COVID-19 Updates for the NYU Shanghai Community

Live Updates

This page contains the latest information available to NYU Shanghai about the COVID-19 pandemic, useful links, and FAQs.

NYU Shanghai Community Members: Please click here to log in with your NetID to see memos and announcements issued regarding the university's response to the virus.

Latest information about COVID-19

Last Updated: May 14, 2021 11:44 AM, China Standard Time

By NYU Shanghai
Relevance: All NYU Shanghai

Daily Situation Reports

World Health Organization daily situation reports
Bloomberg Covid-19 Vaccine Tracker
CDC 2019 COVID-19 Situation Summary
Latest statistics on Coronavirus with info about cases in Shanghai by District (Chinese)
COVID-19 Dashboard Tracking Global Cases (by Johns Hopkins CSSE)
Shine.cn Updates on the Coronavirus Epidemic (Shanghai-related news)
Coronavirus Live Updates (New York Times)

Shanghai
Confirmed cases (cumulative): 2026
Current cases: 55
Deaths: 7
Recovered: 1964

NYU Shanghai: 2*

*Two students tested positive for COVID-19 after studying away in London. Both have since recovered.

Useful Information

Advising Information for Spring 2021

Class of 2024 FAQs

Spring 2021 Academic Calendar
NYU Shanghai Teaching & Learning Toolkits
NYU COVID-19 Updates Page
New Access Restrictions to NYU Shanghai Campus/Residence Halls (PDF)

Contact Information

Department Email/Phone number
Undergraduate advising shanghai.advising@nyu.edu
Graduate Office shanghai.ogae@nyu.edu
NYU's Office of Global Programs global.admissions@nyu.edu
Public Safety shanghai.publicsafety@nyu.edu | 021-2059-5500
Human Resources shanghai.hr@nyu.edu | 13764511733
Wellness Exchange 021-2059-9999
Office of Research shanghai.research@nyu.edu
General Inquiries nyushanghai@nyu.edu

Shanghai East Medical Center (NYU Shanghai’s designated hospital for all suspected cases)
No.150, Jimo Road, Pudong New Area (Line 2 Dongchang RD Station Exit 1)
Tel: 021-3880 4518
上海市浦东新区即墨路150号, 近浦东大道(2号线东昌路站1号口)电话: 021-3880 4518

Health and Safety Tips

  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. Use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol if soap and water are not available.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
  • Stay home when you are sick.
  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces.
  • Wear a mask in all public spaces.

Faculty Work on COVID-19

​​Letter from Shanghai The Hudson Review, ​Larry Wolff -- Silver Professor of European History at New York University
18 Lessons of Quarantine Urbanism Strelka Mag, Benjamin Bratton, Visiting Professor of Interactive Media Arts
Faculty Research on COVID-19

2 weeks 5 days ago
Important COVID-19 Vaccine Updates | Sign Up for On-Campus Vaccine on April 29-30
To: NYU Shanghai Community
From:
  • Public Safety
Relevance: Students, Faculty, and Staff

Dear colleagues and students:

We are pleased to announce that we will offer the second dose of the COVID-19 vaccine Thursday April 29th, and Friday April 30th on campus on the 15th Floor of the Academic Building. We just received the confirmed arrangement from the Pudong Health Bureau this morning, and we are sorry for this short notice.

If you have taken the first dose on campus on April 8 or 9, please select the time for your second dose of the COVID-19 vaccine

Please complete the Vaccine Sign-up Form to select the time and date to get your second dose of vaccine on campus, and go directly to 15F at your time of appointment with your ID or passport.

Please note that 

  1. If you took the first shot on April 8, please select a time slot on April 29. And if you took the first shot on April 9, please select a time slot on April 30.

  2. If you have taken the first shot at an off-campus location, and with an interval of 21 days through April 29 or April 30, you may also take this convenience to receive your second shot on campus.

If you missed the first shot on April 8 & 9 but would like to take this chance for your first one, please follow the steps below for registration and appointment scheduling. In this case, you will need to complete your second shot on your own at an off-campus clinic.

Step 1: Register on WeChat Mini-program "健康云pro" or app “健康云”

**Those who have already registered, please go directly to Step 2.** 

Note: you must enter “Shanghai East Hospital” when prompted by the system for your "vaccination clinic." And do NOT “Schedule an appointment for the first dose” when you finish the registration.

Step 2: Select the time for your on-campus vaccine

Please complete this Vaccine Sign-up Form to select the time and date to get your vaccine on campus. 

If you need to complete your second shot of COVID-19 vaccine on your own at an off-campus medical facility in either case, you may refer to the instructions below for appointment scheduling.

  • Mainland China ID holders and Hong Kong, Macao, Taiwan passport holders: Please go to the Weifang Community Health Center near the campus for a walk-in vaccine appointment, at least 21 days apart from your first shot. Here is the location and hours:

潍坊社区卫生服务中心:崂山路639号 

Weifang Community Health Service Center: 639, Lao Shan Road

接种时间(请带好身份证或其他用于登记疫苗接种意愿的证件): 周一至周六 7:30 am - 5pm (Walk-in Appointment)

Operating time (Please bring your ID card) : Monday - Saturday 7:30 am - 5pm

  • All other passport holders: You can register and make an appointment on your own in your residential or employer’s community using these instructions. Note: you may still choose “Shanghai East Hospital” as the vaccination clinic, but you may need to select a different date and go to the hospital on your own. In this case you will need to pay for the COVID-19 vaccine, but the cost can be reimbursed through your health insurance. For details, please contact shanghai.hr.help@nyu.edu (faculty and staff) or shanghai.health@nyu.edu (students).

If you have health-related questions about the vaccine: Please first review the Student Health Center’s COVID-19 Vaccine Q&A. Any further questions can be sent to shanghai.health@nyu.edu.

If you have questions about registering on the app or scheduling your on-campus vaccine: Please stop by the Public Safety Command Center at Room 118 in the Academic Building at any time. You are also welcomed to email us at shanghai.publicsafety@nyu.edu, or call us at (86)(21)20595500.

Best regards,

Student Health Center & Public Safety

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3 weeks 4 days ago
COVID-19 Vaccine Updates | Dates of the Second Dose on Campus
To: NYU Shanghai Community
From:
  • Public Safety

Dear colleagues and students,

This is a quick update. The University has submitted an application to host the on-campus vaccination for the second shot of the COVID-19 vaccine on Thursday May 6, and Friday May 7. Although the application is still under review, we want to share this in case you are making travel plans for the Labor Day break. We will share more information in the following days such as sign-up for a specific time slot for your shot. Please make a note of the dates and make sure that you will be at Shanghai then.

If you will not be at Shanghai at that time, you may need to get the second shot on your own at an off-campus clinic. Please let us know and we will provide resources/instructions in our next update. If you have any further questions, you are also welcome to email us at shanghai.publicsafety@nyu.edu, or call us at (86)(21)20595500.

 
Best regards,
Public Safety
 
 
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1 month 2 weeks ago
Time-Sensitive Important Message About COVID-19 Vaccines
To: NYU Shanghai Community
From:
  • Tong Shijun, Chancellor
  • Jeffrey S. Lehman, Vice Chancellor
  • Joanna Waley-Cohen, Provost
Relevance: Students, Faculty, and Staff
Dear Members of the NYU Shanghai Community:
 
We have a special opportunity.
 
The Pudong Health authorities and the Shanghai Municipal Education Commission have advised us that all members of the NYU Shanghai community – students (both NYU Shanghai portal campus students and Go Local students), faculty, and staff – regardless of nationality, up to age 75, may receive COVID-19 vaccinations during the month of April. 
 
The vaccinations will make use of one of the “inactivated virus” vaccines that have received emergency use authorization from China’s National Medical Products Administration. They will require two injections, three weeks apart. The first injection will be provided before April 9, the second before the end of April.
 
Vaccinations will be provided at no charge to mainland Chinese citizens with citizen ID cards. Community members who are not mainland citizens will have to pay 100 RMB out of pocket for each injection, but those payments are reimbursable under NYU Shanghai’s insurance plans.
 
We are exploring whether it might be possible to have the injections given on campus.  If not,  they will be provided at hospitals designated for our community, and NYU Shanghai will centrally coordinate the scheduling and transportation process.
 
Vaccination is not obligatory. Those who choose to receive it will be required to complete appropriate “informed consent” documentation (confirming that their decision to be vaccinated is informed, voluntary, and at their own risk) before they may receive an injection.
 
At the same time, there may be benefits to being vaccinated beyond protecting your health (and the health of others). Travel restrictions, both domestic and international, may be less burdensome for vaccinated individuals. And it is likely that hotels and airlines within China will also favor those travelers with proof of vaccination.  
 
This may be the only opportunity we will have to provide vaccinations through NYU Shanghai. Accordingly, all three of us intend to participate.
 
If you are interested in receiving the COVID vaccine through NYU Shanghai, you must register before 5:00 pm on Sunday, March 28. The registration process for mainland Chinese citizens and for holders of other passports are different. Please use whichever of the links below is appropriate for you: 
 
 
 
Students who have additional questions, please contact the Student Health Center at shanghai.health@nyu.edu.
 
Staff or faculty who have additional questions, please contact Human Resources at shanghai.hr@nyu.edu and Public Safety at shanghai.publicsafety@nyu.edu or 021-2059 5500. 
 
We Are Shanghai!
 
P.S., Some of you have asked whether there are any updates on when the Fosun-BIONTech mRNA vaccine will be approved in China. We do not have any updates at this time.
 
P.P.S., Some of you have asked whether receiving the Chinese vaccine will make it more difficult to receive a visa to enter the United States once the borders reopen. The American consulate in Shanghai is not able to provide any recommendations concerning vaccines that have not been submitted to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for approval. At this time, however, the consulate does not believe that receiving a non-approved vaccine will hurt one’s chances of obtaining a visa.
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1 month 2 weeks ago
Time-Sensitive Important Message About COVID-19 Vaccines
To: NYU Shanghai Community
From:
  • Tong Shijun, Chancellor
  • Jeffrey S. Lehman, Vice Chancellor
  • Joanna Waley-Cohen, Provost
Relevance: Students, Faculty, and Staff
Dear Members of the NYU Shanghai Community:
 
We have a special opportunity.
 
The Pudong Health authorities and the Shanghai Municipal Education Commission have advised us that all members of the NYU Shanghai community – students (both NYU Shanghai portal campus students and Go Local students), faculty, and staff – regardless of nationality, up to age 75, may receive COVID-19 vaccinations during the month of April. 
 
The vaccinations will make use of one of the “inactivated virus” vaccines that have received emergency use authorization from China’s National Medical Products Administration. They will require two injections, three weeks apart. The first injection will be provided before April 9, the second before the end of April.
 
Vaccinations will be provided at no charge to mainland Chinese citizens with citizen ID cards. Community members who are not mainland citizens will have to pay 100 RMB out of pocket for each injection, but those payments are reimbursable under NYU Shanghai’s insurance plans.
 
We are exploring whether it might be possible to have the injections given on campus.  If not,  they will be provided at hospitals designated for our community, and NYU Shanghai will centrally coordinate the scheduling and transportation process.
 
Vaccination is not obligatory. Those who choose to receive it will be required to complete appropriate “informed consent” documentation (confirming that their decision to be vaccinated is informed, voluntary, and at their own risk) before they may receive an injection.
 
At the same time, there may be benefits to being vaccinated beyond protecting your health (and the health of others). Travel restrictions, both domestic and international, may be less burdensome for vaccinated individuals. And it is likely that hotels and airlines within China will also favor those travelers with proof of vaccination.  
 
This may be the only opportunity we will have to provide vaccinations through NYU Shanghai. Accordingly, all three of us intend to participate.
 
If you are interested in receiving the COVID vaccine through NYU Shanghai, you must register before 5:00 pm on Sunday, March 28. The registration process for mainland Chinese citizens and for holders of other passports are different. Please use whichever of the links below is appropriate for you: 
 
 
 
Students who have additional questions, please contact the Student Health Center at shanghai.health@nyu.edu.
 
Staff or faculty who have additional questions, please contact Human Resources at shanghai.hr@nyu.edu and Public Safety at shanghai.publicsafety@nyu.edu or 021-2059 5500. 
 
We Are Shanghai!
 
P.S., Some of you have asked whether there are any updates on when the Fosun-BIONTech mRNA vaccine will be approved in China. We do not have any updates at this time.
 
P.P.S., Some of you have asked whether receiving the Chinese vaccine will make it more difficult to receive a visa to enter the United States once the borders reopen. The American consulate in Shanghai is not able to provide any recommendations concerning vaccines that have not been submitted to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for approval. At this time, however, the consulate does not believe that receiving a non-approved vaccine will hurt one’s chances of obtaining a visa.
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2 months 1 week ago
Updates to the Community
To: NYU Shanghai Community
From:
  • Tong Shijun, Chancellor
  • Jeffrey S. Lehman, Vice Chancellor
  • Joanna Waley-Cohen, Provost
Relevance: Students, Faculty, and Staff

Dear NYU Shanghai Students,

As we approach the middle of the spring semester, we would like to share some updates concerning the remainder of this semester and our planning for the fall.

The Spring Festival holiday season is now behind us, and (no doubt in part because fewer people traveled this year) no resurgence of coronavirus took place in China. As a result, and with the support of the Shanghai government authorities, we are able to make two important adjustments to our protocols for the rest of the semester.

First, effective immediately, the wearing of masks in public spaces in our campus buildings (including classrooms) is now optional although still strongly recommended. You should keep a spare mask with you at all times and wear it if you do not feel well. We will continue to follow our other pandemic protocols concerning entry into the buildings (green codes, temperature, restriction to community members, etc.), fever symptoms, and travel. Concerns and questions related to any of our COVID-19 Protocols can be directed to shanghai.dos@nyu.edu or shanghai.publicsafety@nyu.edu.

Second, we are able to announce that the Class of 2021 undergraduate graduation ceremony will be held in mixed mode at the Oriental Arts Center on May 25.  Live attendance will be limited to graduating students from the class of 2021 (including Go Local graduating students), students who graduated as members of the Class of 2020, faculty, and staff. Graduating students who are outside Shanghai will participate remotely, and friends and family will be able to watch online. Separate graduation events will be held for graduate students who can expect to hear from OGAE with further details.

As we look ahead to the summer and fall, we find ourselves in a position of sufficient uncertainty that each and every one of us will need to plan for two different scenarios:  a “mobility scenario” and a “non-mobility scenario.”

On the one hand, the distribution of safe and effective vaccines has now begun. Once they are widely distributed, population immunity (often called “herd immunity”) could prevent the kind of dangerous community spread that we continue to experience in many parts of the world today. 

On the other hand, new variants of the coronavirus have emerged that appear to be more infectious and more dangerous. It is not yet clear whether some of these variants might also include mutations that allow them to escape the immunity offered by today’s vaccines.

Scientists and diplomats from around the world are working together to analyze the interaction between these two opposing forces. They share the hope that the situation will progress enough between now and the summer so that university students will once again be able to travel to study in other countries without creating intolerable public health risks for themselves and others. But they are not yet fully confident that this hope will materialize.

As of today, our best assessment is that the more likely scenario for travel is the “mobility scenario.” All countries are working to put the necessary immigration and public health systems in place to enable students and workers to cross borders and complete quarantine in time for the start of fall classes, if it is determined that such mobility is safe.  Assuming the mobility scenario comes to pass, the specifics are still very uncertain. For example, will mobility be restricted to people who have been vaccinated? Will it be restricted to students and workers, excluding family members? Will the period of mandatory quarantine be shortened? Such matters may well vary from country to country, depending on facts ranging from disease prevalence to hotel capacity. We will do our best to keep you informed as all of this becomes clearer over the next months. 

Because we believe the mobility scenario is most likely, we are asking all members of our community to develop a “Plan A” that assumes mobility is possible. That Plan should assume that we will teach the fall semester in Shanghai in person, and not in mixed mode. It should assume that NYU Shanghai students will be able to study away at some of the other locations within NYU’s global network. It should assume that NYU New York and NYU Abu Dhabi students will be able to go to their home campuses. At the same time, Plan A should not assume that it will be easy to travel at the last minute; a longer buffer period than normal may be required.

At the same time, we believe that there remains a significant risk that we will have to manage a non-mobility scenario. For that reason, we are also asking all members of our community to develop an appropriate “Plan B.” That Plan should assume that we will teach the fall semester in Shanghai in mixed mode and that faculty and students will not be able to cross borders to teach and attend classes in person. 

As a university, we will make administrative adjustments in order to accommodate both possibilities. We will ask students to share their campus and course registration preferences for each scenario. We will work to ensure that we can have the teaching and space capacity that will be necessary if we have to pivot to Plan B.  

In light of the current mobility uncertainty and associated stresses, we do recommend that international students currently in Shanghai remain in China during the summer break. This is a great opportunity to enhance your language skills and to get to know China better. If you are unsure of your summer plans, please schedule a meeting with Dean Pe (davidpe@nyu.edu). 

The pandemic has taught us all the importance of flexibility and resilience. It has also taught us to make plans that accommodate uncertainty so that we can make the best of whatever situations life presents to us. We are grateful to everyone associated with NYU Shanghai for your willingness to keep adapting, and to keep helping one another as we move forward.

We Are Shanghai!

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3 months 3 weeks ago
Updated public health requirements
To: NYU Shanghai Students
From:
  • Tong Shijun, Chancellor
  • Jeffrey S. Lehman, Vice Chancellor
  • Joanna Waley-Cohen, Provost
Relevance: Students
In preparation for the first day of classes (Monday, January 25) and in light of the 6 new locally transmitted COVID infections here in Shanghai, we are writing now with some important updates regarding our own community regulations. These updates reflect current guidance from the government authorities. We will let you know whenever we are required to modify our policies in response to changing conditions.  
 
New Requirements for Those Who Have Traveled 
 
NYU Shanghai issued updated Travel Guidelines on January 15 via email.  The complete guidelines are attached to this message.  The table below reflects further modifications to those guidelines in light of the new Shanghai cases. 

 If you traveled during the semester break, you must submit a new Health Declaration to regain your campus access.  You may do this using the NYU Shanghai Enterprise WeChat Account or webform. You must do so at least 24 hours prior to your first entry to campus.  

Recent random checks of travel history revealed multiple instances of unreported travel. Please cooperate with these requirements!  Failure to do so may result in suspension of your access to campus.
 
Travel Action/History Testing Requirement Note
People who live in a Shanghai Medium-Risk Area:
Currently, these are:
(1) Zhaotong Road Residential Neighborhood (/ South of Fuzhou Road), Huangpu District/ 黄浦区昭通路居民区(福州路以南区域)
(2) 黄浦区广东路339号 上海中福世福汇大酒店/ Salvo Hotel Shanghai, No. 339 Guangdong Road, Huangpu District
If you live in these specific residential compounds or hotel, you will not be able to enter the campus facilities until further notice. 
 
If you have travelled to these residential compounds or hotel in the past 14-days, you must isolate yourself from NYU Shanghai and take a nucleic acid test before entering campus again. 
 
For either situation, please let our Public Safety (shanghai.publicsafety@nyu.edu) know immediately.
 
People who have left Shanghai (or your current city) and then returned. You must take a Nucleic Acid Test and submit the negative results to our Public Safety through NYU Shanghai Health Declaration within 3 days after taking the test A national guideline has been issued of having taken a negative Nucleic Acid Test within 7 days of leaving or returning to your current location, effective from January 28 to March 8. The NYU Shanghai standard (3 days) is more stringent.
People who have traveled to a low-risk area in a low-risk city, but then within 14 days of their return to Shanghai, the area was upgraded to medium-risk or high-risk. You must notify our Public Safety (shanghai.publicsafety@nyu.edu) and stay away from campus until you have successfully completed a second nucleic acid test. You may also be required to complete additional self-monitoring.
 
Finally, please refresh your understanding of our COVID Code of Conduct. The Code describes behaviors (such as wearing a mask in the building, hand washing, and social distancing) that are known to reduce infection transmission quite effectively.  These behaviors will protect you and will also signal to other members of the community that you respect their health and safety. (In addition to what is in the Code, it is possible that NYU Shanghai will be asked to conduct random COVID tests of people in the building. If you are asked to take such a test, we would appreciate your cooperation.)
 
As a postscript to this message, we include responses to a few frequently asked questions. We are very grateful for your willingness to keep adapting to this volatile public health environment.
 
We Are Shanghai!
 
Postscript -- 
 
Why are NYU Shanghai’s COVID policies different/more restrictive than other Shanghai universities?
 
NYU Shanghai is different from other Shanghai universities in two important respects. First, all members of this community must commute to campus and have a higher frequency of interaction with the public. Second, we must align our academic calendar with the rest of the NYU Global Network, which requires us to start earlier than other Shanghai universities.
 
In formulating our policies we have taken into consideration the feedback received from the community regarding our conservative approach.  Our decisions have consistently been guided by the same principles: 1) follow the guidance of the public health authorities, and 2) ensure that we can continue and minimize the impact to our academic operations.
 
To date, there are only 6 cases in Shanghai, a city of 25 million people.  Aren’t we being too conservative?
 
Even a single case on our campus would require us to suspend all in-person activities indefinitely.   Moreover:
 
* One super spreader in Jilin infected 102 individuals
 
* The Beijing Daxing District turned from medium-risk to high-risk within 24 hours
 
* In Beijing, one case at a school caused the entire community of more than 1,000 people to be sent to centralized quarantine
 
* The number of asymptomatic cases is increasing, along with the number of new virus mutations and variants.  
 
Under these circumstances, the government authorities require us to be cautious.   
 
How worried should I be? Should I just hunker down now?
 
You do not need to hunker down. The risk of infection here in Shanghai still remains extremely low.  In light of the extra precautions we are taking, we believe our environment is quite safe.
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4 months 1 day ago
Updated Message
To: NYU Shanghai Class of 2021
From:
  • Tong Shijun, Chancellor
  • Jeffrey S. Lehman, Vice Chancellor
  • Joanna Waley-Cohen, Provost
Relevance: NYU Shanghai Students

Dear NYU Shanghai Students,

In response to our message yesterday, we received a number of inquiries about whether all of Beijing is treated as a “city” for purposes of the new Shanghai government guideline, or whether each district within Beijing is treated as its own “city” for purposes of the guideline.

NYU Shanghai has been directed by the Shanghai Municipal Education Commission to apply all relevant rules in the most conservative manner possible. Although for some purposes Beijing is treated as a “province” rather than a city, what matters more is that (i) Beijing is approximately the same size as the other cities that are treated as “cities” for purposes of the guideline, and (ii) the various health travel apps treat Beijing as a city like other cities.

Accordingly, at this time anyone traveling from within the entire Beijing municipality will need to complete the 14 days of self-monitoring and complete 2 nucleic acid tests.

View result counter: 7
4 months 2 days ago
Update Message
To: NYU Shanghai Class of 2021
From:
  • Tong Shijun, Chancellor
  • Jeffrey S. Lehman, Vice Chancellor
  • Joanna Waley-Cohen, Provost
Relevance: NYU Shanghai Students

Dear NYU Shanghai Students,

The Shanghai Government issued a new guideline this afternoon regarding individuals who return from low-risk districts that are located in cities that also include medium-risk or high-risk districts.

Under this new citywide guideline, you would need to complete 14 days of self-monitoring and two nucleic acid tests upon return to Shanghai. This supersedes the prior requirement of a 7-day self-monitoring period and one nucleic acid test.

You can review the official announcement here: 权威发布!本市公布冬春季来沪返沪人员8条防控措施. (If necessary, you can use the translate function in WeChat to convert the text to English.) The key language is in paragraph 5:

#5: 对所有来自或途经国内疫情中风险地区及其所在县(区、市)的来沪返沪人员,一律实施14天严格的社区健康管理,实行2次新冠病毒核酸检测。

For those students who are in these cities with medium-risk or high-risk districts, we now strongly encourage you to remain at home until further guidance is issued or until your city turns back to "low-risk."

However, if you still choose to return:

  • Those who are living off campus may complete their self-monitoring in their own residences but must follow all the testing requirements.
  • Those who are living on campus must stay in a hotel for the 14 days of self-monitoring as our residential facilities do not meet government requirements due to the largely communal style setup. Our intention was to place you together in the same hotel and nearby campus. However, initial feedback from the hotels is that whether or not they can accept individuals who fall under this category will not be determined until close to check-in. This may mean placement at a hotel somewhere else in the city. NYU Shanghai will bear the cost of this hotel expense.
  • You should plan to remain in Shanghai after you return.

For those in low-risk areas in China, the past 48 hours have highlighted the fact that a location can become medium-risk or high-risk in a matter of hours. We recommend that you return to Shanghai as soon as possible and not plan to leave.

It is very important that all of us at NYU Shanghai comply strictly with these guidelines. Last year our city’s careful response to the pandemic helped to protect us against significant community spread of the COVID-19 disease and enabled us to resume a fairly normal life in the city. Let us hope that this year’s actions will be equally effective.

We Are Shanghai!

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4 months 1 week ago
The New Year
To: NYU Shanghai Students
From:
  • Tong Shijun, Chancellor
  • Jeffrey S. Lehman, Vice Chancellor
  • Joanna Waley-Cohen, Provost
Relevance: Students
Dear NYU Shanghai Students,
 
Happy New Year!  At long last, 2021 has arrived. 
 
We’ll begin this message with two reasons for optimism in 2021.  First, a full two hundred NYU Shanghai international students have now successfully jumped the many hurdles to rejoin us here in Shanghai.  And second, this week we were able to give two hundred of our faculty and staff members their first of two COVID-19 vaccination shots.
 
At the same time, the globally worsening pandemic situation has created many new obstacles for our community. We would like to spend the rest of this message discussing how those obstacles are likely to affect our work during the semester that begins on January 25.
 
Here in China, there has been a recent uptick in the numbers of imported cases (including some involving the new United Kingdom strain) as well as an uptick in community-transmitted cases. Although the numbers of such cases are still only about 30 per day nationwide, the public health authorities are responding with extreme caution. Even a few cases can cause a neighborhood to be classified as “medium risk,” and a few dozen can cause a neighborhood to be classified as “high risk.”  
 
As of 6:00 pm today in China, 49 neighborhoods in five Chinese cities are classified as “medium risk” or “high risk.”  Anyone who visits such a neighborhood and then comes to Shanghai must undergo fourteen days of “health management” and have two negative COVID nucleic acid tests before returning to campus; anyone who visits a city that contains such a neighborhood and then comes to Shanghai should plan for seven days of health management and one negative COVID nucleic acid test before returning to campus.
 
China has also continued to tighten the requirements for people who wish to enter the country from overseas. Charters are still not permitted, so those who return must use commercial flights. The temporary ban on use of ordinary visas remains in place, but even people with special invitation letters such as those our international faculty and students have relied upon to enter China are now facing additional, more stringent requirements imposed by individual embassies and consulates based on their assessments of local conditions. We are trying to stay in touch with local authorities to stay informed about such local requirements (which most often concern testing). 
 
One situation that came to our attention this week concerns travelers who were infected with the COVID virus in the past but have since recovered and are no longer showing symptoms. Such travelers can obtain negative PCR and IgM tests so as to be able to fly back to China, but upon arrival may still test positive for IgG antibodies. If they do, they may then be sent to a special monitoring hospital for several days of repeated testing and observation to confirm that they are no longer infectious before they are released to a quarantine hotel. If you think you might be such a person, we encourage you to consult with our health and wellness team so that you are well prepared before you fly.
 
We recognize that many students who had planned to be here for the start of the semester will not be able to do so, and we are sorry for the frustrations that you are experiencing. If changing circumstances are causing you to need to alter your travel and academic plans, you should consult with your advisor about possible adjustments to your schedule. NYU Shanghai will continue to do its best to support your needs for remote learning as well as a transition to live learning if and when that becomes possible. If you have other concerns that you would like discuss with the university, we encourage you to reach out to Dean Pe (davidpe@nyu.edu).
 
As was true last year, the complexities of the situation will require a flexible and resilient approach to classes during the coming semester. Some students, both international and domestic, who expected to be attending class in person may have to participate remotely for part or all of the semester. That will call for patience, understanding, and generosity of spirit on the part of them, their professors, and their classmates.
 
Nonetheless, we remain optimistic that 2021 will be a year in which NYU Shanghai will steadily return to a more “normal” state than the way we felt at the end of 2020. And we remain grateful to all of you for ensuring that the unique spirit of our university endures.
 
We Are Shanghai!
View result counter: 9
5 months 1 week ago
The Home Stretch
To: NYU Shanghai Students
From:
  • Tong Shijun, Chancellor
  • Jeffrey S. Lehman, Vice Chancellor
  • Joanna Waley-Cohen, Provost
Relevance: Students
Dear NYU Shanghai Students:
 
We are now in the fall semester’s home stretch. Classes are drawing to a close, and final exams begin next week. 
 
We write to you now with a simple request. During the next three weeks, let’s all make an extra effort to help each other bring this semester to a successful conclusion. If you hear that familiar end-of-term anxiety in a classmate’s voice, give them a few words of perspective and encouragement. If you find yourself fretting over how you can possibly finish all your assignments, reach out to a friend for that same kind of support.
 
And don’t forget about our amazing Health and Wellness team. They have established a "Virtual Calm Corner" at https://sites.google.com/nyu.edu/calm-corner. Confidential support from the Wellness Exchange is available 24 hours a day at (+86) (0) 21-2059-9999 or (+1) 212-443-9999. Or you can stop by the Student Health Center on the 6th floor of the Academic Building between 8:30 am and 5:30 pm, Monday through Friday.  
 
Please also do your best to get enough food, sleep, and exercise. All those things are important to keeping your brains operating at their best.
 
Together, we can do this.
 
We Are Shanghai!
 
View result counter: 10
5 months 2 weeks ago
Update message
To: NYU Shanghai Class of 2021
From:
  • Tong Shijun, Chancellor
  • Jeffrey S. Lehman, Vice Chancellor
  • Joanna Waley-Cohen, Provost
Relevance: NYU Shanghai Students

Dear NYU Shanghai Students,

Last week we advised you that our plans for the Spring 2021 semester were being revised in two ways to take account of new restrictions on travel:

  1. the Office of Global Programs has agreed to allow freshmen and sophomore NYU Shanghai students to apply to Go Local during the Spring 2021 semester,
  2. remote or Go Local study during the Spring 2021 semester will not automatically count as a “study away” semester for any students, from any year.

At the same time, we shared a caution that, given the pandemic situation, it is not at all clear what “Going Local” outside Shanghai will mean next semester; classes on other campuses and sites may well be offered only online.

In this message, we want to add some additional information that you may find useful as you make your academic plans for 2021:

  • For the Spring 2021 semester, NYU Shanghai will be offering a mix of in-person, blended, and online courses and sections to meet the needs of students who are studying remotely. All students should work with their Academic Advisors in determining which courses, including online courses from New York and the Global Sites, are the best choices for them.
  • Graduating seniors who are unable to return to China should speak with their Academic Advisors about how to meet their graduation requirements remotely.
  • We recognize that some of you may wish to take a leave of absence next semester. If you think you might wish to follow that path, we encourage you to please reach out to your Academic Advisor so that you have all pertinent information about when courses you might need for graduation will be offered.
  • We understand that some of you would like to consider remaining here over the summer so that you do not have to fly back and forth more than necessary. We are working hard to make sure that there will be internships and research opportunities available.  (There will also of course be the usual, albeit limited, array of courses available.) All NYU Shanghai students who remain here over the summer will be able to rent a dorm room if they wish, and we are working to ensure that the room rate is discounted.
  • For students who are still struggling to secure flights, please know that some of your classmates have been successful telephoning the airlines directly; telephone agents can sometimes see seats that are not posted online.
  • We are continuing to plan some extra community activities for those who will be in Shanghai during the January term. For example, we are planning an Academic Festival to celebrate the knowledge, wisdom, and skills of our community. Students, faculty, staff, and alumni will make presentations in the Academic Building, from January 4 through 22.

Finally, on a more sobering note, the local authorities shared an anecdote about the importance of mask-wearing that we thought we should pass along. Two weeks ago, a person in Tianjin who was infected with COVID-19 got into an empty elevator while not wearing a mask. He traveled to his destination floor and left the elevator, but en route he coughed. Two minutes later, another person entered the empty elevator while not wearing a mask. He inhaled aerosol droplets that the infected person had coughed, and he became infected.

Wherever you may be in the world, we ask you to continue to exercise caution. We are hopeful that 2021 will be the year when vaccinations bring the pandemic under control, but we have not yet reached that moment.

And on this Thanksgiving holiday, we would like to convey our gratitude for each of you and your many contributions to our university community.

We Are Shanghai!

View result counter: 11
5 months 4 weeks ago
Update message
To: NYU Shanghai Class of 2021
From:
  • Tong Shijun, Chancellor
  • Jeffrey S. Lehman, Vice Chancellor
  • Joanna Waley-Cohen, Provost
Relevance: NYU Shanghai Students

Dear NYU Shanghai Students,

It has been exciting to welcome the steady flow of international students back to Shanghai.  At present 95 international students have returned successfully, and more are on the way. We admire the creativity that some of you have shown in navigating such choppy waters. And we appreciate the warmth with which our local students have welcomed their classmates into the world of quarantine.

At the same time, new restrictions on travel to China, including the suspension of charters last week, have made it much more difficult for some students to return, disrupting our plans for the rest of this semester and next.  

Concerning this semester, we have heard from some of you that the constantly shifting terrain has been extremely stressful, and that you are concerned about the impact those stresses are having on your studies. In light of that understandable fact, the faculty has determined to adjust the Pass/Fail rules for the Fall 2020 semester.

The updated rules are here. We hope that these modifications will help to assuage some of your immediate anxieties.  Moreover, we want to remind everyone that our trained health and wellness professionals are available to speak with you. You may reach them by email at shanghai.health@nyu.edu or by telephone 24 hours a day at (+86) (0) 21-2059-9999 or (+1) 212-443-9999 or at other numbers around the world here.

As for next semester, we are still working through the many interrelated changes that will take place, but we can share right now that (1) the Office of Global Programs has agreed to allow freshmen and sophomore NYU Shanghai students to apply to Go Local during the Spring 2021 semester, and (2) remote or Go Local study during the Spring 2021 semester will not count as a “study away” semester. At the same time, the Offices of Global Programs has cautioned that, given the pandemic situation, it is not at all clear what “Going Local” outside Shanghai will mean next semester; it would not be surprising if all classes on other campuses were to be offered only online. If you are interested in Going Local and have not already applied, you should do so as soon as possible.

Next week the advising team will host a webinar to provide an overview of how the spring schedule will work. After attending that webinar you should schedule an individual meeting with your advisor to discuss questions specific to your circumstances and academic progress needs.

We Are Shanghai!

View result counter: 12
6 months 5 days ago
Update message
To: NYU Shanghai Class of 2021
From:
  • Tong Shijun, Chancellor
  • Jeffrey S. Lehman, Vice Chancellor
  • Joanna Waley-Cohen, Provost
Relevance: NYU Shanghai Students

Dear Students,

This message brings disappointing news.

Today was our internal deadline to move forward with planning for the charter flight for next week from JFK. We were optimistic that we would get the necessary approvals, but we were advised this evening that China has just suspended all international charter flights into the country pending further notice. The surge in cases around the world (in particular the US where there have been more than 100,000 new cases each day for six consecutive days), as well as the identification of a new case in Shanghai (for the first time in five months) has resulted in the redoubling of caution.

In these circumstances, we will now move in the following direction in our planning:

We will continue to plan for a charter to bring students back from the USA. We believe that the suspension could be lifted any time between the end of this month and the beginning of January. We may not be given more than one week’s notice before the flight; we will let you know as soon as we can, so that you have as much time as possible to sign up and prepare to travel. In light of today's information, we should not assume that more than one charter will be authorized.

  • We will welcome students back at any time (previously we had asked that students choose either to return before November 15 or else in January).
  • If you are planning to return for Spring semester and have not yet applied for your visa, please do so ASAP. Different consulates have different requirements, and some have indicated that it will take two weeks or more to process applications.
  • If you are in a country where visas and commercial flights have not been suspended, we encourage you to continue to explore commercial options. China Eastern has not yet released their seats for the month of December, but we have asked that they prioritize NYU Shanghai for commercial seats that become available. We understand that Delta, United, and American have direct flights but that their prices remain high. If you believe you will be facing a new financial hardship during the spring semester, please submit a “Spring appeal” by November 29, using the following link:  https://www.nyu.edu/admissions/financial-aid-and-scholarships/managing-your-aid/adjusting-your-aid/scholarship-appeal-for-returning-undergraduates.html
  • If you are in a country where visas and commercial flights have been suspended, we understand that your options are limited and that you are now concerned about whether you will be able to return for next semester. We are continuing to monitor the situation; if it does not change by November 30, we will provide you with a full list of options to consider as you prepare for course registration on December 7.

If you have already returned to Shanghai and are experiencing financial hardship, please contact Dean Pe.

We are very disappointed to be sharing this news with you, and we know that you must be disappointed to receive it. Ever since we were approved to bring our international students back last month, we have been looking forward to your arrival.

We deeply appreciate your continued resilience during this challenging year, and we will continue to adapt and work to reunite our community as soon as possible.

We Are Shanghai!

View result counter: 13
7 months 1 week ago
Spring 2021
To: NYU Shanghai Class of 2021
From:
  • Tong Shijun, Chancellor
  • Jeffrey S. Lehman, Vice Chancellor
  • Joanna Waley-Cohen, Provost
Relevance: NYU Shanghai Students

Dear Students:

You have recently received a message from NYU’s Office of Global Programs concerning NYU’s plans for the Spring 2021 semester. As you will have seen, global pandemic conditions have led the university to conclude that (a) it will not be able to provide students with traditional “study away” opportunities, but (b) it will continue to offer “Go Local” options to students who are still not able to return to their home campus.

We have received some questions about what the message means for NYU Shanghai, and we would like to provide a few points of clarification:

  1. Students whose home campus is NYU Shanghai are now able to return to Shanghai and take classes in person. Although the Go Local program is therefore not designed for our students, NYU has agreed that, if an NYU Shanghai student wants to use up one of their study away semesters for that purpose, they may apply for permission to spend spring semester at a Go Local site provided the Office of Global Programs concludes that they meet the other Go Local eligibility requirements.
  2. NYU Shanghai will continue to provide the same Go Local visiting experience next semester to students from NYU New York and NYU Abu Dhabi that it is providing this semester.  As is the case this semester, up to 2,300 undergraduate Go Local visitors will be able to take classes in the Shinmay Building, and up to 700 graduate Go Local visitors will be able to take classes in the Fuhui Building.  As is the case this semester, students will not be able to be Go Local visitors in Shanghai unless they are taking at least one class in person.  In admitting students to be Go Local visitors next semester, priority will be given to students who are already Go Local visitors this semester.
  3. NYU Shanghai will continue to operate all three of our classroom buildings (the Academic Building, the Shinmay Building, and the Fuhui Building) in strict compliance with all public health and safety codes, with careful headcounts at all time to ensure that we are not overly crowded.
  4. NYU Shanghai will continue to operate so as to provide all our students – students who will receive NYU Shanghai degrees and students who are Go Local visitors to NYU Shanghai from other campuses – with the best university experience we can under these very challenging circumstances. Some NYU Shanghai matriculants have asked whether we can increase the amount of study space in the Academic Building, and we are now working to convert the fifteenth floor to that purpose within the next two weeks.

We hope this information provides some additional clarity to the message you received from the Office of Global Programs.

We continue to appreciate everyone’s flexibility and adaptability as we continue to accommodate our university to these unprecedented times.

We Are Shanghai!

View result counter: 14
7 months 1 week ago
Good news
To: Members of the NYU Shanghai Community
From:
  • Tong Shijun, Chancellor
  • Jeffrey S. Lehman, Vice Chancellor
  • Joanna Waley-Cohen, Provost
Relevance: NYU Shanghai Community

We write now to share some good news.

We have now learned that the approval process has been completed with regard to visa issuances for international students. Thanks to truly extraordinary efforts by the governments of the Pudong District and Shanghai City, as well as the Ministry of Education and the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, NYU Shanghai has been given an “exemption” from the prevailing freeze on the issuance of student visas, so that we may bring our international students to China.

We are especially happy to note that this exemption applies to both students in Group 1B and students in Group 2. There will not be any gap between the transition of entering first-year students to Shanghai and the return of upper-year students.

Now that it has been granted, this exemption must be implemented through a set of procedures that begin with the issuance of Invitation Letters. These procedures will be set in motion by the authorities at the Shanghai Foreign Affairs Office once they return from their National Day and Mid-Autumn break, which lasts through October 8. Each of the hundreds of invitation letters must be produced individually in accordance with an exacting process. We expect all the invitation letters to be issued during the week of October 12. We appreciate your continued patience and understanding while these procedures are completed.

This Friday, October 9th, Dean Pe will be sending our returning international students a full set of instructions on the steps that must be taken to transform Invitation Letters into new visas as smoothly as possible. Even before receiving Dean Pe’s instructions, returning students can begin to prepare in the following ways:

  1. Identify the location of the Chinese embassy or consulate within your geographical jurisdiction;
  2. Visit your embassy or consulate’s website and review the requirements for submitting an application for the issuance of a visa;
  3. Identify possible COVID-19 Nucleic Acid Testing facilities near you that have the capacity to administer a test and provide results within a short window (we expect that you will need to have taken a nucleic acid test within 72 hours before you board your flight and to have had the negative results of that test certified by your embassy or consulate); and
  4. Explore flight options and possible dates of travel.

By doing this preparatory work, students can help to ensure that their entry into China proceeds in as orderly a manner as possible. (Please note that it is still premature to focus on the topics of quarantine and university housing; those matters can be addressed once a visa is secured.) If you have immediate questions, you can email Dean Pe at davidpe@nyu.edu.

We Are Shanghai!

View result counter: 15
8 months 3 weeks ago
Fall semester update
To: NYU Shanghai Students
From:
  • Tong Shijun, Chancellor
  • Jeffrey S. Lehman, Vice Chancellor
  • Joanna Waley-Cohen, Provost
Relevance: NYU Shanghai Students

Dear NYU Shanghai Sophomores, Juniors, and Seniors,

Last month we asked you to choose among four options for this coming semester, and many of you selected “Option B” – returning to Shanghai as soon as possible. We are now less than three weeks from the first day of classes, and we would like in this message to update you on our efforts to bring you back to Shanghai and on how we see the semester beginning.

In last month's message, we explained that the regulatory authorities were not able to issue invitation letters to all members of our international community in a single group, and that international sophomores, juniors, and seniors would be members of “Group 2.” Subsequently, Group 1 was subdivided into Group 1A (overseas employees) and Group 1B (overseas first-year students).

In our more recent message from two weeks ago, we explained that invitation letters to Group 1A had been issued. Most of the recipients of those letters now have turned them into emergency visas and will be returning to Shanghai over the course of the next week.

Unfortunately, public health concerns have meant further delays in the issuance of invitation letters to students who are outside China. The COVID-19 outbreaks that required the University of North Carolina, North Carolina State University, and the University of Notre Dame to re-close have heightened concerns at the national level here in China about the risk that university students from overseas might be vectors for spikes of reinfection.

The city of Shanghai has assured the national regulators in Beijing that our international students will comply fully with all public health requirements. We are in contact with our counterparts every day and remain hopeful that invitation letters will be authorized very soon. Unfortunately, we still do not have a timeline for authorization of letters to Group 1B and Group 2, and nothing can happen until they are produced.

The very disappointing fact is this:  Even if all the invitation letters were produced today, it would not be possible for those of you who selected Option B to secure visas in time to enter the country and complete quarantine before the start of classes on September 14.

This is not what we wanted. As all of you are well aware, NYU Shanghai’s special “double identity” is built upon a vision of students interacting every day with classmates from other cultures. It is deeply frustrating to remain in limbo as we struggle to restore that experience to our school.

Many of you have asked us to keep you informed of what we are learning about the flight possibilities that might exist once invitation letters are issued.  In our last message we described our efforts to charter a flight from the United States. The delay in invitation letters, the complexities of securing authorization from regulatory authorities in two countries, and the recent increase in the number of regularly scheduled commercial flights to China, have led us to move away from the charter plan. We are instead working with the airlines to explore the possibility of obtaining discounts on certain regularly scheduled flights from different cities if there is a sufficiently sized group of passengers affiliated with NYU Shanghai. We will provide more details on such options once we are given a definitive timeline for the issuance of invitation letters.

If you have changes to your Fall semester plans, please continue to work directly with your academic advisor to discuss your options.

Once again, we thank you for your patience and flexibility as we navigate these challenging and unprecedented times together. This continuously evolving environment has summoned us all to respond with creativity and resilience. We consider ourselves fortunate to be part of such a remarkable community, one that is fully committed to a set of values that are even more important today than ever before.

We Are Shanghai!

View result counter: 16
8 months 3 weeks ago
Fall semester update
To: NYU Shanghai Students
From:
  • Tong Shijun, Chancellor
  • Jeffrey S. Lehman, Vice Chancellor
  • Joanna Waley-Cohen, Provost
Relevance: NYU Shanghai Class of 2024

Dear NYU Shanghai Entering First-Year Students,

We are now less than three weeks from the first day of classes for the fall semester. In this message we would like to update you on our efforts to bring you to Shanghai and on how we see the semester beginning.

As we noted in our last message, letters of invitation were issued to our faculty and staff several weeks ago. Most of the recipients of those letters now have turned those letters into emergency visas and will be returning to Shanghai over the course of the next week.

Unfortunately, public health concerns have meant further delays in the issuance of invitation letters to students who are outside China. The COVID-19 outbreaks that required the University of North Carolina, North Carolina State University, and the University of Notre Dame to re-close have heightened concerns at the national level here in China about the risk that university students from overseas might be vectors for spikes of reinfection.
The city of Shanghai has assured the national regulators in Beijing that our international students will comply fully with all public health requirements. We are in contact with our counterparts every day and remain hopeful that invitation letters will be authorized very soon. Unfortunately, we still do not have a timeline for authorization, and nothing can happen until the letters are produced.

The very disappointing fact is this:  Even if the invitation letters were produced today, it would no longer be possible for those of you who are outside China to secure visas in time to enter the country and complete quarantine before the start of classes on September 14.

This is not what we wanted. NYU Shanghai’s special “double identity” is built upon a vision of students interacting every day with roommates and classmates from other cultures. We postponed the start of the semester until September 14 in the expectation that we would be able to continue to fulfill that vision together live, in person, from the very first day of classes.

Now, due to factors beyond our control, we must pivot and make the best we can of the current situation. To help us do so, we are now asking all of you who are outside China to select one of the following two options, so that we can proceed to register you in classes that are appropriate to your particular situation:

  • The Transition Option. If you select this option, you will begin the semester with remote classes and will rejoin live classes in Shanghai as soon as possible. You should register only for NYU Shanghai courses and take them remotely for the time being. Please note that if you select this option, your classes will be on “China time,” which may be inconvenient until you get here, and for the first two weeks after you arrive in China you will be taking classes remotely from quarantine. When you finally arrive on campus, your professors will work with you to ensure a smooth transition to live classes.
  • The Remote Semester Option. If you select this option, you will take all your fall classes remotely for the entire semester. Your classes will combine asynchronous and synchronous instruction, and you will receive academic support tailored to your personal circumstances. Special sections of three mandatory NYU Shanghai classes for first-year students (Global Perspectives on Society, Chinese language, and mathematics) will be scheduled at times appropriate to students in other time zones. "For your fourth class, you may register for NYU Shanghai courses with seats reserved for first-year students but they will run at their scheduled times in Shanghai. You may also seek to register for any open class offered by the NYU global network for which you meet the prerequisites." In the Spring, we will work to ensure a smooth transitiion to live classes in Shanghai.

In order for us to schedule classes and sections appropriately, we ask you to let us know which option you will pursue by August 30 via this link:*/  https://forms.gle/wfsij8RdcQHE4urq8.  We apologize that we need your response so quickly, but we require this information in order to do the proper scheduling.

Finally, in our last message we described our efforts to charter a flight from the United States. The delay in invitation letters, the complexities of securing authorization from regulatory authorities in two countries, and the recent increase in the number of regularly scheduled commercial flights to China, have led us to move away from the charter plan. We are instead working with the airlines to explore the possibility of obtaining discounts on certain regularly scheduled flights from different cities if there is a sufficiently sized group of passengers affiliated with NYU Shanghai. We will provide more details on such options once we are given a definitive timeline for the issuance of invitation letters.

You are likely to have many new questions about the evolving situation, and we encourage you to look at the following two “Frequently Asked Questions” documents:

Once again, we thank you for your patience and flexibility as we navigate these challenging and unprecedented times together. This continuously evolving environment has summoned us all to respond with creativity and resilience. We consider ourselves fortunate to be part of such a remarkable community, one that is fully committed to a set of values that are even more important today than ever before.

We Are Shanghai!

*/  If, instead of choosing one of these options, you would rather postpone your studies for a year and join the Class of 2025, please contact shanghai.admissions@nyu.edu.

View result counter: 17
9 months 1 day ago
Update Concerning Fall 2020 Semester
To: NYU Shanghai Students
From:
  • Tong Shijun, Chancellor
  • Jeffrey S. Lehman, Vice Chancellor
  • Joanna Waley-Cohen, Provost
Relevance: NYU Shanghai Students

Dear NYU Shanghai Students,

The new semester will be beginning in only one month, and we are working hard to get ready.  The situation around us keeps shifting on a daily basis, and the next few weeks will be challenging and unpredictable for us all. We truly appreciate everyone’s resilience and understanding as we move forward.

In this message we will focus on the current state of our efforts to bring overseas members of our community into Shanghai. The limitations on global mobility have not relaxed as quickly as we hoped they might at the beginning of the summer, and we want to bring you up to date on how we have been working to adapt.

Background on Foreign Citizens’ Entry Into China

As background, on March 28, foreign citizens were temporarily banned from entering China without exceptional permission. To receive such permission, one needed to follow a process whereby a number of different divisions of the local and national governments, each having its own domain of special concern, can have input. The domains range from disease and pandemic control to foreign affairs to education to municipal resource management. Following this process, someone seeking to come to China must first receive an “invitation letter” (also known as a “PU”) from the government.  They then must work with a consulate to secure a visa, arrange transportation, often with evidence of a negative COVID test result within a few day of departure, and prepare for two weeks of quarantine upon arrival.

From the end of March until the end of July, invitation letters were extremely difficult to secure, as the country sought to manage the risk that people would bring coronavirus infection with them into the country. During that period, the city of Shanghai was able to issue an average of only 100 invitation letters per week. 

August Developments – Invitation Letters and Visas

Last week, the authorities concluded that the situation had stabilized to the point that that Shanghai was able to issue 700 new invitation letters. We were deeply gratified that the city allocated one third of those letters to NYU Shanghai, for use by the group of faculty and staff we have been referring to as Group 1A. We were told that the city places a high value on our unique university and is doing all it can to help us reopen on time this fall.At the same time, the national authorities determined that citizens of Korea who are in Korea no longer need invitation letters. They may proceed directly to securing a visa. The national authorities also moved to speed up processing of visas for holders of European passports, although they continue to need invitation letters.

The next step is for the city to issue invitation letters to Group 1B, our entering international first-year students and graduate students, who are citizens of countries other than South Korea. We had hoped that this might happen this week, but that hope was stymied when last week’s international flights to Shanghai included 18 coronavirus-infected passengers.

The city’s officials have reaffirmed that they understand the importance of bringing our international students to campus, and they know that classes will begin on September 14. We hope that the next round of invitation letters will be produced next week, but at this time we cannot know for sure whether they will. And we hope that the invitation letters for Group 2 will be issued as soon after the invitation letters for Group 1B as possible.Once the invitation letters are issued, the next step is for the recipients to submit them along with a visa application form to their local consulates. The materials that are required by the consulates vary from country to country. At a minimum you will need to submit the attached visa application and health declaration form; you can begin to prepare these two documents. Other documents will be communicated by either the consulate directly or by instructions from NYU Shanghai once we secure the invitation letters.

August Developments – Transportation

The next step is transportation. Once again, we had hoped that by the end of the summer it would have been possible for the supply of seats on airplanes into China to have returned to parity with the demand for such seats. That has not yet happened, and seats are expensive. In some locations purchasing a ticket requires evidence of holding a current visa. 

Because we have a large number of students in the United States, we have been working to arrange a charter flight from there. In particular, we are working with Delta Airlines to see whether we can have a Delta charter fly from Detroit Metro Airport to Shanghai.

As with the issuance of letters of invitation, several different government authorities must grant their consent to enable such a charter to fly. In addition, the charter must operate in compliance with United States laws in order to depart from the United States. We are working hard to secure all the necessary permissions and to make sure that we are in full compliance with all applicable laws, but we are not yet at the point where the flight is authorized to go.

Because the processes of securing approvals for both invitation letters and flights have not been completed, the date we are discussing with Delta has now been moved back to Friday, September 4. The process of testing within a few days before travel and quarantine upon arrival remains in place.

ConclusionWe recognize that it is extremely frustrating to have to operate under circumstances where one cannot make definitive plans, even for international travel within the next few weeks.  We truly wish things could be otherwise.Under these circumstances, we urge you to be prepared to move quickly once the regulatory authorities act:  to proceed quickly with a visa application once the invitation letter is issued, and then to proceed quickly with flight arrangements once your visa is in hand. 

At the same time, we also advise you to be prepared for the continuing possibility of delays. The Shanghai authorities are not able to provide us with a timeline for action; all they can do is what they are doing – assure us that they will do all they can to help us resume university life in Shanghai, consistent with their overarching public health responsibilities.

If you have questions specific to your unique circumstances, please do not hesitate to present them to your academic advisor (shanghai.advising@nyu.edu) or student life (shanghai.studentlife@nyu.edu) for undergraduates and to OGAE (shanghai.ogae@nyu.edu) for graduate students.  If you have questions that you think might be of general interest to the student community, please do not hesitate to convey them to the President of Student Government, Taylah Bland, at tlb394@nyu.edu. We have weekly meetings with Taylah during which we do our best to answer all the questions that she has accumulated.

Please continue to be strong and resilient as we navigate the most challenging part of our path to the fall semester. 

We Are Shanghai!

View result counter: 18
9 months 1 week ago
Update concerning return to Shanghai
To: Members of the NYU Shanghai Community
From:
  • Tong Shijun, Chancellor
  • Jeffrey S. Lehman, Vice Chancellor
  • Joanna Waley-Cohen, Provost
Relevance: All NYU Shanghai Students, Faculty, and Staff

Dear International Members of the Undergraduate Class of 2024 and International Graduate Students,


As you are aware, almost all of you require special letters of invitation (“LOIs”) from the government in order to get the visas you will need to enter China for class this semester.* The most important steps that you will need to follow are: (1) receive LOI from the Shanghai Foreign Affairs Office, (2) obtain visa from the embassy or consulate in the country where you are now, (3) obtain a negative nucleic acid COVID-19 test result, (4) fly to Shanghai, (5) complete 14-day quarantine in Shanghai.

We had hoped that by now we would be able to provide you with a definitive schedule for when you would receive your LOIs. Unfortunately, the continuously changing circumstances in which we are operating has meant that we are not able to do so.

To bring you up to date, the government asked us to divide our first group of LOI recipients into two smaller subgroups, which we are calling Group 1A and Group 1B.  Group 1A comprises 235 people and includes all NYU Shanghai international faculty and staff currently outside China.  Group 1B comprises all of you, the international members of the undergraduate Class of 2024 and the international graduate students.

The government has now issued the LOIs to all members of Group 1A.  They understand the importance of issuing LOIs to the members of Group 1B in time for you to complete the remaining steps, enter China by September 1, complete quarantine, and begin classes on September 14. Unfortunately, they are not yet able to provide us with a definitive date on which the LOIs for Group 1B will be issued.

We are sorry for the delays, but we remain confident that the LOIs will be issued to you in time.  We will provide you with a further update early next week, and we very much appreciate your understanding.

* On Monday August 3rd, the Ministry of Foreign Affairs announced that South Korean passport holders have resumed the normal entry process when entering between China and Korea. These students have been contacted by the Student Mobility office about proceeding with the remaining steps in the process.

View result counter: 19
9 months 3 weeks ago
Returning to Shanghai
To: NYU Shanghai Students
From:
  • Tong Shijun, Chancellor
  • Jeffrey S. Lehman, Vice Chancellor
  • Joanna Waley-Cohen, Provost
Relevance: Students

Dear NYU Shanghai Sophomores, Juniors, and Seniors,

Some of you have shared with us a video of a presentation given by an NYU Shanghai official to admitted Chinese first-year students in Chengdu. While attempting to reassure his audience that they would have international classmates this fall, our Director of Chinese Admissions made several comments that were not accurate.

As we indicated in our message last week, the government has advised us that we may not bring all our international students back in a single group. The first group will consist of first-year students who have not previously studied in Shanghai. The second group will consist of all upper-year students who have expressed a wish to return to Shanghai this fall. Contrary to what is stated in the video, we are working hard to bring this second group back.

To be specific, 251 upper-year international students indicated a preference to return in their response to the survey. The student mobility team is already working on pulling together all their travel information so that we can submit it as soon as the authorities are prepared to accept it. Once we have a sense of when the first group of students will be arriving, we will ask the government to treat all 251 students as a single group and to invite this group to return as soon after the first group as possible.

We will be updating the community as soon as we have additional information from our government partners.

View result counter: 20
9 months 3 weeks ago
Update Concerning Fall 2020 Semester
To: NYU Shanghai Students
From:
  • Tong Shijun, Chancellor
  • Jeffrey S. Lehman, Vice Chancellor
  • Joanna Waley-Cohen, Provost
Relevance: Students

Dear NYU Shanghai Undergraduate Students:

We are writing as promised to update you on what the evolving pandemic situation and restrictions on international travel will mean for NYU Shanghai students during the fall semester.

The past few weeks have seen a worsening of the pandemic in some countries, even as it has remained stable and improved in others. As a result, almost all countries are maintaining severe restrictions on international travel. Here in China, the flare-up of cases last month in Beijing was successfully controlled, and Shanghai has remained a city without any significant community spread of infection.

Accordingly, classes in the Academic Building will resume on September 14. We expect all students who are currently in China to be able to attend those classes in person, even as we continue to operate under the system of “responsible reopening” that has been in place since April.[*]

The Chinese border has been closed, with very few exceptions, to all foreign travelers since March 28. At this time anyone who wishes to enter China must be sponsored by an institution that can apply for a special letter of invitation on their behalf. NYU Shanghai is such an institution, and we expect to obtain such letters for our students and faculty. However, in order to minimize the epidemiological risks associated with people returning from abroad, the authorities are authorizing communities to return in groups, not all at the same time.

As of today, it appears that the first group of people who will be able to return to China (or come to China for the first time) will include our first-year international students. NYU Shanghai’s pedagogic philosophy emphasizes the opportunity for Chinese and international students to have intense multicultural interactions, both inside and outside the classroom – this is especially critical in the first year, when class spirit and bonds are forged in the dormitories and in core classes taken by all first-year students.  First-year international students should all be able to enter the country and complete quarantine in time for the beginning of classes, so long as they have provided us with the details from a valid passport.

More specifically:

  • If you are an entering first-year student who is currently outside China and you have provided us with the relevant documentation, we will provide you with additional information next week about how the process for your entry into China is unfolding, including the process for securing a visa and how best to obtain transportation to Shanghai.
  • If you are an entering first-year student who is currently outside China and you have not provided us with the relevant documentation but you can do so, please send that information to shanghai.student-mobility@nyu.edu by Monday, July 20.
  • If you are an entering first-year student who is currently outside China, you have not provided us with the relevant documentation, and you are unable to do so at this time, you may take your NYU Shanghai classes remotely. The classes will combine asynchronous and synchronous instruction, and all students will receive academic support tailored to their personal circumstances.

We regret that sophomores, juniors, and seniors who are currently outside China and wish to return will not be included in the first group of returning students. While we are making every effort to ensure their timely return, we cannot say with confidence that they will be able to enter the country and complete quarantine in time for the beginning of classes. We do expect that they will be able to enter the country and complete quarantine during the semester, but are unable at this point to say precisely when.

Accordingly, if you are now outside China and were hoping to return,[†] and you are not an entering first-year student, you will need to select among four options:

  • Option A. You may take classes remotely for the entire semester. The classes will combine asynchronous and synchronous instruction, and all students will receive academic support tailored to their personal circumstances. You may seek to register in any open class in the New York University network for which you meet the prerequisites.
  • Option B. You may affirm your interest in returning to Shanghai as soon as possible. If you pursue this option you should register primarily for courses offered from Shanghai and take them remotely for the time being, so that your schedule will not need to be adjusted when you return to Shanghai.
  • Option C. If you are lawfully able to live and study in an NYU “Go Local” site without need for a student visa, you may indicate your interest with the Office of Global Programs through this website:  https://www.nyu.edu/academics/studying-abroad/go-local.html. Pursuing such an opportunity will not count as a “Study Away” semester. If you wish to pursue this option, you should submit your interest form before July 20. After submitting your form, you will receive further communication from the Office of Global Programs. This option commits you to staying at the Go Local location for the full semester and precludes you from returning to China part-way through the semester. Please note that you may still need to take some of your courses remotely, as most Go Local locations will be offering only a limited number of in-person courses.
  • Option D. If none of the first three Options work for you, the usual policy on taking a Leave of Absence (“LoA”) remains available. See https://shanghai.nyu.edu/academics/tuition/international/refunds-and-withdrawals. Because taking an LoA would delay your graduation, you should speak with your academic advisor before requesting such a leave.

We appreciate that this information is likely to raise many additional questions, depending on your particular situation. We have prepared several “Frequently Asked Questions” documents to provide you with assistance.  For all academic questions, please see https://shanghai.nyu.edu/advising/fall-2020. For non-academic questions pertinent to entering first-year students, please see https://shanghai.nyu.edu/classof2024FAQs.

If you are a sophomore, junior, or senior, you must complete the short survey at the following link by July 20, in order to confirm your interest in one of the Options above and to assist us in offering the courses all students need to continue to make progress towards their degrees in the fall: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSdKDHCHp733V2S02Z00e8XCzLI52QmtTLYkEJZQ2l24Szb2vw/viewform?usp=sf_link.

Thank you for your patience and flexibility as we navigate these unprecedented issues together.  Our university has forged a unique identity as a close-knit, cosmopolitan society of scholars. We have had to work together with creativity and resilience to adapt to a rapidly evolving environment that is far beyond our control. As this year unfolds, we have confidence in our collective ability to keep meeting new challenges, doing what is necessary to preserve the qualities that make NYU Shanghai special.

[*] As we have previously indicated, we will also be welcoming approximately 3000 other NYU undergraduate and graduate students who are currently in China to study with us on a temporary campus elsewhere in Shanghai. We will all be doing our best to ensure that these visitors enjoy a satisfying semester as members of the NYU Shanghai community without undermining the experience of those who are pursuing NYU Shanghai degrees.

[†] If you are currently outside China and were scheduled to study away at another NYU campus or site this semester, you should still be able to do so as long as you are lawfully able to live and study at that location without need for a student visa.

View result counter: 21
10 months 1 week ago
Fall Semester
To: NYU Shanghai Students
From:
  • Tong Shijun, Chancellor
  • Jeffrey S. Lehman, Vice Chancellor
  • Joanna Waley-Cohen, Provost
Relevance: Students & Parents

Dear NYU Shanghai Sophomores, Juniors, and Seniors:

We write now to share an update on how we are adapting to the continuously evolving global situation, and what it implies as you plan for the fall semester.

As you all know, the COVID-19 epidemic infection was fully controlled in Shanghai in March through strict testing, quarantine, and distancing rules, and it remained controlled. Accordingly, we were able to resume live classes on our campus at the end of April. Looking ahead to the fall semester, we expect that our residence halls and Academic Building will remain open, and that we will be in full operation under our “responsible reopening” protocols.

We naturally expect that all our Chinese students will be able to be back in the classroom in Shanghai this fall. When it comes to our international students who were planning to be back in Shanghai this fall, the need to cross borders makes matters somewhat more complex. We are currently concentrating our attention on three scenarios:

  1. The most likely scenario is that the current restrictions on travel to China will be lifted and our international students will be able to return to China in time to begin classes on September 14. We expect to know by July 15 whether this scenario has come to pass, and we will provide you definitive confirmation at that time.
  2. The second-most-likely scenario is that the travel restrictions will not be lifted in time for the first day of classes but will be lifted in time for our international students to return part way through the semester. In this situation our international students will begin the fall semester by taking NYU Shanghai classes remotely and will rejoin their classmates in Shanghai as soon as that becomes possible. The classes will combine asynchronous and synchronous instruction, and all students will receive academic support tailored to their personal circumstances.
  3. The least likely scenario is that the travel restrictions will not be lifted until the fall semester is over and our international students will be taking NYU Shanghai classes remotely throughout the fall and will return to Shanghai for the spring semester.

For our junior and seniors students who are eligible to Study Away during the coming semester according to our current academic policies, please note that the global pandemic situation means that study away opportunities will be modified.  You will learn more very soon from the Office of Global Programs.

Sophomore students who are not currently eligible for Study Away will receive an update setting forth your options after July 15th.

The situation for this fall is dramatically different for Chinese students who are not NYU Shanghai students but are, rather, enrolled as students at NYU New York or NYU Abu Dhabi. For them, the most likely scenario is that they will not be able to get back to their base campus this fall. To help them out, NYU Shanghai will be opening a “temporary academic building” nearby in Pudong where they will be able to take classes appropriate to their particular degree programs pursuant to a “Go Local” program. We will want to show a welcoming NYU Shanghai spirit to our new “visitors,” and we will do our best to help them feel at home.

We regret that the ongoing uncertainties are complicating the task of planning, even as the beginning of fall semester seems to be approaching rapidly. We are continuing to monitor developments on a daily basis.

If you are an international student and have changes to your passports and have not been in touch with the student mobility team, please contact shanghai.student-mobility@nyu.edu. If and when you have academic questions, please contact shanghai.advising@nyu.edu.

This past semester presented our university with difficult challenges, and we were able to meet them thanks to our shared commitment to being a close-knit, cosmopolitan scholarly community. We are confident that those same values will serve us well, whatever new challenges may await us this autumn.

View result counter: 22
12 months 4 days ago
End-of-Semester Update (Students)
To: NYU Shanghai Students
From:
  • Yu Lizhong, Chancellor
  • Jeffrey S. Lehman, Vice Chancellor
  • Joanna Waley-Cohen, Provost
Relevance: Students
Dear NYU Shanghai Students,
 
With the conclusion of spring classes, we would like to thank you for your perseverance throughout this difficult semester. Remote learning, mixed-mode classrooms, and new protocols for hygiene and distancing have presented challenges for students, faculty, and staff, and we admire the creativity and spirit with which our school has faced them. We are especially grateful for your repeated acts of generosity towards those who have been suffering the most, both within and beyond the NYU Shanghai community.
 
Next week will be a time for commencements, in every sense of the word. We will be holding the graduation ceremonies for our Class of 2020 using remote technology. We have much to celebrate, including notably the first graduates to have earned master’s degrees from NYU Shanghai. We invite you to join us for the undergraduate commencement ceremony on Friday, May 29th, at 20:20 (8:20 pm) Shanghai time, and the master's convocation ceremony on Sunday, May 31st, at 9:00 am Shanghai time. For undergraduates, the schedule of activities and live-stream will be hosted at https://commencement.shanghai.nyu.edu. Master's graduates will continue to receive updates from Dean Mao.
 
For those of you who are not graduating, our plans for next academic year are well under way. The leadership of New York University will be communicating with you separately about plans for NYU’s other degree-granting campuses and sites. Here is how things are looking right now for us on the Shanghai campus:
 
* Because of the delay in administering the gaokao examination this summer and the need to have our university follow a single academic calendar, all our classes and dorm move-ins will begin two weeks later than they have in the past; the first day of classes will be September 14, and the last day of fall final exams will be December 22. We expect the current restrictions on foreign citizens’ entry into China to have been lifted by mid-summer, but we expect the two-week quarantine requirement to remain in place.
 
* We will be teaching our classes in person. (We re-opened our campus to students and resumed classroom teaching three weeks ago.) We expect that the Chinese government will resume processing international student visa applications in June. If for any reason a student cannot enter China or complete the two-week quarantine in time to start classes, they will be able to participate in classes remotely until they arrive and complete the quarantine. 
 
* As for the details of daily life, we expect social distancing rules to continue in effect until COVID-19 therapeutic medicines or vaccines are approved. But it is entirely possible that the current rules may be modified, which would affect, for example, extracurricular activities. 
 
To be sure, our plans are all tentative. Our work as a university takes place within the context of public health. Our responsibilities to the larger society require us all to keep adapting to new information about the pandemic as it becomes known to us. And our commitments to excellence in education require us all to keep adapting to new information about the most effective ways to keep learning when more traditional approaches are no longer possible.
 
We will be keeping you posted on developments in all these areas as the summer unfolds. In the meantime, we wish you good luck as you wrap up any remaining classwork, and we wish you safe and satisfying summers.
 
We are Shanghai!
 
View result counter: 23
1 year 3 weeks ago
Hardship fund--May
To: NYU Shanghai Faculty and Staff
From:
  • Joanna Waley-Cohen, Provost
Relevance: Faculty & Staff
Dear Colleagues,
 
I am writing to invite final applications for relief of significant hardship, this time with regard to expenses relating to May.
 
As you know our campus is partially reopening on April 27th for graduating seniors who are in China, and if all goes well we expect to open for students from other classes who are in China in early May. We know that not all students and faculty currently in China will be returning--and those who are outside China will not yet be able to return--but we are (very) excited to welcome those who do. 
 
 As before, those facing serious financial hardship should submit, by May 1, applications for relief relating to the month of May. To request funds from this contingency fund, please submit a detailed explanation (e.g., amount requested, justification, etc) and relevant supporting documentation to  Casey Owens (casey.m.owens@nyu.edu) (for faculty) or Guo Wei (wg22@nyu.edu) (for staff). Requests will be carefully reviewed and considered in light of need, the amount requested, and the overall amount of funding still available for these purposes. 
 
 WIshing you all good health and good spirits,
 
 Joanna
View result counter: 24
1 year 3 weeks ago
Reopening Update
To: Members of the NYU Shanghai Community
From:
  • Yu Lizhong, Chancellor
  • Jeffrey S. Lehman, Vice Chancellor
  • Joanna Waley-Cohen, Provost
Relevance: All NYU Shanghai Students, Faculty, and Staff

This message extends and slightly modifies last week’s message concerning the gradual reopening of our campus facilities and the beginning of mixed-mode teaching for the rest of the semester. We are now able to make the following two announcements:

1. Graduating seniors and graduate students who are currently in China may return to campus on April 27.

2. If there are no unexpected developments during the next two weeks, other students who are currently in China may return to campus on May 4. [*]

Although we expect faculty members, teaching support personnel, and administrative staff who are currently in mainland China to be back on campus next week, returning to campus is purely elective for students. Teaching will be in mixed mode, so each student may decide whether they will join a class that is taking place in a classroom or whether they will continue participating remotely [+]. Moreover, the purpose of reopening will be to resume in-person academic activities; social and athletic activities will not be restarting, and examinations will continue to be delivered remotely.

Those of you who return to campus will see that it is very different from when you last saw it. Because the coronavirus is so dangerous, we will be following best practices for hygiene and distancing within a community that is cautiously and carefully reopening. When we enter the Academic Building or the residence halls, we must first show our green QR health codes and walk through a temperature scanner. We must wear face masks in public places and maintain physical distance from each other in elevators and classrooms. We make frequent use of the hand sanitizer, which is available in dispensers everywhere.

When we use our reopened cafeteria, we will have to sit one-person-per-table. The Academic Building will only be open to us from 7:30 am to 8:30 pm, Monday through Saturday (and during any classroom teaching ours that may fall outside that range), so that it can be properly sanitized and ventilated. Last but not least, students will be required to spend their time exclusively in the Academic Building and their residences; they may not visit Shanghai public spaces except as needed to move back and forth or as is necessary to accomplish essential tasks.

The point of all these changes is that NYU Shanghai is being challenged to serve as a model of responsible reopening. COVID-19 is highly contagious, it is dangerous, and as of yet there are no demonstrably safe and effective therapeutic medications. The incidence of the disease is low enough in Shanghai that we are able to reopen in this way, but it is essential that we do so in a manner that minimizes the risks to public health.

Of course, this is precisely the sort of challenge that our university was designed to meet. As individuals, and as a community, we gladly accept the responsibilities that go with being part of an innovative experiment that we hope will contribute to the betterment of our world. It is in that spirit that we will go forward and complete a semester unlike any other.

We are Shanghai!

[*] Please note that this is two days earlier than the date mentioned in our last message and reflects our university’s academic calendar for this semester. 

[+] The following information conveyed in last week’s message remains in effect:

  • These developments do not include students who are currently outside China (regardless of nationality). Nor do they affect the temporary ban on entry into the country by faculty members who are not Chinese citizens. Nor do they affect the mandatory 14-day quarantine requirement for Chinese faculty who return.
  • Classes where the professor and at least some students can be present in the Academic Building will shift to mixed-mode format. Our administrative support teams will work with the professor to enable the conduct of effective classes where some students are in the classroom with the professor and other students are participating remotely. Classes taught by professors who are not able to be present in the Academic Building will continue to be taught remotely as they have been throughout the semester.
  • We are not permitted to welcome visitors to the campus during this first period, and we will not be allowed to hold gatherings other than for the teaching of classes. 
 
经过学校研究,我们对上周通知的开学日期做了微调,现对学生返校和在本学期剩余时间开展混合式教学等工作做如下部署:
 
 

1. 4月27日开始,目前在中国大陆境内的毕业年级学生(含本科和研究生)可以返校。

2. 未来两周内如无特殊情况,5月4日开始,目前在中国大陆境内的其他年级学生可以返校。[*]

目前在中国大陆境内的教师和员工于4月27日陆续返岗。学生可自主决定是否返校。所有具备现场教学条件的课都采取线上和课堂相结合的混合式教学模式,学生可自由选择返校进行课堂学习或继续远程线上学习。[+] 开学仅限课堂教学的逐渐恢复,所有课外、社交、体育等活动仍然暂停,所有考试仍然采取远程在线的方式。

由于尚处于疫情防控期间,学校会在日常运维管理上实施一些特殊措施以保障大家的健康与安全,如所有返校人员均应遵守相应的卫生和社交距离等规范;进入教学楼或宿舍时要出示个人绿色安全码,且经测量体温无发热后方可进入;在教学楼和宿舍的公共区域必须佩戴口罩;在教室和电梯内必须保持适当的距离。学校还在校园各处放置无水洗手液,方便大家随时洗手。

食堂用餐时一人一桌。教学楼开放时间为周一至周六上午7:30到晚上8:30(或当天最后一节课下课)。每天闭楼之后进行全楼深度消毒和通风。特别提请各位同学注意,学生返校之后活动范围仅限教学楼和宿舍,以及生活必须活动,除此以外不得外出或出入其他公共场所。

所有这些措施都是为了在开学期间对每一位师生员工的健康负责。上海目前疫情防控形势良好,开学的进展来之不易,毕竟新冠肺炎易传染、危害大,且尚无特效药物,所以大家一定要严格遵守校内的防控规范,切不可掉以轻心。

上海纽约大学为探索而生,这个集体和其中的每一个人都始终乐观面对眼前的困难与挑战。在经历了这样一个崎岖坎坷的学期之后,让我们为它画上一个漂亮的休止符。

[*] 返校日期的提前是根据学校校历的授课日程安排而定。

[+] 上周发布的通知中的以下信息仍然有效:

  • 当前的安排不适用于目前身处中国大陆境外的学生,无论其国籍。也不能影响中国大陆目前禁止外籍人士入境,或对中国籍人士入境后强制健康观察14天的规定。
  • 如教师和(部分)学生具备返校条件,则该门课将转为线上和课堂相结合的混合式教学模式。学校相关的技术团队将和教师一起保证在场和在线上的学生都能顺利完成课业。教师无法完成课堂教学的课程仍维持纯线上教学。
  • 在此期间,学校不得接待访客,也不得举办除课堂教学以外的任何聚集性活动。
View result counter: 25
1 year 3 weeks ago
Return to on-campus teaching
To: All Faculty
From:
  • Joanna Waley-Cohen, Provost
Relevance: All faculty

Dear Colleagues

This message applies only to those who are CURRENTLY IN CHINA. 

 Please note the following wIth regard to reopening the campus and resuming on-site teaching in mixed mode, starting April 27:

If you haven't already done so, please immediately complete and return RITS' survey so that we can make classroom assignments. Here is the link to the survey:  https://forms.gle/ny7ZZAMae6gyyLas8

Please find out from the students in each of your classes how many plan to return to take classes in person in the Academic Building, and let Winnie know accordingly.  

 For those teaching synchronously but not at the originally assigned class time, please work with the Registrar's office on both class time and locations.  We encourage you to stay in the original time and location in Albert as the default. 

 Final exams will be held online unless all students in the class are back to AB. 

If you do not plan to teach in the Academic Building please get in touch with your Dean. 

Time is short so please take action as soon as possible!

Finally, please be aware that SMEC requires that faculty and students wear masks and maintain distancing in class. 

Thank you all. 

Joanna

View result counter: 26
1 year 1 month ago
4.6.20 faculty meeting
To: NYU Shanghai Faculty
From:
  • Joanna Waley-Cohen, Provost
Relevance: All Faculty

Dear Colleagues

I hope this finds you safe and well. 

Below is a summary of the points covered by Jeff and myself at last week's faculty meeting. Some of it has been superseded by more recent developments as set out in the update message you will have received from us this morning.

Joanna

 Shanghai current status

--Life in Shanghai is getting back to a level of normality--with masks. Border closing is a temporary policy that China wants to lift as soon as things come back under control overseas. The prospects in Europe and the US are improving but it is unlikely borders will reopen to foreigners before late April/early May at the earliest, which with 2 weeks of quarantine makes it unlikely faculty overseas will be able to get back onto campus before the end of the semester. Not impossible, but very unlikely.

 Reopening

--Please see our most recent message for updates on reopening.

 We will reopen if we can, to show our support of government efforts to manage the relaunch of society as quickly as possible. Many of our students and faculty are in Shanghai, so it would be odd to decline to reopen.  Faculty and staff (but not students) can re-enter the academic building now, with protocols. Faculty in China should come back if they can, but we understand there will be a lot of complications to be considered for individuals.

 --About the applicability of policy announcements we receive from NYU Provost Katy Fleming:

Matters that go to the Board of Trustees (like tenure clock extensions) apply to us automatically. They are uniform across the university.

Most other matters do not apply to us automatically. They are aimed at the New York campus, which is different from the Shanghai campus in many ways. The disease epidemiology is different. And the New York campus is not growing, but we still are.

Nevertheless, we consult with NY all the time and for the most part we try to harmonize whenever it makes sense to do so. We try not to be different unless there is a reason to be different.

 --About pass-fail, including for capstones:

It is up to the students, not the faculty, to make the choice to take the capstone, or any other course, pass/fail. What’s more the faculty won’t know if a student is taking a class pass/fail so they must submit letter grades. For that reason, to maintain integrity it’s important not to make any kind of grade deals with your student.

 --Faculty Recruitment this year

10 new tenured and tenure-track faculty with 2 (now 3) offers outstanding, as follows: 4 in Business; 2 in Sociology; 2 in Math; 1 in Global China Studies; 1 in Art History; outstanding offers in Global Public Health, Computer Science, and IMB.

We unfortunately had to halt searches in Philosophy, Environmental Studies, and for a Director of Chinese Language. The Data Science search was not successful.

Other new faculty include:

1 in Social Science, 4 in Writing; 2 in EAP; 4 Math Visitors; 3 Humanities Visitors; 5 new GPS Teaching Fellows; 1 Math Teaching Fellow

As for next year’s faculty recruitment, it’s too soon to say whether or what hiring we’ll be able to do. We have frozen new hires until things become clearer because our top priority is to keep our existing faculty employed.

 --Faculty discretionary funds

Our approach is different from New York's.  This year’s unused annual discretionary funds cannot be rolled over. We don’t yet know about next year—too much is in flux right now. As for startup funds or other funds for specific research projects, usually provided for a multi-year period with automatic roll-over: if you currently have access to this kind of time-sensitive startup or grant funding and it’s about to reach the end of its automatic rollover period, please get in touch with me (Joanna).

A question subsequently came up about rolling over unused home leave. Home leave is annual and isn’t bankable. It regenerates in September. You may be able to use unused home leave to defray the cost of return to Shanghai.

 --Fall Semester plans

As of now we expect to be teaching face to face in fall semester.

Likely to have at least a full crop of new students, Chinese and international, in part for visa reasons.

Gaokao one-month delay makes things tight for our Chinese students. A task force is working to adjust the fall academic calendar, considering e.g. a shorter orientation and later exams. More soon on this.

Of course, we have to consider how we would teach our fall classes if we have to do them remotely. 

In general, we know that we all need to plan; that we all need to make contingency plans, and that any time you start to make contingency plans for X somebody is going to announce that you are planning to do X. Contingency plans by definition are contingency plans, not actual plans. 

 --Contract faculty re-appointments

The reviews that were conducted this semester are almost complete.

For those who are up for review in the fall, as of now we expect those to proceed as usual. If you are due to be reviewed in the fall and have a concern about the timing you should speak with your Dean.

View result counter: 27
1 year 1 month ago
Update Message
To: NYU Shanghai Community
From:
  • Yu Lizhong, Chancellor
  • Jeffrey S. Lehman, Vice Chancellor
  • Joanna Waley-Cohen, Provost
Relevance: All NYU Shanghai Students, Faculty, and Staff
Dear Members of the NYU Shanghai Community,
 
This weekend, the novel coronavirus has caused devastating harm to the people of New York City. The NYU family has been working together to direct resources to where they are most needed, and we are proud that NYU Shanghai has been playing a role in that effort. https://shanghai.nyu.edu/news/nyus-shanghai-community-sends-supplies-help-nycs-fight-against-covid-19. We continue to hope and pray for the well-being of all in our own community and beyond.
 
We write now to advise you of new developments concerning the gradual reopening of our campus facilities. The Shanghai government has announced that it might soon begin to allow university campuses to reopen, but in stages. Graduating seniors and graduate students who are currently in China might be permitted to return to campus on April 27 (at the earliest). Other students who are currently in China might be permitted to return to campus on May 6 (at the earliest).
 
This early stage will not include students who are currently outside China (regardless of nationality). Nor will it affect the temporary ban on entry into the country by faculty members who are not Chinese citizens. Nor will it affect the mandatory 14-day quarantine requirement for Chinese faculty who return.
 
As we have indicated throughout the semester, we are committed to reopening our campus as soon as we are authorized to do so. We will submit proposals that we be allowed to commence mixed-mode teaching on the dates indicated, and we hope that these early stages of reopening will demonstrate our readiness for a more complete reopening for Summer Term classes. 
 
If our proposals are accepted, teaching will unfold as follows. Classes where the professor and at least some students can be present in the Academic Building will shift to mixed-mode format. Our administrative support teams will work with the professor to enable the conduct of effective classes where some students are in the classroom with the professor and other students are participating remotely. Classes taught by professors who are not able to be present in the Academic Building will continue to be taught remotely as they have been throughout the semester.
 
Finally, we have been advised that we will not be permitted to welcome visitors to the campus during this first period, and we will not be allowed to hold gatherings other than for the teaching of classes. Accordingly, it will not be possible for us to hold our traditional commencement celebration at the Oriental Arts Center this spring. In the coming weeks we will be writing separately about plans for a substitute celebration on May 29. Graduate students graduating this semester will also hear from us separately about their celebration.
 
The spring 2020 semester has been terribly stressful, and we wish that we could all have concluded it together on Century Avenue. We are proud of how our united community has faced each new challenge with strength and understanding. We are grateful for how our faculty, students, and staff have continuously developed creative responses that enable us to keep teaching, learning, engaging with each other, and engaging with those around us in ways that exemplify the values we cherish.
 
We are Shanghai!
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1 year 1 month ago
NYU Shanghai commencement
To: NYU Shanghai Students
From:
  • Yu Lizhong, Chancellor
  • Jeffrey S. Lehman, Vice-Chancellor
  • Joanna Waley-Cohen, Provost
Relevance: All students
Dear Class of 2020,
 
NYU has now determined that it must postpone both this spring’s university-wide Yankee Stadium commencement ceremony and also the ceremonies at New York schools and colleges. 
 
Our NYU Shanghai ceremony remains scheduled for May 29; we do not yet know whether it will happen as planned. Public health authorities must make a series of difficult judgments during the next month. We will in all events make a final decision about our commencement by May 1, so that any students who wish to attend will be able to fulfill any remaining applicable quarantine requirements.
 
What if we cannot have a live ceremony? And if we have a live ceremony, what about students who cannot be there? 
 
Any member of the Class of 2020 who cannot walk across the stage and shake our hands on May 29 will be allowed to:
 
a) participate virtually through a livestreamed event on that day,
 
b) attend the rescheduled university-wide ceremony in New York, and 
 
c) attend the commencement exercises in Shanghai next spring, in May 2021.
 
Although those forms of participation are not ideal, they would all celebrate and affirm your remarkable achievement. The Class of 2020 is surmounting a previously unimaginable challenge. In the history of NYU Shanghai, your class will be legendary.
 
We know you may have questions, and we ask that you send any questions to Dean Pe (davidpe@nyu.edu). He is working closely with your class’s commencement committee and will be following up with you all. 
 
Last but not least, your committee has put together a fantastic virtual countdown event this coming Saturday, March 28. We look forward to seeing you there.
 
We Are Shanghai!
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1 year 1 month ago
A Message about NYU's 2020 Commencement
To: NYU Community
From:
  • Andy Hamilton, President of NYU
Relevance: NYU Global Community

Members of the NYU Community,

There are few academic rituals more meaningful and enduring than Commencements. On these special occasions, we come together as a community to mark the achievements of our talented graduates in the presence of families and friends, faculty and alumni; to proclaim the power of learning and scholarship; to pass the torch of knowledge from one generation to another.

It is with deepest regret, therefore, that I write to let you know that NYU’s 188th All-University Commencement Exercises, due to take place in Yankee Stadium on Wednesday, May 20, 2020, must be postponed to a date still to be decided. Likewise, the individual school graduation ceremonies cannot go forward as planned. Given the advice of public health officials, as well as the restrictions put in place by city and state authorities, and out of our own sense of obligation to safeguard the safety of our community, it is impossible to imagine we could or should hold such large assemblies this spring.

Be assured, however, that once we are on the other side of this difficult and extraordinary time, we will find a way to hold an in-person graduation exercise and properly recognize the Class of 2020 with all the pomp and circumstance you deserve and that NYU knows how to muster.

In making this decision, we have consulted with student leaders as well as the deans of our schools, and we are grateful for their guidance. In short order, the deans will also be in touch with their graduates about the plans for the school graduation ceremonies or celebrations, whether virtual this spring and/or future in-person events at a later date. And while we cannot go forward with our physical gathering in Yankee Stadium, I want you all to mark the date May 20, 2020 on your calendars, for we will be looking for special ways to make sure we stay connected and celebrate the Class of 2020 on that day and in the weeks leading up to it--and to assure you that, yes, for all eligible graduates, degrees will be conferred!

To the Class of 2020: I feel keenly the disappointment you must be experiencing and I would remind you of the special bond I feel for your class. We “entered” NYU in the same year and I so looked forward to marking our four years together as you progressed from freshman to senior year. And I recognize that this news follows a string of developments and announcements, each one more unnerving than the last. Many of you and your families may have already put plans in motion to be on campus in May. I also realize that you understandably have a multitude of questions for which we do not yet have answers as we all navigate these turbulent times. But we pledge to keep you informed over these coming weeks and months as our plans evolve and we get a better sense of our options.

In an academic career spanning four decades at five universities, the highlight for me of each of those 40 years -- without a doubt – has been Commencement. While we will have to delay this year’s celebration, what does not have to be postponed is our expression of pride in what you have accomplished. And when we do convene to celebrate the Class of 2020 it will come with an added dose of praise and congratulations for the tremendous resiliency you have shown in the face of great adversity.

Please take care of yourselves and each other.

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