Recommended Courses for Prehealth Students

Medical schools in the United States do not require that you major in a science to be admitted. They usually require students to complete a portfolio of required course work during their undergraduate career in preparation for the Medical College Admission Test (MCAT). These courses often include, but are not limited to, physics, biology, chemistry, mathematics, English writing, and social and behavioral sciences. The requirements for four-year doctoral programs in many healthcare professions, including medicine and dentistry, are similar, and are standardized across most professional schools.

However, some health professions may have variable requirements (e.g., some programs do not require organic chemistry; some require multiple psychology or statistics courses) and the requirements are subject to change. Thus, students are encouraged to research individual program's admission requirements.

While the prerequisites below dictate the order courses should be taken, the exact timing will vary from student to student based on academic background, selected major, and participation in various programs at the university.

Recommended Courses for Application to Medical Schools

Course Number

Course Title

Pre-requisites or Co-requisites

MATH-SHU 131 Calculus Pre-req: Placement or MATH-SHU 9 Precalculus

PHYS-SHU 91/

PHYS-SHU 11

Foundations of Physics I Honors/

General Physics I

Pre-req or Co-req: MATH-SHU 201 Honors Calculus/MATH-SHU 131 Calculus

CHEM-SHU 125

Foundations of Chemistry I

Pre-req or Co-req: MATH-SHU 131 Calculus/MATH-SHU 201 Honors Calculus

PHYS-SHU 71

FoS Physics Laboratory

Pre-req or Co-req: PHYS-SHU 91 Foundations of Physics I Honors/PHYS-SHU 11 General Physics I

PHYS-SHU 93/

PHYS-SHU 12

Foundations of Physics II Honors/

General Physics II

Pre-req: PHYS-SHU 91 Foundations of Physics I Honors/PHYS-SHU 11 General Physics I

PHYS-SHU 94 Physics II Lab Pre-req: PHYS-SHU 71 FoS Physics Laboratory

CHEM-SHU 126

Foundations of Chemistry II

Pre-req: CHEM-SHU 125 Foundations of Chemistry I

CHEM-SHU 127  

FoS Chemistry Laboratory

Pre-req or Co-req: CHEM-SHU 125 Foundations of Chemistry I

CHEM-SHU 128 Chemistry II Lab Pre-req or Co-req: CHEM-SHU 125 Foundations of Chemistry II

BIOL-SHU 21

Foundations of Biology I

Pre-req or Co-req: MATH-SHU 131 Calculus or MATH-SHU 201 Honors Calculus

BIOL-SHU 22

Foundations of Biology II

Pre-req: BIOL-SHU 21 Foundations of Biology I

BIOL-SHU 123

FoS Biology Laboratory

Pre-req: BIOL-SHU 21 Foundations of Biology I

/

One Statistics Course (e.g., Probability and Statistics, Biostatistics)

 

CHEM-SHU 225

Organic Chemistry I

Pre-req: CHEM-SHU 126 Foundations of Chemistry II

CHEM-SHU 226

Organic Chemistry II

Pre-req: CHEM-SHU 225 Organic Chemistry I

CHEM-SHU 881

Biochemistry I

Pre-req: CHEM-SHU 226 Organic Chemistry II

/

Two Writing Courses

Combination of one or two Humanities or Global China Studies courses focused on writing

PSYC-SHU 101

Introduction to Psychology

/

/

Introductory Sociology Course (e.g., Introduction to Sociology, Sociology of Medicine, Health & Society in a Global Context)

/

 

Courses Offered at Study Away Sites:

 

Course Number at NYUSH

 

Course Title

Course Offerings at Study Away Sites

MATH-SHU 235

Probability and Statistics

NYU Abu Dhabi:

Probability and Statistics - MATH-UH 2011Q - 4 points

CHEM-SHU 225

Organic Chemistry I

NYU Abu Dhabi:

Organic Chemistry 1 - CHEM-UH 2010 - 4 points

NYU New York:
Organic Chemistry I - CHEM-UA 225 - 5 points (Lecture, Lab, & Recitation)

NYU London:
Organic Chemistry I - CHEM-UA 9225 - 5 points (Lecture, Lab, & Recitation)

CHEM-SHU 226

Organic Chemistry II

 

 

 

 

 

NYU Abu Dhabi:

Organic Chemistry 2 - CHEM-UH 3010 - 4 points

NYU New York:

Organic Chemistry II - CHEM-UA 226 - 5 points (Lecture, Lab, & Recitation)

NYU London:

Organic Chemistry II - CHEM-UA 9226 - 5 points (Lecture, Laboratory, & Recitation)

NYU Sydney:

Organic Chemistry II - CHEM-UA 9226 - 5 points (Lecture, Laboratory, & Recitation)

NYU Tel Aviv:

Organic Chemistry II - CHEM-UA 9226 - 5 points (Lecture, Laboratory, & Recitation)

CHEM-SHU 881

Biochemistry I

NYU Abu Dhabi:

Biochemistry: Macromolecular Structure and Function - CHEM-UH 3020 - 4 points

NYU New York:

Biochemistry I - CHEM-UA 881 - 4 points (Lecture & Recitation)

N/A

Two Writing Courses

NYU London:

Gothic Literature - ENGL-UA 9056 - 4 points

Modern Drama and Performance in London (Lecture & Theatre Visits) - DRLIT-UA 9133 or ENGL-UA 9133 - 4 points

Writing London - ENGL-UA 9182 - 4 points

The English Novel in the Nineteenth Century - ENGL-UA 9530 - 4 points

Major British Writers - ENGL-UA 9060 - 4 points

Postcolonial Indian Literature - ENGL-UA 9975 - 4 points

NYU Sydney:

World Literature in English II: Australia and New Zealand - ENGL-UA 9164 - 4 points

Readings in Contemporary Literary Theory: Eco-Criticism - ENVST-UA 9510 or ENGL-UA 9735 - 4 points

/

Introductory Psychology

NYU Abu Dhabi:

Introduction to Psychology - PSYCH-UH 1001 - 4 points

NYU London:

Introduction to Psychology - PSYCH-UA 9001 - 4 points

NYU Sydney:

Introduction to Psychology - PSYCH-UA 9001 - 4 points

NYU New York:

Introduction to Psychology - PSYCH-UA 1 - 4 points

/

Introductory Sociology

NYU New York:

Introduction to Sociology - SOC-UA 1 - 4 points

Notes

  • The above are the basic set requirements most medical schools in the United States have; however, admissions requirements vary from school to school. Specific medical schools may have additional requirements or modifications to those listed here.
  • Students can use literature and writing courses at NYU Shanghai to fulfill the writing course requirements. The writing courses can't be creative writing, but need to focus on writing or interpreting advanced texts. Students can also take writing courses at NYU’s global academic centers. To avoid confusion from the medical school admissions committee, it is best that you take writing courses offered by the English departments (with "ENGL" in their course numbers).
  • The Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) states that: “In general, most medical schools will expect applicants to have taken the Medical College Admission Test® (MCAT®), and to have completed the following types of courses: one year of biology, one year of physics, one year of English, and two years of chemistry (through organic chemistry),” it is common that medical schools will include biochemistry, calculus, psychology, and sociology as their required or recommended courses. The best source for this information for MD programs is the Medical Schools Admissions Requirements (MSAR) site.
  • Many students take the MCAT in their junior year. Students who intend to matriculate into a medical school directly following their undergraduate graduation should plan to take the MCAT the winter or spring term preceding a summer application.
  • Prior to their junior year, students are recommended to gain some practical experience by volunteering in a clinical setting and to demonstrate a commitment to service and humanistic endeavors. Building a portfolio of relevant experiences can be essential to students’ medical school applications.
  • Students who plan to take the MCAT as part of their preparation to apply to medical schools are advised to plan to take at least two courses in behavioral/ social sciences, since a broad range of social science topics are tested on that exam. We strongly recommend Introduction to Psychology (PSYC-SHU 101/PSYCH-UA 1) as an individual-level social science course, and recommend that students choose a second course focused on population-level topics. Appropriate courses include Introduction to Sociology (SOC-UA 1), Sociology of Medicine (SOC-UA 414), and Health & Society in a Global Context (UGPH-GU 10) offered in New York. In addition to coursework, students may use the AAMC's MCAT preparation resources as well as free resources like Khan Academy's MCAT tools and the MedEd Portal, to study social science topics for the MCAT.
  • Financial assistance for medical schools can be very limited and even more difficult for non-US citizens or permanent resident students. More info can be found here.

 

Helpful Websites

 

Reference