Summer Session Courses

Application Information
Tuition and Costs
9-week Chinese Language Immersion Program

Below are examples of previous summer courses. The course list for Summer 2022 will be updated in October 2021. 

Language Courses
Beginning and Elementary Chinese Courses - offered Session 1 and 2

Elementary Chinese II, CHIN-SHU 102 (4 credits, offered in Session 2 only)

Instructor:  Meng Wang (Session 2)

Equivalent to CHINL-AD 102 Elementary Chinese 2; EAST-UA 202 Elementary Chinese II.

This course is the second part of a one-year elementary-level Chinese course designed for students who have completed NYU-SH’s Elementary Chinese I or equivalent. It is designed to reinforce and further develop language skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing as it relates to everyday life situations. The objectives of the course are: (1) to continue mastering Chinese phonetic system (pinyin and tones); (2) to become further familiarized with the construction of commonly used Chinese Characters (both simplified and traditional); (3) to understand and use correctly basic Chinese grammar and sentence structures; (4) to continue building up essential vocabulary; (5) to read and write level appropriate passages (150-200 characters long); and (6) to become acquainted with aspects of Chinese culture and society related to the course materials.

Format: In-person
Course schedule: 08:30 -- 11:30 AM Mon, Tue, Thu, Fri.

Intermediate Chinese Courses - offered Session 1 and 2

Intermediate Chinese I, CHIN-SHU 201 (4 credits)

Instructor: Xiaoli Jin (Session 1, in-person), Meng Wang (Session 1, Online), Xiaoya Gu (Session 2)

Equivalent to CHINL-AD 201 Intermediate Chinese 1; EAST-UA 203 Intermediate Chinese I.

This course is the first part of a one-year intermediate-level Chinese course designed for students who have completed NYU-SH’s Elementary Chinese II or equivalent. It is designed to consolidate and develop overall aural-oral proficiency. Objectives are: (1) to be able to obtain information from the more extended conversation; (2) to express and expound on, in relative length, feelings and opinions on common topics; (3) to develop the vocabulary needed to discuss common topics and begin learning to decipher the meaning of compound words; (4) to develop reading comprehension of more extended narrative and expository passages; (5) to write, in relative length (200-250 characters long), personal narratives, informational narratives, comparison and discussion of viewpoints with level-appropriate vocabulary and grammatical accuracy, as well as basic syntactical cohesion; (6) to continue being acquainted with aspects of Chinese culture and society related to the course materials.

Format: In-person
Course schedule: 08:30 -- 11:30 AM Mon, Tue, Thu, Fri.

Intermediate Chinese II, CHIN-SHU 202 (4 credits)

Instructor: FeiFei Liu (Session 1), Qian Liu (Session 2, online)

Equivalent to CHINL-AD 202 Intermediate Chinese 2; EAST-UA 204 Intermediate Chinese II.

This course is the second part of a one-year intermediate-level Chinese course designed for students who have completed NYU-SH’s Intermediate Chinese I or equivalent. It is designed to continue consolidating and developing overall aural-oral proficiency, gradually focusing more on semi-formal or formal linguistic expressions. Objectives are: (1) to further develop competence in obtaining information from the more extended conversation; (2) to express and expound on, in more extended length, feelings, and opinions on socio-cultural topics; (3) to develop the more specialized vocabulary needed to discuss sociocultural topics; (4) to improve students’ ability to decipher meaning of compound words; (5) to further develop reading comprehension of extended narrative, expository and simple argumentative passages; (6) to learn to solve simple syntactical problems independently; (7) to write, in relative length (250-300) characters long) informational narratives, expository and simple argumentative passages with level-appropriate vocabulary and grammatical accuracy, as well as basic syntactical cohesion; and (7) to continue being acquainted with aspects of Chinese culture and society related to the course materials.

Format: In-person OR Online
Course schedule: 08:30 -- 11:30 AM Mon, Tue, Thu, Fri.

Advanced Chinese Courses - offered Session 1 and 2

Advanced Chinese I for Non-Heritage Students​, CHIN-SHU 301 (4 credits)

Instructor:  Ye Lu (Session 1, in-person), Jiani Lian (Session 1, Online), Xiaobo Shui (Session 2)

Equivalent to CHINL-AD 301 Advanced Chinese 1; EAST-UA 205 Advanced Chinese 1.

This course is the first part of a one-year Advanced Chinese course designed for students who have successfully completed Intermediate Chinese II at NYU-SH, or who have at least the equivalent knowledge of Chinese upon registration. It is designed to reinforce and further improve students’ overall communicative competence by incorporating semi-formal or formal usages. The objectives of the course are: (1) to learn to apply formal linguistic expressions in speaking and writing; (2) to acquire specialized vocabulary and patterns necessary for conducting formal discussions of socio-cultural topics; (3) to develop reading comprehension of texts with more advanced syntax; (4) to learn to make context-based guesses about the meaning of a new word and further enhance students’ ability to analyze as well as produce sentences with more complex syntactical features; (5) to learn to write expository and argumentative passages in more extended length; and (6) to learn to employ basic rhetoric devices in writing.

Format: In-person OR Online
Course schedule: 08:30 -- 11:30 AM Mon, Wed, Fri.

Advanced Chinese II for Non-Heritage Students​, CHIN-SHU 302 (4 credits)

Instructor: Jinghong Bi (Session 1), Chenchen Zhao (Session 2, in-perosn), Qing Li (ql15@nyu.edu)

Equivalent to CHINL-AD 302 Advanced Chinese 2; EAST-UA 206 Advanced Chinese 2.

This course is the second part of a one-year Advanced Chinese course designed for students who have successfully completed Advanced Chinese I at NYU-SH, or who have the equivalent knowledge of Chinese upon registration. It is designed to reinforce and further improve students’ overall communicative competence by incorporating semi-formal or formal usages. The objectives of the course are: (1) to enhance further students’ oral and written communicative competence using formal linguistic expressions; (2) to expand further specialized vocabulary and patterns necessary for conducting formal discussions of socio-cultural topics relevant to today’s China; (3) to improve further students’ reading comprehension of texts with more advanced syntax; (4) to develop further their competence in making context-based guess about the meaning of a new word, and further enhance ability to analyze as well as produce sentences with more complex syntactical features; (5) to improve further their ability to write expository and argumentative passages in more extended length; (6) to improve their ability to effectively employ basic rhetoric devices in writing.

Format: In-person
Course schedule: 08:30 -- 11:30 AM Mon, Wed, Fri.

Summer Session I Courses (Sample)
Business Courses

Foundations of Finance, BUSF-SHU 202 (4 credits)

Instructor: Offer Moshe Shapir

Equivalent to ECON-UH 2510 Foundations of Financial Markets; FINC-UB 2 Foundations of Finance
Fulfills Business Core Course.
Prerequisites: BUSF-SHU 101 Statistics for Business and Economics and ECON-SHU 150 Microeconomics.


This course is a rigorous, quantitative introduction to financial market structures and financial asset valuation. The main topics of the course are financial markets, arbitrage, portfolio selection, equilibrium asset pricing, fixed income securities and option pricing. You are expected to understand valuation formulas and be able to apply them to new problems. The appropriate tools necessary for solving these problems will be developed at each stage and practiced in the homework assignments. The models we will cover have immediate applications and implications for real-world financial decisions. To take this course, students must be comfortable with statistics, linear algebra, calculus, and microeconomics.​

Format: Online
Course Schedule:  01:00 -- 04:00 PM (Lecture), 04:05 -- 05:05 PM (Recitation) Mon, Wed

Principles of Financial Accounting, BUSF-SHU 250 (4 credits)

Instructors: Chen Li

Equivalent to ECON-UH 1501 Introduction to Accounting; ACCT-UB 1 Principles of Accounting.
Fulfills Business Core Course.

Develops students’ abilities to understand business transactions and financial statements and to determine the most appropriate financial measures for these events. Investigates the underlying rationale for accounting practices and assesses their effectiveness in providing useful information for decision making. Emphasis is placed on accounting practices that purport to portray corporate financial position, operating results, cash flows, manager performance, and financial strength. 

Format: In-person
Course schedule: 01:00 -- 04:00 PM (Lecture), 04:05 -- 05:05 PM (Recitation) Mon, Wed

Investing and Financing in and with China, BUSF-SHU 206 (4 credits)

Instructor: David Yu

Prerequisites: Foundations of Finance and Economics of Global Business (or Macroeconomics). Corporate Finance is recommended but not required.​

What does it take to be successful in China? How do domestic and foreign businesses do in the world's most dynamic economy? How do Chinese entrepreneurs work in a dynamic country? How do investors think about cross border investing into and out of China? How do investors think about cross border investing into and out of China? What are the leading opportunities in Chinese markets today? How are Chinese firms reshaping global business? Course overview This course is designed to prepare students for a good overview of investments, financing as well as conducting business in and with China. The class format will include lectures, case studies, discussions, guest speakers and student presentations to explore the opportunities and risks of international and domestic investments in China as well and the outward expansion of Chinese firms. The course will be require the student's active participation and parts will involve group work. Leading industry guest speakers and a site tour may be arranged for further learning enhancement, schedules permitting. The course materials will draw heavily on the lecturer's experiences. Target students / audience The target students are NYU Shanghai business & finance majors, economics majors and study abroad students from Stern. This course is suitable for any student interested in understanding international business, emerging markets, investments, cross border business and China. No prior knowledge or experience with China's business environment is required.

Format: In-person​
Course Schedule:
12:30-5:00 PM on May 28, June 4
9:30 AM-12:30 PM, 2:30-5:30 PM on May 31, June 7, June 11, June 21, and June 28
1:00-4:00 PM on June 18

Management and Organizations, MGMT-SHU 301 (4 credits)

Instructor: Raymond Ro

Equivalent to BUSOR-AD 115 Management & Organizations; MGMT-UB 1 (9001) Management & Organizations.
Fulfills Business Elective.


This course addresses contemporary management challenges stemming from changing organizational structures, complex environmental conditions, new technological developments, and increasingly diverse workforces. It highlights critical management issues involved in planning, organizing, controlling, and leading an organization. Ultimately, it aims to strengthen students’ managerial potential by providing general frameworks for analyzing, diagnosing, and responding to both fundamental and complex organizational situations. It also provides opportunities for students to enhance their communication and interpersonal skills, which are essential to effective management. The structure of the course encourages learning at multiple levels: through in-class lectures, exercises, and discussions; in small teams carrying out projects; and in individual reading, study, and analysis. 

Format: In-person
Course schedule: 09:00 AM -- 12:00 PM Tue, Thu

Professional Responsibility & Leadership, BUSF-SHU 221 (2 credits)

Instructor: Raymond Ro

Professional Responsibility and Leadership (PRL) is an interdisciplinary course designed to help students: Become more familiar with the variety of ethical dilemmas that can arise in the course of business practice & in one’s personal life; Understand the different values and principles that can inform and guide decision-making in such ambiguous and difficult situations; Gain experience articulating and defending courses of action as future societal & business leaders; and Begin the process of developing professional ethics in harmony with their own personal values. The format of the course is a discussion seminar. Each class session may include a variety of activities, including: discussion, in-class reading and writing, role-playing, and other participatory exercises. These various activities will be designed and facilitated by the instructor to allow students to engage in a reflective dialogue. These discussions draw from three different sources: 1) the students’ own personal experiences and values; 2) expert insights drawn from a variety of academic disciplines including philosophy, literature, history, and art, as well as the natural and social sciences; and 3) relevant business cases. In each class session, students consider a set of expert accounts identified by the instructor as starting points for discussion, and then they integrate their experiences with business cases that have personal relevance for them. The overarching themes of this dialogue include: 1) the relationship between business and society on a global, national and local basis; 2) the foundations of personal and professional business ethics; and 3) the exercise of leadership in organizations. These themes are developed in reference to a series of cases that have been either drawn from recent news reports on business practice or drafted specifically for this course by NYU Stern faculty. In this way, the PRL classroom is ‘flipped’ – the course focuses primarily on the students’ own interests and refines them both through dialogue and in reference to expert sources. Rather than involving the one-way dispensation of ‘content’ from faculty to student, the course unfolds as a ‘process’ of students and faculty working together in response to open-ended, age-old questions. While there may be no ‘right’ answer to such questions in the way that mathematical problems may be solved, still there are answers that are better or worse for individuals, organizations and societies. In this light, students are encouraged to challenge themselves and each other to make the world a better place, and to discover how they can thrive individually and collectively. Pre-requisits: None. Satisfies 2 credits of Business Major Non-Finance/Non-Marketing elective.

Format: In-person 
Course schedule: 01:00 -- 04:00 PM Wed

Computer Science Courses

Introduction to Computer Programming, CSCI-SHU 11
(4 credits)

Instructor: Olivier Marin

Equivalent to CSCI-UA 1 Introduction to Computer Programming. Note: Students who have already taken Introduction to Computer Science may not take this course.
Fulfills Computer Science Major Required Course and Algorithmic Thinking (AT) Core Curriculum.
Prerequisite: C in Pre-Calculus or placement out of Pre-Calculus. 

An introduction to the fundamentals of computer programming. Students design, write, and debug computer programs. No prior knowledge of programming is assumed. Students will learn programming using Python, a general purpose, cross-platform programming language with a clear, readable syntax. Most class periods will be part lecture, part lab as you explore ideas and put them into practice. This course is suitable for students not intending in majoring in computer science as well as for students intending to major in computer science but having no programming experience. Students with previous programming experience should instead take Introduction to Computer Science. 

Format: In-person 
Course schedule: 08:30 AM -- 11:30 AM (Lecture), 11:35 AM -- 12:35 PM (Recitation) Mon, Wed. 

Discrete Mathematics, CSCI-SHU 2314 (4 credits)

Instructor: Pingping Ding

Equivalent to CS-UH 1002 Discrete Mathematics; MATH-UA 120 Discrete Mathematics.
Fulfills Computer Science Major Required Course.

This course is an introduction to discrete mathematics, emphasizing proof and abstraction, as well as applications to the computational sciences. Topics include sets, relations, and functions, graphs and trees, algorithms, proof techniques, and order of magnitude analysis, Boolean algebra and combinatorial circuits, formal logic and languages, automata, and combinatorics, probability, and statistics.
Co-requisite MATH-SHU 121 or MATH-SHU 201. Equivalent to MATH-UA 120.

Format: In-person
Course schedule: 01:00 PM -- 04:00 PM (Lecture), 04:05pm -- 05:05pm (Recitation) Mon, Wed.

Data Structures, CSCI-SHU 210 (4 credits)

Instructor: Olivier Marin

Equivalent to CS-UH 1050 Data Structures; CSCI-UA 102 Data Structures.
Fulfills Required CS/CE/DS Course.
Prerequisite: ICS, OR A in ICP, OR A- in ICP and enrolled in ICS concurrent to Data Structures. This course is taught in Python and assumes full knowledge of Python.

Data structures are fundamental programming constructs which organize information in computer memory to solve challenging real-world problems. Data structures such as stacks, queues, linked lists, and binary trees, therefore constitute building blocks that can be reused, extended, and combined in order to make powerful programs. This course teaches how to implement them in a high-level language, how to analyze their effect on algorithm efficiency, and how to modify them to write computer programs that solve complex problems in a most efficient way. Programming assignments. 

Format: In-person
Course schedule: 08:30 AM -- 11:30 AM (Lecture), 11:35 AM -- 12:35 PM (Recitation) Tue, Thu

Economics Courses

Principles of Macroeconomics, ECON-SHU 1 (4 credits)

Instructor: Aleksandar Stojanovic

Equivalent to ECON-UA 1 Introduction to Macroeconomics.

Focuses on the economy as a whole (the "macroeconomy"). Begins with the meaning and measurement of important macroeconomic data (on unemployment, inflation, and production), then turns to the behavior of the overall economy. Topics include long-run economic growth and the standard of living; the causes and consequences of economic booms and recessions; the banking system and the Federal Reserve; the role of government policy; and international trade. 

Format: In-person
Course Schedule:  01:00 PM -- 04:00 PM  (Lecture), 04:05 PM -- 05:05 PM (Recitation) Tue, Thu

Microeconomics, ECON-SHU 3 (4 credits)

Instructor: Offer Shapir

Equivalent to ECON-UA 2 Intro to Microeconomics.
Prerequisites: Calculus (MATH-SHU 121 or 201).


Economics studies how agents make decisions under conditions of scarcity and uncertainty. This course provides a rigorous introduction to economics, with special emphasis on microeconomics. It will introduce you to economics as a discipline and as a way of thinking. It will also provide you with a set of tools, which will be very useful in other economics courses. We will first study the behavior of individual consumers and firms. Then we will give you some insight into how markets work and whether market outcomes are desirable. We will also look at situations in which the firm is a monopolist, or competes with a limited number of rivals. Some key concepts we will introduce include economic incentives, marginal analysis, opportunity cost (which costs matter), market efficiency (what does it mean for a market to work) and strategic behavior (how to predict and respond to your rivals’ decisions). The tools that you will be acquainted with in this class are fundamental for most upper division courses of the Economics major as well as classes in Finance, Accounting and Marketing. 

Format: Online
Course Schedule: 01:00 PM -- 04:00 PM (Lecture), 04:05 PM -- 05:05 PM (Recitation) Tue, Thu

Econometrics, ECON-SHU 301 (4 credits)

Equivalent to ECON-UA 266 Intro to Econometrics.
Prerequisite: Statistics (BUSF-SHU 101 OR MATH-SHU 235 OR MATH-SHU 233 OR ECON-UA 18 OR STAT-UB 103 OR STAT-UB 1 OR MATH-GA 2901 OR SOCSC-UH 1010Q OR ECON-UA 20). 


Instructor: Luyao Zhang

The course examines a number of important areas of econometrics. The topics covered include regression analysis with cross-sectional data; classical linear regression model and extensions; model specification, estimation and inference; regression with qualitative variables; heteroskedasticity and GLS; serial correlation and heteroskedasticity in time series regression. In addition to covering the relevant theoretical issues, the course includes the application of these methods to economic data. 

Format: In-person
Course Schedule: 01:00 PM -- 04:00 PM (Lecture), 04:05 PM -- 05:05 PM (Recitation) Mon, Wed

Humanities and Global China Studies Courses

Chinese Science Fictions, GCHN-SHU 208 (4 credits)

Instructor: Ezra Claverie

Fulfills Humanistic Perspectives on China (HPC) Core Curriculum; Old Humanities Requirements: Topics course; New Humanities Requirements: Advanced course; Introductory course; GCS Elective "Chinese Media, Arts, and Literature.

This course will introduce students to approaches to studying Chinese science fiction (SF) in three different forms: short stories, novels, and movies. We will approach the question of what makes a given story “science fiction” as well as what makes a Chinese SF story “Chinese” besides the passport or first language of its author. We will look at such enduring topics as artificial intelligence, non-human intelligence, the extension of human life, and dystopian futures, and the ways that the demands of art, censorship, and commerce shape their representation in SF. Students will read a handful of British and American SF stories to help introduce the genre before moving into Chinese prose fiction (in English translation) and movies (in Cantonese or Mandarin, with English subtitles). Scholarly analyses of SF as a genre and histories of SF in Mainland China will equip students with analytical frameworks to apply to the fictional texts they encounter both in the syllabus and in their outside reading.

Format: In-person
Course schedule: 08:30 -- 11:30 AM Tue, Thu

Shanghai Cinema Legacy and Contemporary Chinese Film/Media Industry, CCCF-SHU 110 (4 credits)

Instructor: Zhen Zhang

Fulfills Humanistic Perspectives on China (HPC) Core Curriculum; Global Chinese studies, Chinese Media, Arts, and Literature elective; Humanities topics course; and an Introductory course in the Humanities major. 

Taking advantage of the location of NYU Shanghai, the course serves as a ground-level introduction to the legacy of Shanghai film culture and Chinese film industry and screen culture in the region today.  Our approaches will be a combination of in-class discussions and screenings related to Shanghai cinema history (from cultural geography, infrastructure, silent classics to the advent of sound, etc.) and contemporary film/media culture formations. There will also be a visit to a shooting base or a relevant institution near or outside of Shanghai. Students are expected to engage in collaborative and individual research related to readings, screenings, and case studies, and give presentations on the findings. 

Format: In-person 
Course schedule: 01:00 PM -- 04:00 PM Mon, Wed​

Interactive Media Arts and Interactive Media and Business Courses

Creative Learning Design, IMBX-SHU 241 (4 credits)

Instructor: Alex Ruthmann

In this course, students will work in teams to design digital learning resources and experience designs at the intersection of music, coding, arts, and technology. The course will begin with an introduction to emerging trends in learner engagement and design-based research, especially related to web- and mobile-based musical experiences and principles of making music with new media. Innovations in and applications of musical creativity, interactive technologies, user-centered design &  engagement, scaffolded learning, creative learning, pedagogies of play and making,  and educational entrepreneurship in Chinese contexts will also be explored. 

The market for creative educational experiences in afterschool settings for youth in  China is exploding. For-profit educational service companies are competing and searching for differentiated, learning experiences in music, coding, and creative project-based learning that will attract high-paying parents looking for the best supplemental education for their children. This practical, hands-on course will explore questions such as: How can we design engaging, creative learning experiences that are relevant to the cultural goals and needs of today’s youth in China, while laying the foundation for creative learning for the workforce of tomorrow? What are engaging, effective creative learning resources, and how are they best implemented in Chinese learning settings?  How can we take advantage of young people’s near ubiquitous love of music and technology to facilitate creative learning? 

Students will work together in teams and paired with a partner audience of learners and teachers in Shanghai drawn from local and regional international schools (e.g. Alibaba’s  Cloud Valley), local afterschool programs (e.g., Music Lab), and cultural partners (e.g.,  Shanghai Symphony). Together they will assess the needs and opportunities of partner students and teachers, and engage in a two-stage iterative and reflective co-design process prototyping custom learning resources and experience designs with their partner end users. At the end of the course, students will present and demo their learning resources as part of a public showcase to an external audience of partners,  educators, technologists, musicians, entrepreneurs, and experience designers in  Shanghai.  

Format: In-person​. 
Course schedule: 01:00 -- 04:00 PM Tue, Thu.

Mathematics Courses

Calculus 1, MATH-SHU 121 (4 credits)

Instructor: Joseba Dalmau

Equivalent to MATH-UA 121 Calculus 1. Note: This course will not be recognized as fulfilling the Calculus prerequisites of higher-level MATH-SHU courses. Students pursuing the following majors will therefore not be able to use this MATH-SHU 121 to fulfill major requirements: Economics, Natural Sciences, Mathematics, Data Science, Computer Science, Engineering.

This course presents the foundations of calculus for functions of a single variable. Topics addressed include limits, continuity, rules of differentiation, antiderivatives, definite integrals and the fundamental theorem of calculus.

Format: Online & In-person ​
Course schedule: 01:00 PM -- 04:00 PM Mon, Wed

Social Science Courses

Introduction to Psychology, PSYC-SHU 101 (4 credits)

Instructor: Friederike Funk

Fulfill Experimental Discovery in the Natural World (ED) Core Curriculum.

This course highlights the fundamental principles and interesting experiments within the field of psychology, aiming to help students understand mind and behavior of themselves and others. It provides a comprehensive overview of scientific study of thought and behavior, covering a wide range of topics such as the biological and evolutionary bases of behavior, sensation and perception, learning, memory, intelligence and thinking, lifespan development, emotion and motivation, human personality, social behavior, behavioral disorders, and psychological treatment of disorders. Opportunities to apply knowledge gained in class are available through various in-class and out-of-class activities. By the end of this course you will have gained a much better understanding and appreciation of who you are and how you work.

Format: In-person
Course schedule: 9:00 AM -- 12:00 PM (Lecture), 12:05 -- 12:25 PM ( Recitation) Mon, Wed

Social Change in Contemporary China, SOCS-SHU 270 (4 credits)

Instructor: Xiaogang Wu

Fulfills Social Science Perspectives on China (SSPC) Core Curriculum.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or above required.


This course surveys post-1949 Chinese society, focusing on socioeconomic changes since 1978. It draws from scholarly work on China in sociology, economics, and political science. It explores the basic institutional make-up of Chinese society, the structural changes brought forth in the economic reform era, and how these institutions configure social life in contemporary China. Attention is paid to both changes from and continuities with the pre-reform past. After taking this course, students will be equipped with background information necessary to understand China’s complex economic, political, and social phenomena, and the impact of reform on social structures/institutions, individuals’ life chances, and social relations in contemporary China. 

Format: In-person
Course schedule: 01:00 -- 04:00 PM Mon, Wed

The Chinese Family, SOCS-SHU 236 (4 credits)

Instructor: Xuan Li

Fulfills Social Science Perspectives on China (SSPC) Core Curriculum.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or above.


The family, one of the key social units, has changed significantly over time around the globe. While traditional Chinese families were governed by Confucian ethics, Chinese families in the 20th century have also been shaped by state policies, modernization, and globalization. This course introduces students to family values and practices around marriage, reproduction, parenting, and intergenerational care in Chinese societies, especially in their modern history. It also contextualizes family values and practices and their transitions within broader demographic, social, and cultural changes in the Chinese and international settings. In this course, students engage with historical and modern cultural artifacts as well as scholarly work on Chinese families, and reflect on their own experiences with, observations of, and beliefs about Chinese families. In this way, students develop a nuanced way of understanding and analyzing family-related issues in the Chinese and global contexts. 

Format: In-person
Course schedule: 01:00 -- 04:00 PM Mon, Wed

Summer Session II Courses (Sample)
Business and Economics Courses

Principles of Financial Accounting, BUSF-SHU 250 (4 credits)

Instructors: Jing Dai

Equivalent to ECON-UH 1501 Introduction to Accounting; ACCT-UB 1 Principles of Accounting.
Fulfills Business Core Course.

Develops students’ abilities to understand business transactions and financial statements and to determine the most appropriate financial measures for these events. Investigates the underlying rationale for accounting practices and assesses their effectiveness in providing useful information for decision making. Emphasis is placed on accounting practices that purport to portray corporate financial position, operating results, cash flows, manager performance, and financial strength. 

Format: In-person
Course schedule: 01:00 -- 04:00 PM (Lecture), 04:05 -- 05:05 PM (Recitation) Mon, Wed

Introduction to Game Theory, ECON-SHU 216 (4 credits)

Instructors: Luyao Zhang

Pre-requisites: MATH-SHU 121 OR 201.

This course introduces students to the basic concepts and tools of game theory and their applications to real-life situations. It starts with basic terms such as strategies, payoffs, and equilibrium, and then goes through different types of games, such as extensive form games, normal form games, dynamic games and games with incomplete information. The second half of the course covers a selection of topics closely related to the real world, such as cold war, voting, bargaining and auction. Students will be able to analyze the situation, frame it in terms of the tools discussed, and understand the strategies used in the interaction. 

Format: In-person
Course schedule: 01:00 -- 04:00 PM Mon, Wed

History of Modern Economic Growth: Exploring China, ECON-SHU 238 (4 credits)

Instructors: Ilaf Elard

Fulfills Social Science Perspectives on China (SSPC) Core Curriculum.

This course has two goals: 1) to provide understanding of economic development and growth with applications to the Chinese economy and Chinese institutions, and (2) to learn how to analyse major policies in China's economic development in both oral and written form. China has experienced rapid institutional changes and achieved high growth rates. We start with (i) the pre-modern and early-modern historical background of this transition process and then move on to analyse (ii) the roots and pattern of economic growth in modern China. Topics include: The great divergence between poor and rich countries; introduction to global economic history; why the industrial revolution did not take place in China's Yangtze River Delta first; economic catch up by the rest of the West; state-led big push industrialisation; the ancient Chinese economy's high-level equilibrium trap; the Needham Question; the Chinese economy prior to 1949; modern China's early reform era 1949-78; the developmental state; market transition post-1978; modern Chinese growth and structural change.

Format: In-person
Course schedule: 01:00 -- 04:00 PM Tue, Thu

Computer Science Courses

Discrete Mathematics, CSCI-SHU 2314 (4 credits)

Instructor: Laurent Mertz

Equivalent to CS-UH 1002 Discrete Mathematics; MATH-UA 120 Discrete Mathematics.
Fulfills Computer Science Major Required Course and Algorithmic Thinking (AT) Core Curriculum.

This course is an introduction to discrete mathematics, emphasizing proof and abstraction, as well as applications to the computational sciences. Topics include sets, relations, and functions, graphs and trees, algorithms, proof techniques, and order of magnitude analysis, Boolean algebra and combinatorial circuits, formal logic and languages, automata, and combinatorics, probability, and statistics.
Co-requisite MATH-SHU 121 or MATH-SHU 201. Equivalent to MATH-UA 120.

Format: In-person
Course schedule: 01:00 PM -- 04:00 PM (Lecture), 04:05pm -- 05:05pm (Recitation) Mon, Wed.

Introduction to Computer Science, CSCI-SHU 101 (4 credits)

Instructor: Xianbin Gu

Equivalent to CSCI-UA 101 Introduction to Computer Science; CS-UH 1001 Introduction to Computer Science. Note: This course is taught in Python. Students who intend to go on to take CSCI-UA102 Data Structures at NYU New York CAS (which is taught in Java) will be required to take a Java placement exam prior to enrolling in CSCI-UA102 Data Structures at CAS.
Fulfills Computer Science Major Required Course and Algorithmic Thinking (AT) Core Curriculum.
Prerequisite: Introduction to Computer Programming or Placement Exam.


This course has three goals. First, the mastering of a modern object-oriented programming language, enough to allow students to tackle real-world problems of important significance. Second, gaining an appreciation of computational thinking, a process that provides the foundations for solving real-world problems. Finally, providing an overview of the very diverse and exciting field of computer science - a field which, arguably more than any other, impacts how we work, live, and play today. 

Format: In-person 
Course schedule: 08:30 AM -- 11:30 AM (Lecture), 11:35 AM -- 12:35 PM (Lab) Mon,Wed

Introduction to Computer Programming, CSCI-SHU 11 (4 credits)

Instructor: Lihua Xu

Equivalent to CSCI-UA 1 Introduction to Computer Programming. Note: Students who have already taken Introduction to Computer Science may not take this course.
Fulfills Computer Science Major Required Course.
Prerequisite: C in Pre-Calculus or placement out of Pre-Calculus. 

 

An introduction to the fundamentals of computer programming. Students design, write, and debug computer programs. No prior knowledge of programming is assumed. Students will learn programming using Python, a general purpose, cross-platform programming language with a clear, readable syntax. Most class periods will be part lecture, part lab as you explore ideas and put them into practice. This course is suitable for students not intending in majoring in computer science as well as for students intending to major in computer science but having no programming experience. Students with previous programming experience should instead take Introduction to Computer Science. 

Format: In-person 
Course schedule: 01:00 PM -- 04:00 PM (Lecture), 04:05 PM -- 05:05 PM (Recitation) Mon, Wed. 

Databases, CSCI-SHU 213 (4 credits)

Instructor: Lihua Xu

Fulfills Computer Science Elective; Data Science Major Required Courses.
Prerequisite: Data Structures

The course covers modeling an application and logical database design, the relational model and relational data definition and data manipulation languages, design of relational databases and normalization theory, physical database design, query processing and optimization, transaction processing focusing on concurrency and recovery. The labs emphasize experiential learning of database systems and applications and an insight into various database management systems and query languages.

Format: In-person 
Course schedule: 01:00 PM -- 04:00 PM  Tue, Thu. 

Interactive Media Arts Courses

After Us: Posthuman Media, INTM-SHU 195 (4 credits)

Instructor: Bogna Konior

What is the place of human creativity, agency and intelligence in complex technical networks? This class aims to build a foundation for studying how automation, artificial intelligence, robotics, digital image production, predictive software, and eco-technologies signal the ascent of a posthuman society. It provides a selection of texts and case studies that introduce basic philosophical and sociological questions about posthuman technologies and support creators, writers and thinkers in conceptualizing the posthuman nature of new media. The class is a combination of lectures and writing workshops.

Format: In-person​. 
Course schedule: 09:30 AM -- 12:30 PM Tue, Thu.

Mathematics Courses

Calculus, MATH-SHU 131 (4 credits)

Instructor: George Morrison

Prerequisite: Placement via NYU SH Mathematics Placement Examination or a grade of C or better in MATH-SHU 009.

This course presents the foundations of calculus for functions of a single variable. Topics addressed include limits, continuity, rules of differentiation, approximation, antiderivatives, indefinite and definite integrals, the fundamental theorem of calculus, integration techniques, and improper integrals. The course can be used to fulfill the Calculus prerequisites of higher-level MATH-SHU courses. NYU Shanghai students pursuing the following NYU Shanghai majors will be able to use MATH-SHU 131 to fulfill NYU Shanghai major requirements: Economics, Natural Sciences, Mathematics, Data Science, Computer Science, Engineering. 

Format: Online & In-person
Course schedule: 01:00 -- 04:00 PM (Lecture), 04:05pm -- 05:25 PM (Recitation) Tue, Thu

Social Science Courses

Urbanization in China, SOCS-SHU 133 (4 credits)

Instructor: ChengHe Guan

Fulfills Social Science Perspectives on China (SSPC) Core Curriculum.

This course introduces urbanization in China in the context of the East Asian region and globalization. By examination of the development of selected cities and discussion of experimental urban themes, this course aims to depict prevalent patterns of urbanization at appropriate levels, such as neighborhood types, metropolitan areas, and regional urban agglomeration. We examine traditional forms of settlement and place more recent urban phenomena in a broader historical perspective. We explore relevant political traditions and forms of planning administration to reveal underlying social, economic, cultural and environmental circumstances at work, while learning tools and methods of spatial analysis that can be applied to the study of cities all over the world.

Format: In-person ​
Course schedule: 01:00 PM -- 04:00 PM Tue, Thu

US-China Relations, SOCS-SHU 275 (4 credits)

Instructor: Ivan Willis Rasmussen

Fulfills Social Science Focus; GCS Elective; Humanities Topics; Social Science Perspectives on China (SSPC) Core Curriculum.
Prerequisite: SOCS-SHU 160 is recommended, but not required.


This course examines the complexities of the bilateral relationship between the People’s Republic of China (China) and the United States (US), focusing on their historical rapport, major debates, and current relations. Topics include Sino-US economic relations, media reporting, variation in political systems, global politics, climate/energy issues, military affairs, and contested territories. 

Format: In-person ​
Course schedule: 01:00 PM -- 04:00 PM Mon, Wed