courses (click here)

Hong Kong Cinema, GCHN-SHU 205 (4 credits)

Instructor: Ezra Claverie

Fulfills: Core Curriculum Humanistic Perspectives on China; Global China Studies major elective category “Chinese Media, Arts, and Literature”; Humanities Major Topics course or Advanced course

This course introduces students to the distinctive cinema of Hong Kong (HK). We will focus on the years between 1967 and 1997, when HK rose from regional to international prominence, then declined. We will approach HK cinema from four perspectives: geopolitical history, film genre, directorial style, and the economics of the film industry. Students will learn to see these perspectives not as mutually exclusive but as complementary, for we can best understand a film by thinking about it from multiple angles. Students will write two essays, the first analyzing a film made before 1980, and the second analyzing one made between 1980 and 2000. Each student will twice lead discussion of readings from the syllabus. In a small group project, students will do research on a topic relevant to the course, make a bibliography of their findings, and then present those findings to the class.

Format: In-person
Course schedule: 09:30 AM -- 12:00 PM (Lecture), 01:00 PM-- 4:00 PM (Recitation) Tue, Thu

Interactive Media Arts Courses (click here)

Unconventional Design + Interactions, INTM-SHU 224 (4 credits)

Instructor: Leon Lu

Fulfills IMA Elective

This class explores alternative frameworks of thinking to inform the design and making of objects, systems and experiences. The class is meant to provoke conversation around the idea of design and be critical and mindful of its impact. We explore alternative philosophies or frameworks of design which might go beyond making something functional, intuitive or aesthetically pleasing. We unpack the idea of intention behind design and encourage the act of design to be a creative, expressive and reflective process. This class is a studio led class where students will be asked to apply these frameworks in their own work as a response to design problems as well as further develop their own framework or methodology for design.

Format: In-person
Course schedule: 05:00 PM -- 08:00 PM Mon,Wed

Social Science Courses(Click here)

US-China Relations, SOCS-SHU 275 (4 credits)

Instructor: Ivan Willis Rasmussen

Fulfills Social Science Focus; GCS Elective; Humanities Topics; Core SSPC

This course examines the complexities of the bilateral relationship between the People’s Republic of China (China) and the United States (US), focusing on their historical rapport, major debates, and current relations. Topics include Sino-US economic relations, media reporting, variation in political systems, global politics, climate/energy issues, military affairs, and contested territories. Prerequisite: SOCS-SHU 160 is recommended, but not required.

Format: In-person ​
Course schedule: 01:00 PM -- 04:00 PM Mon, Wed