Fall 2018 English for Academic Purposes Topics

ENGL-SHU 100A EAP: Science in the Public Sphere (4 Credits)

The freshman English for Academic Purposes (EAP) course is designed to help you develop the high-level language, communication, and critical thinking skills you need to be successful in an English-speaking university. While the primary emphasis is on speaking and listening, you will also practice reading and writing. You will engage with content individually and in groups. During the semester, you will complete a variety of communicative tasks, reflective writing assignments and an experiential learning project outside the walls of the university. The course is designed to help you acquire skills that also can be transferred to your future professional and personal lives. The thematic, content-based EAP seminar also aims to help you cultivate an interest in issues that cross disciplines, an important part of a well-rounded, liberal arts education. These course outcomes will be met through engagement with authentic readings and videos on the ways in which the public engages with science and the role of scientists in society. You can expect to enhance your understanding and appreciation of the ways in which the public receives and influences scientific research and discovery.

 

ENGL-SHU 100F EAP: Business in the 21st Century (4 Credits)

The freshman English for Academic Purposes (EAP) course is designed to help you develop the high-level language, communication, and critical thinking skills you need to be successful in an English-speaking university. While the primary emphasis is on speaking and listening, you will also practice reading and writing. You will engage with content individually and in groups, complete a variety of communicative tasks, reflective writing assignments and an experiential learning project outside the walls of the university. The courses are designed to help you acquire skills that can be also be transferred to your future professional and personal lives, and to help you cultivate an interest in issues that cross disciplines, an important part of a well-rounded, liberal arts education. Specifically, this course will investigate the role of business organizations in what some call the “post-modern period,” or the 21st century. As technology develops and both social and environmental needs evolve, what role does business play in society? What role should it play? What are current business trends in the west? In China? What are current narratives (cultural, historical, personal) about business and how do such narratives shape business practices themselves? In this course, there will be an emphasis on both creative and critical thinking as we ask questions, analyze problems and come up with our own solutions.

ENGL-SHU 100G EAP: Negotiating Self and Other (4 Credits)

The freshman English for Academic Purposes (EAP) course is designed to help you develop the high-level language, communication, and critical thinking skills you need to be successful in an English-speaking university. While the primary emphasis is on speaking and listening, you will also practice reading and writing. You will engage with content individually and in groups, complete a variety of communicative tasks, reflective writing assignments and an experimental learning project outside the walls of the university. The courses are designed to help you acquire skills that can be also be transferred to your future professional and personal lives. The thematic, content-based EAP seminar, also aims to help you cultivate an interest in issues that cross disciplines, an important part of a well-rounded, liberal arts education. The “self” is a natural place to begin. The problem is that this is all-too-often simply taken for granted. What are selves? Are we what we say we are? But what about the way we appear to others? An important constraint on what we may become is our membership in various communities. Students will be presented with a variety of texts (written and visual, including video, audio clips, and print advertising) in order to assist them in forming their opinions about the process of negotiation between self and other in society. Moreover, the concept of ‘negotiation’ itself will be highlighted and explored in this context. Some of the subthemes that will be discussed will be self-concept and identity construction, culture and sub-culture, treatment of minority groups, gender identity, and material and consumer identities.

ENGL-SHU 100Q EAP: Digital Identities in Modern Public Spheres (4 Credits)

The freshman English for Academic Purposes (EAP) course is designed to help you develop the high-level language, communication, and critical thinking skills you need to be successful in an English-speaking university. While the primary emphasis is on speaking and listening, you will also practice reading and writing. You will engage with content individually and in groups, complete a variety of communicative tasks, reflective writing assignments and an experiential learning project outside the walls of the university. The courses are designed to help you acquire skills that can be also be transferred to your future professional and personal lives, and to help you cultivate an interest in issues that cross disciplines, an important part of a well-rounded, liberal arts education. The pervasiveness of our ever-changing media and communication landscapes offer both innovation and complication for the content and interpretation of our messages. Using the framework of the “public sphere”, virtual realms of social life where society’s problems are open for discussion, we will consider how various digital platforms (news feeds, blogs, chat groups, social media platforms, etc.) control our worldview and influence our evolving selves. Additionally, we will examine how distinctive identities (gender, social class, race, nationality, sexuality) are formed, developed, and expressed via networks (online and in person). Across the semester, you will conduct an investigation of how the concepts of identity (personal) and community (collective) are integrated into the digitally mediated culture. After being introduced to rhetorical theories and concepts, you will be asked to apply them to the analysis and exploration of a variety of online platforms, technologies, and communities. Overall, through this course, learners will gain a better understanding of the power of mass digital communication and how to use it while navigating through various networks.

ENGL-SHU 100R EAP: (Un)Sustainability (4 Credits)

The freshman English for Academic Purposes (EAP) course is designed to help you develop the high-level language, communication, and critical thinking skills you need to be successful in an English-speaking university. While the primary emphasis is on speaking and listening, you will also practice reading and writing. You will engage with content individually and in groups, complete a variety of communicative tasks, reflective writing assignments and an experiential learning project outside the walls of the university. The courses are designed to help you acquire skills that can be also be transferred to your future professional and personal lives, and to help you cultivate an interest in issues that cross disciplines, an important part of a well-rounded, liberal arts education. We will inquire into the multidimensional aspects of sustainable development, focusing on the tools, metrics and practical pathways the world is currently exploring. In addition, we will investigate various success indicators for sustainable development. (Un)Sustainability views sustainable development solutions in the context of a range of subfields in addition to sustainability itself, including climate change and political action, and will afford learners the opportunity to carry out a team-based project in relation to the issues posed by this rich interdisciplinary terrain. This course encourages you to consider your role as a responsible 21st century global citizen and promotes analytical and reflective thinking on this role as it relates to global sustainability, including the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) set in 2015. The SDG’s are a collection of 17 global goals covering social and economic development issues including poverty, hunger, health, education, climate change, gender, equality, water, sanitation, energy, urbanization, environment and social justice.

ENGL-SHU 100T EAP: The Greater Good (4 Credits)

The freshman English for Academic Purposes (EAP) course is designed to help you develop the high-level language, communication, and critical thinking skills you need to be successful in an English-speaking university. While the primary emphasis is on speaking and listening, you will also practice reading and writing. You will engage with content individually and in groups, complete a variety of communicative tasks, reflective writing assignments and an experiential learning project outside the walls of the university. The courses are designed to help you acquire skills that can also be transferred to your future professional and personal lives, and to help you cultivate an interest in issues that cross disciplines, an important part of a well-rounded, liberal arts education. Specifically, this course will explore contemporary issues in global public health through a central theme of ‘the greater good’, a concern for the collective, in issues such as climate change, food security, and population control. It is easy for such challenges to remain abstract, and to imagine teams of experts in far-away places working to address them, and this distance tends to blur the role of the individual. We will examine the tension between individual choice and collective good, between local action and global impact, which runs through a number of global public health topics and manifests across the world in different ways. Additionally, the course will ask you to view these topics with a critical eye through an interdisciplinary lens, applying insights from environmental science, public policy, business, and health. Overall, learners will consider questions such as who stands to benefit from global health policies and initiatives, what is at stake in specific global health issues, and how such issues are being explored globally and locally, just beyond the walls of the classroom in Shanghai.

ENGL-SHU 100U EAP: Money Stuff (4 Credits)

The freshman English for Academic Purposes (EAP) course is designed to help you develop the high-level language, communication, and critical thinking skills you need to be successful in an English-speaking university. While the primary emphasis is on speaking and listening, you will also practice reading and writing. You will engage with content individually and in groups, complete a variety of communicative tasks, reflective writing assignments and an experiential learning project outside the walls of the university. The courses are designed to help you acquire skills that can be also be transferred to your future professional and personal lives, and to help you cultivate an interest in issues that cross disciplines, an important part of a well-rounded, liberal arts education. Specifically, this course will investigate the world of money and the ideas and practices of the global financial system. Using a daily financial column, as well as other videos, talks, lectures, podcasts, and readings, we will examine what money is and explore current issues in the financial world. Specifically, this course will investigate the historical uses and roles of money in a macro sense; the roles technology has played and will play in the financial world; and what the roles and purposes of the financial sector are, and how we evaluate and regulate what it does and how it affects our world. Concurrent with our study of the hows and whys of finance, we will also critically address moral and ethical issues around global finance, and how it affects the people and societies of the world. Overall, through this course, learners will broaden their understanding of finance and develop the tools and skills to critically think about and evaluate money stuff in the world.

ENGL-SHU 100S1 EAP: Science in the Public Sphere (2 Credits, only available to students who will take 8-credit FOS courses)

Part I of two sections: The freshman English for Academic Purposes (EAP) course is designed to help you develop the high-level language, communication, and critical thinking skills you need to be successful in an English-speaking university. While the primary emphasis is on speaking and listening, you will also practice reading and writing. You will engage with content individually and in groups. In the fall semester, you will complete a variety of communicative tasks, reflective writing assignments and the planning and preparation for an experiential learning project that will be carried out in the spring semester. The course is designed to help you acquire skills that also can be transferred to your future professional and personal lives. The thematic, content-based EAP seminar also aims to help you cultivate an interest in issues that cross disciplines, an important part of a well-rounded, liberal arts education. These course outcomes will be met through engagement with authentic readings and videos on the ways in which the public engages with science and the role of scientists in society. You can expect to enhance your understanding and appreciation of the ways in which the public receives and influences scientific research and discovery. The spring semester will be a continuation of this theme and with further development of language, communication, and critical thinking goals.